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Rhubarb Chutney

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

All I want to do is get my garden growing!  It’s all I have on my mind, these days.  Do I have all my seeds? Where are the shipments? Did I remember to buy non-GMO seeds? When can I get farmer Bud to till up the garden? Why am I so late, in thinking about all of these?  Potato SEEDS???? ugh!:(

 Yesterday, I was wandering around the yard, watching the clover grow and contemplating the future of my back yard. When I happened upon my wonderful rhubarb plant.

rhubarbplant

How lovely you are little, big plant!  I didn’t think of you and yet here you are. What a blessing:)

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A good friend, a couple years ago, gave me a bit of hers. Now I have, this honkin’ mass of beautiful rhubarb.  Each stalk is at less, an inch in thickness and two feet long.  I pulled out the biggest and longest stalk and then took a bite off the end!  WoooDoggy was it tart!  I felt like a kid all over.

Growing up in Michigan, My mother always had a plant or two her garden or along a fence line. My sister’s and I would each get a cup of white sugar and a short rhubarb stalk and go to town on it.  Dipping the stack in the sugar and then gnawing on the sweet fibers to mix the two flavors.  Yummy!

A few days ago my daughter had a birthday. She loves rhubarb. So, I thought for her big Birthday Bash, I would make something with Rhubarb!  I came across multiple recipes and with a little experimenting, I made this for Hanna!

Happy Birthday HANNA!

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Rhubarb Chutney

rhub chut

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Rhubarb Chutney

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
4 tablespoons Honey
1/4 cup water
1 pound rhubarb stalks, sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

Directions:
Heat oil in a medium saute pan. Add the shallots, allspice, salt and pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until just softened. Add the ginger and cook 1 minute more.  Add the rhubarb, honey and water to the pan. Cook until the rhubarb is just tender — you don’t want it to fall apart.  Remove fruit heat and stir in red wine vinegar.

Serve atop chicken, pork or salmon, alongside bread or biscuits or paired with sharp white cheddar, Manchego or blue cheese.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

God has blessed us this week. I pray he will bless you with grace.

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12 NIV

PS I’m not a great blogger, but I do love passing on this love of all things delicious!  If my grammar, spelling and punctuation is not correct please forgive me. I pray you can see pass that and see you heart.

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Old Fashion Bread Pudding with a Honey Vanilla Sauce

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

The Lord came down tonight and took my soul back to heaven, when I bit into this bread pudding.  haha!  Holy Moly, what a great recipe. Tonight is my husband’s birthday. He does not like any hype to this event.  I ask him every year what he would like to do for his big day.  And every year, for 28 years, I hear the same thing.  ” A roast dinner at home with the kids”. Done!  But this year, I just had to change it up a bit. We will finish off our dinners with a amazing bread pudding for dessert.   A special thanks to a friend of ours, Bev Haun. She FaceBook’d me this recipe.  It’s a Redneck Recipe! I’ve never considered myself a redneck, but a hilljack, that I might be:)  So this HillJack, she done, changed up the rec’pe just a tater and it, is, scrumptious!  I would invite ole’ Bev and her husband over, but they live way, down in Cincinnati.:)  i’ll eat extra for you.. Hugs!   So Happy Birthday Petie!

breadpudding

HillJack Bread Pudding with a Honey Vanilla Sauce

INGREDIENTS

  • • 4 cups (8 slices) cubed white bread• 1/2 cup raisins

    • 2 cups milk

    • 1/4 cup butter

    • 1/3 cup Hive & Honey BEEpothecary Honey

    • 2 eggs, slightly beaten

    • 1 tablespoon vanilla

    • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

    Sauce Ingredients:

    • 1/2 cup butter

    • 1/4 cup honey

    • 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar

    • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

    • 1 tablespoon vanilla

    Directions for Pudding:

    Heat oven to 350°F. Combine bread and raisins in large bowl. Combine milk and 1/4 cup butter in 1-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat until butter is melted (4 to 7 minutes). Pour milk mixture over bread; let stand 10 minutes.

    Stir in all remaining pudding ingredients. Pour into greased 1 1/2-quart casserole. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until set in center.

    Directions for Sauce:

    Combine all sauce ingredients except vanilla in 1-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until mixture thickens and comes to a full boil (5 to 8 minutes). Stir in vanilla.

    To serve, spoon warm pudding into individual dessert dishes; serve with sauce. Store refrigerated -Fashioned Bread Pudding with Vanilla Sauce

    Happy Eating !

Romans 5:2-5 Through him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God. More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.

Honey Zucchini Butter Bread

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

This spring, here in Ohio, the weather was wet and cold for at less 5 weeks. Our bees had a rough start. We had to feed them a high protein sugar water.  When it rains, bees don’t leave the hive.  In addition to that, the flowers from plants and trees emerged later then in previous springs. When the flowers did emerge, they came all at once. We were not given a long continuous nectar and pollen season. So our bees, were not able to produce a large production of honey for a  early summer extraction.  We have had to wait and care for our bees with a gentle hand this summer.  Good news though, we are looking forward to extracting honey in the next few days.  Crossing our fingers and hoping for a large production.

With the wet long spring,  my garden could not be tilled by Budd the old farmer, until the ground had dried out. So my garden went in almost a month late.  I was not able to put in spring lettuces, broccoli and other cool weather plants and seeds.  My good friend and one of the partners in Hive & Honey BEEpothecary, Steve Saum,  had planted indoors, tomato plants, early this spring for transplant.  He had given me 35 plants and then I had another 20 plant reseed themselves from last year.  My zucchini, summer and winter squash, melons, beans, and corn are just now reaching their peak  production of fruit.  So I have an abundance of gardening and fruits that need a home.  I have been giving away veggies to people in need, here in my community.  God is good and knew when this garden needed to be planted.  I had my ideas of when but, God’s timing and plans are always far better than mine.    Thank you God!  If you know someone in need, I have gifts!   Let me know!

So with an abundance of squash, I have made this recipes multiple times and finally revised it, to where I love it.

Honey zucchini butter bread

Honey Zucchini Butter Bread

Recipe makes 2 – 9×5 inch loaves

Ingredients

  • 3 cups self-rising flour

  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 3 eggs

  • 1 2/3 cups white sugar

  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil

  • 1/2 cup melted butter

  • 1/2 cup honey

  • 2 tablespoons vanilla extract

  • 3 cups grated unpeeled zucchini

  • 1 cup chopped walnut

  • 1/2 cup flaked coconut

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease two 9×5 inch loaf pans.

  2. Stir together the flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt in a bowl until blended. Set aside.

  3. Whisk eggs, sugar, oil, butter, honey, and vanilla together in a large bowl. Stir in zucchini, walnuts, and coconut. Add the flour mixture and stir until well combined. Divide the batter between the prepared loaf pans.

  4. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour. Cool completely. Store loaves overnight in plastic bags for best flavor.

Happy Eating and Harvesting!

Numbers 11:5

“We remember the fish we used to eat for free in Egypt. And we had all the cucumbers, melons, leeks, onions, and garlic

Which is better Agave or Honey?

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Agave vs. honey: Is one betterImage

Q. Is agave better than honey?

A. This is going to be our toughest food fight yet! Two natural sweeteners pitted against each other. Here we go:

  • Agave

Most agave nectar is produced from the blue agave plant grown in desert regions. The syrup is extracted from the “honey water” found at the core of the plant, filtered, heated and then processed to make it into the thicker nectar you see at the store. This makes agave a good sweetener for vegans who don’t eat honey.

Agave nectar has a dark amber color, but has a more neutral flavor than honey. One tablespoon of the sweetener has about 60 calories compared to about 45 and 60 in the same amount of granulated sugar and honey, respectively. It’s 11/2 times sweeter than sugar and so you can use less of it.

The media has hyped up agave because of its low glycemic index (GI of 17) compared with regular sugar (GI of 68) or even honey (GI between 60-74 depending on variety). This low-glycemic index has made agave a favorite among many diabetics. However, according to the American Diabetes Association, agave should be treated just like any sweetener and be consumed in limited amounts.

  • Honey

One tablespoon of honey has about 64 calories. The flavor of honey depends on where the bee collected its nectar. The darker the color, the more robust the flavor and the more antioxidants present. You also can find a variety of minerals like iron, copper, niacin, riboflavin, potassium and zinc.

Honey is sweeter than sugar so you don’t need as much when using it in a recipe. When substituting for granulated sugar, use lighter-colored (and milder-flavored) honey so it won’t overpower your recipe.

There’s also been some belief that eating local honey can help alleviate seasonal allergies. The theory stems from the facts that bees collect local pollen spores and that if we consume around a tablespoon a day, it could help build up immunity through gradual exposure.

 

This food-fight winner is honey. Agave is a bit more processed and has been over-hyped by the media and built up to be a super-sweetener, but it’s like all the others; use moderately.

Courtesy Toby Amidor on foodnetwork.com

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