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Propolis for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Ailments of the body

At times, too much to bear

Can bee treasures give relief

And help with repair?

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

We often get asked at show and festivals, if propolis can help with a particular ailment.  Sometimes, we know, but often we have to do some research by checking out the National Institutes of Health website – nih.gov, to see what studies have been done.  Such was the case a few months ago, when we were asked at WinterFair, if propolis could help with Crohn’s Disease.

We knew that the flavonoids in propolis are antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory, inside and out, so we set about looking for research.  While there are no recent studies with people, we did find some promising animal studies regarding propolis treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorders that represent the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These diseases affect the gastrointestinal tract, and their course is characterized by alternating periods of remission and flare-up.

A study was done in 2013 on rats with induced Crohn’s Disease. Two groups were treated  – one with a propolis water / alcohol extract enema and the other with mesalazine enemas.  Twelve days after the propolis administration, inflammation was reduced in 80% of the animals, 60% had moderate infiltrates and 20% had mild infiltrates. At this time, 60% of the animals treated with mesalazine still had dense infiltrates, 20% had mild infiltrates, and 20% no longer exhibited inflammation.

These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of the propolis treatment was slower, but its scope was wider because it encompassed a higher number of animals than did the mesalazine treatment. The anti-inflammatory effect of mesalazine was more rapid and more pronounced only in the animals that responded well to it (less than half of the treated population).  The inflammation persisted after 12 days of treatment with both drugs.

Rats with induced colitis were also treated with propolis and mesalazine, separately and together.   The scientists  concluded that both treatments are effective alone or in combination.  The anti-inflammatory effect of propolis was shown by the decreased intensity of the inflammation and reduction in number of cysts and abscesses.   They also found that these colitis treatments are more effective when used preventively, before the colitis flares up.

Use of Propolis Hydroalcoholic Extract to Treat Colitis Experimentally Induced in Rats by 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid  can be found at this site: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786476/

When pharmaceuticals fail to help or have risky side effects, propolis may be worth a try!

HEALTH –  POWERED BY BEES

Jeremiah 17

1Lord, you are the hope of Israel;  all who forsake you will be put to shame. 

Those who turn away from you will be written in the dust  because they have forsaken the Lord the spring of living water.

14 Heal me, Lord, and I will be healed; save me and I will be saved, for you are the one I praise. 

 

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BeeKeeper’s Conference Questions

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Traveled to Michigan, to vend our wares

Shared with other  beekeepers while we were there.

Learned some new things, taught some, too.

And had some good questions to find the answers to.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

We traveled to East Lansing Michigan this past weekend to attend the Michigan Beekeepers’ Conference at MSU.  We went last year and kind of consider it the birthplace of our new business.  It was during that weekend that we came up with a name and finalized ideas and direction for our bee products venture.  This year, we met up again with Laurie’s twin sis,Deb and her husband Ray, also beekeepers, to enjoy the conference together.  We also were vendors of our bee hive products at the event.

We had a great time learning from veteran beekeepers, spending time with friends, and sharing our passion for bee products with customers.  We had a few questions that we did not know the answers to, so I had to come home and do some research right away!  One question we had was from a lady who wanted to know what propolis product she could put in her eyes, to cure cataracts!  She said she had heard at one session that propolis could cure cataracts.  We told her emphatically that one should not put anything that is not 100% sterile and proven safe, in one’s eyes!  And that also goes for inhaling anything non-sterile into one’s lungs!   In all the research I had done, I had not seen anything about propolis and cataracts.

But I found it today.  However, propolis WAS NOT put into the eyes!  In a study using mice with a sodium-selenite- type of cataract, scientists injected propolis extract subcutaneously, for 3 days, along with the sodium selenite.  These mice did not develop cataracts like those injected with just the soium -selenite.  But again, this study was done on mice and on only one kind of cataract.  Not something I would recommend people try!

The other question we had was how much protein is in a tablespoon of bee bread.  This question came from a young man who must monitor his protein intake carefully.  I dug up some nutrition facts, so I could figure this out.  Here are the nutrition charts for pollen and honey, the components of bee bread.   1 TBS of our bee bread will have .9 grams of protein, 14.6 carbs, 60 calories and .07 grams of fat.  The Recommended Daily Allowance of protein is 56 grams per day for men and 46 grams per day for women.

Joshua 22

But be very careful to keep the commandment and the law that Moses the servant of the Lord gave you: to love the Lord your God, to walk in obedience to him, to keep his commands, to hold fast to him and to serve him with all your heart and with all your soul.”

Stan Scheller: The Forerunner of Clinical Studies on Using Propolis for Poor and Chronic Nonhealing Wounds

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

So many years, the word’s been hidden

Across the ocean, curtains closed.

Propolis’ power kept unbidden.

Bees’ best kept secret,

Should no longer be forbidden,

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

I am continuously amazed at the research I find about propolis.  My latest discovery is an article on the National Institute of Health Website, entitled, ” Stan Scheller: The Forerunner of Clinical Studies on Using Propolis for Poor and Chronic Nonhealing Wounds”.   This study was done back in the 1960’s and 70’s by a researcher in Poland, Stan Scheller.  He collected his own propolis and made extracts the same way we do.  He soaked propolis in alcohol, shaking it occasionally, for 4 days, then filtered it. He then used it to treat poor and chronic nonhealing

wounds.

In 1975, poor and chronic non-healing wounds, in 100 patients, were treated between 1972 and 1974.  The target group, consisted of 12 patients with burns, 30 with venous crural ulceration, 10 with local sacral bone pressure ulcers, 23 with suppurative osteitis and arthritis, 15 with suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and 10 with infected traumatic wounds. All the 100 patients, described in the research had been unsuccessfully treated in the previous hospitals. Some people had suffered with the wounds for months and years.  All the patients were treated with 3% ethanol propolis solution. The patients with osteitis and fistulas underwent wound rinsing every day, whereas on the rest of the patients the propolis extract dressings were applied, which were changed every day.

The use of propolis on many kinds of serious burns and wounds showed incredible healing results and this report shows amazing before-and-after pictures.  What amazes me is that nothing seems to have ever come of this!  Propolis showed 80-100% healing of the serious burns and wounds, except for bone infection, which I understand is one
of the most difficult to get rid of.   Just more proof of the amazing power of propolis.

To see this report and the incredible pictures and documentation, go to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3655617/

Psalm 91

If you say, “The Lord is my refuge,” and you make the Most High your dwelling,
10 no harm will overtake you, no disaster will come near your tent.
11 For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways;
12 they will lift you up in their hands,  so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.
13 You will tread on the lion and the cobra; you will trample the great lion and the serpent.

Honey for Healing – Powered by Bees!

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Honey, natural, gold and pure,

Yes, we love its sweet allure.

But did you know, there’s more for you

Coming from this sticky goo?

Not only is it tasty to devour

It can also heal cuts, sores and wounds

With its power.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

Honey, one of the valuable gifts from the beehive, is being used for more than just a yummy sweetener in food.  With two nurses in the family, I had heard my daughters talk about using honey- treated dressings on wounds and bedsores in hospitals and nursing homes here in Ohio. As I cared for my mother in her last days,  I asked every nurse and wound care specialist, in Kansas, if they were using medicinal honey. They all confirmed that yes, they were! Though none of them knew about the even more amazing benefits of propolis from the beehive, I was encouraged to hear that the natural healer, honey, was now widely accepted in the medical field. I’d like to share some information with you, documented with reliable research, on the medicinal uses of honey. I have paraphrased this information to be a little more understandable to us laypeople!   The entire article, “Understanding how honey impacts on wounds: an update on recent research findings”, by Abdul Seckam and Rose, complete with references to the research and a bibliography, is available at: http://www.woundsinternational.com

Wounds International Logo

Understanding how honey impacts on wounds: an update on recent research findings

Honey has been used for centuries in wound care as a topical antimicrobial agent. Licensed wound care products containing medical-grade honey first became available in 1999 and are now widely used. Honey’s therapeutic properties come from its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Laboratory evidence published in the past 5 years is helping the medical community understand how honey works to heal wounds and is now being integrated into modern medical practice. A range of medical honey products are available from several manufacturers for use on traumatic wounds, surgical incision sites, burns, sloughy wounds, and pressure ulcers.

Some researchers have criticised that clinical evidence to support the use of honey in the treatment of superficial wounds and burns was of low quality. By contrast, a review of 19 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a total of 2554 participants suggested that honey improved healing times in mild to moderate superficial and partial thickness burns when compared to conventional dressings. Another recent review of 33 RCTs noted that participants using honey had increased from 1965 in 2006 to 3556 in 2011, with a broadening in the range of wound types included, the choice of dressings available to clinicians, and the types of honey employed. Clinicians suggest that the effectiveness of different types of honey dressings used on similar wounds, be studied to test and compare the healing effectiveness of each.

Therapeutic properties of honey

Research has shown that honey has the following qualities: antimicrobial activity, deodorizing action, debriding action and osmotic effect, anti-inflammatory activity, antioxidant activity, and enhanced rate of healing. Essentially, honey can be regarded as an antimicrobial agent with the ability to promote wound healing.
Chemically honey is a complex substance whose antimicrobial components have been well established but , all honeys are not equal. Methylglyoxal was shown to contribute to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey, frequently used medicinally. Many honeys generate hydrogen peroxide on dilution, but manuka honey does not produce detectable levels and, as such, has been called a non-peroxide honey.

Honey has a broad spectrum of activity against bacteria and fungi. Gram-positive bacteria are

often involved in wound infection. Staphylococcus aureus – the most common cause of wound infection – has been shown to be inhibited by relatively low concentrations of honey. Antibiotic resistant strains, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VSE and VRE) have shown to be inhibited by honey. A recent study showed that the growth of 15 cultures of Streptococcus species isolated from wounds were inhibited by honey.

Of Gram-negative bacteria commonly implicated in wound infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric bacteria, Stenotrophomonas species, and Acinetobacter baumannii, have been shown to be susceptible to honey in vitro. Honey works in several ways to inhibit bacteria including: interrupting cell division, causing cell walls to break down, and damaging the bacteria’s DNA.

Patients with infected or highly exuding wounds may experience wound malodor. Honey has been shown to have a deodorizing effect in patients with malodorous wounds, which is probably due to the inhibition of bacteria. This trait is most notable within 24 hours of the application of honey to the wounds

Antimicrobial resistance to honey

With the introduction of new antimicrobials into clinical practice, the emergence of resistant strains of bacteria normally follows at some point. But experiments in which bacteria were exposed to low concentrations of manuka honey failed to select for honey-resistant strains. While these findings do not prove that bacterial strains won’t become resistant to honey in the future, they do suggest that the possibility is slight.

Debriding action of honey and osmotic effect

The role of honey in wound debridement ( the removal of dead tissue) has been described in research. Manuka honey was demonstrated to promote improved debridement, compared to a hydrogel.  Manuka honey reduces the PH in the wound, preventing the formation of nonviable tissue.
The osmotic effect (ability to attract and hold water) of honey has been thought to encourage lymphatic flow to devitalized tissue, while reducing bacterial load This promotes debridement by allowing substances to form in the wound that lower the quantity of nonviable tissue .

Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of honey

Wounds that do not progress through the usual phases of healing persist in a chronic inflammatory state caused by damaging chemicals and reactions in the wound. One way to interrupt this chronic inflammatory cycle is to remove free radicals with antioxidants and honey is known to contain antioxidants that scavenge free radicals. Although the anti-inflammatory effects of antioxidants in honey have been demonstrated in animal models, clinical studies are scarce, but it may be that these effects explain the benefits seen in treating burns with honey.

The future

The use of honey in modern wound care is still met with some skepticism. Since the advent of evidence-based medicine, changing clinical practice depends on providing clinicians with appropriate levels of evidence of clinical efficacy. Although honey has become a first-line intervention in some wound care clinics, larger and better designed studies are needed to cement the role of honey in modern wound care.

I have witnessed the healing effects of honey and propolis on wounds and sores. Honey and/or propolis have replaced triple antibiotic, burn ointment and other wound treatments in our family medicine cabinet, and they can in yours, too! Hopefully, research will continue to be done in this country, so Americans can further benefit from these natural treasures! Meanwhile, jump in and try out the healing resources – powered by bees!

Honey

 

 

 

 

 

Isaiah 45

3I will give you hidden treasures,   riches stored in secret places, so that you may know that I am the Lord,  the God of Israel, who summons you by name.
For the sake of Jacob my servant, of Israel my chosen, I summon you by name  and bestow on you a title of honor, though you do not acknowledge me.

I am the Lord, and there is no other;  apart from me there is no God.  I will strengthen you,  though you have not acknowledged me,
so that from the rising of the sun to the place of its setting people may know there is none besides me.    I am the Lord, and there is no other.

Propolis for Yeast Infections and Thrush

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

The mantra at our house

Whenever you’re sick

Is go take some propolis

It’ll fix you up quick!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Propolis is an organic composite product made by bees from resin  taken from conifer, pine and poplar trees.  Research is showing it can  treat both oral and vaginal Candida infections.  Killing excess fungus, soothing itchiness and avoiding the side effects of prescription yeast medication are among the benefits of using propolis for yeast infections   Another benefit of using propolis is that this natural substance promotes improved health overall.    The  phenolic acids and flavonoids in propolis help strengthen the body’s immune system and protect the body against bacteria, inflammation and cell oxidation.  For supportive research see the National Institutes of Health website – http://www.nih.gov/

Yeast infections can thrive when the body is low on probiotics. The yeast loses potency in the sustained presence of pinocembrin and acacetin, two flavonoids abundant in bee propolis.   Studies show pinocembrin act as a fungicide and bactericide. It also has the power to sooth swelling and anesthetize the body so that itching from the yeast infection is minimal.  Acacetin has also been shown to reduce inflammation caused by Candida.  The phytochemicals in propolis typically can clear up a yeast infection  in roughly one week. This is nearly equivalent to the duration of prescription drug treatments, which often take one to two weeks to prove effective.

Many users of propolis for Candida prefer the natural treatment to prescription drugs. Drugs typically used to treat yeast infections contain fluconazole, miconazole, clotrimazole or tioconazole. These ingredients have been linked to side effects ranging from burning sensations to bad odors and increased itchiness. Propolis for Candida often has no negative side effects, but may trigger allergic reaction in people allergic to bees or certain types of pollen.

To treat yeast infection,  use an extract form of propolis topically rather than orally.   Ingestion of propolis can often work, but studies mainly support targeted topical application.   Apply the propolis extract or salve  to the area infected by Candida, three to six times a day over a period of about a week.

Taken from a report on   http://www.bastyrcenter.org/content/view/979/

A propolis extract cleared thrush, an oral yeast infection caused by Candida albicans, as effectively as the standard antifungal medication, according to Phytotherapy Research (2005;19:652–4).  When a yeast infection occurs in the mouth, a condition commonly known as thrush, it is usually caused by the organism Candida albicans.

Thrush is most common in infants who have immature immune defenses; it can also occur in people who have diabetes, those with poorly fitting dentures, and people with a weak immune system due to cancer, Crohn’s disease, AIDS, or other serious illnesses.  Some people experience thrush after taking antibiotics, since these drugs disrupt the normal mouth flora and make it easier for candida organisms to multiply.https://beepothecary.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=798&action=edit Certain medications such as steroids and chemotherapy drugs also weaken the immune system and may increase the risk of developing thrush. In addition, Characterized by white patches on the tongue and insides of the cheeks that can be easily scraped off, the infection can spread to the palate, gums, throat, and eventually the respiratory and digestive tracts.

Eighteen adults with thrush due to poorly fitting dentures participated in the current study. Six were treated with nystatin, and the remaining 12 were treated with an extract of propolis. Both groups were instructed to dry the infected area of the mouth with a swab and apply either the nystatin or the propolis directly to it four times a day. After 15 days, the infection had disappeared in all people in both treatment groups.

Swishing propolis extract in the mouth 3-5 times a day, or adding it to a saline mouth rinse, will clear the oral thrush infection.  It also helps clear up canker sores, by applying directly to the sore several times a day.

Preliminary studies show that propolis might be an effective treatment for thrush and, moreover, it appears to be as effective as the antifungal medicine nystatin. Controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. It is noteworthy that many reports exist of allergic reactions to propolis. People should apply propolis to a small area of skin before using it in their mouth and discontinue use if a rash appears within 24 hours.

Another study, entitled, “Antifungal activity of propolis on different species of Candida”,  was carried out to test propolis on over 100 different strains of Candida, which causes yeast infections.  Patients who used a propolis tincture showed a decrease in the number of Candida.

This study can be found at the National Institute of Health website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11766101

For Propolis Products, go to:      mkt.com/beepothecary

Jeremiah 33

6 “‘Nevertheless, I will bring health and healing to it; I will heal my people and will let them enjoy abundant peace and security.

I will bring Judah and Israel back from captivity and will rebuild them as they were before.

I will cleanse them from all the sin they have committed against me and will forgive all their sins of rebellion against me.

Then this city will bring me renown, joy, praise and honor before all nations on earth that hear of all the good things I do for it; and they will be in awe and will tremble at the abundant prosperity and peace I provide for it.’