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Faithfulness – a Blessing to BEEpothecary

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Faithfulness, a quality sought

In  family, customers, friends.

They stick around during the hard times

Encouragement, they send.Delawaremay14

They keep us going

When we want to give up

Standing by, holding us up.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Faithful Customers, family and friends , you kept us going!  All during the few months we have received DAILY calls from you, our faithful customers, believers in all things BEE!  While we hated telling you that we did not have products for you at that time, we have to tell you that it is your phone calls that have kept us encouraged and pursuing getting up and running quickly!

Your calls and stories of health successes with bee propolis, continued to remind us of why we were doing this.  More than creating a small business that might provide us with a little extra income for retirement, our number-one desire is to passionately promote these incredible bee resources to help others discover and experience the many health benefits from hive products.

It is so exciting to hear your stories and build relationships with you all.  We thank you for support and encouragement over the last

Jeannie and Steve Saum, Peter and Laurie Dotson

Jeannie and Steve Saum, Peter and Laurie Dotson

few months!  We look forward to serving you with these incredible products, getting to know you better, and hearing your stories of

success – keep them coming!

Bless you,

Jeannie, Steve, Laurie, and Peter

 

P. S. My daughter turned me on to this suggestion that is going around on Facebook.  If you want to know what a true and faithful friend is, try putting a friend’s name in this verse, in the place of the word LOVE and its pronouns.  See if it rings true for that person in your life.

 When we consider you all, it does!

1 Corinthians 13

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.

It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.

Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth.

7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

Love never fails.

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Grand Re-Opening – BEEpothecary is Back!

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ANNOUNCING THE GRAND RE-OPENING OF

BEEpothecarybeepothecary products

Health, Skin and HairCare Products

with the amazing BEE PROPOLIS

and other hive resources, are available at

     www.mkt.com/beepothecary – online – mail order

or at BEEppothecary’s home office

 3320 Toy Road, Groveport, Ohio

call ahead for appointment – 1-614-450-2339


Coming Soon!

BEEpothecary will be available at our partner Store Fronts within the next few weeks! Stay tuned for the announcement!

 

State and Third Boutiques – Shoppes at Capitol Square

Urban Emporium – Main St.,  Bexley

Simply Vague – Polaris & Tuttle Malls

River’s Edge Cutlery – Hilliard

Garden Herb Shop – Canal Winchester

Blystone Farm Market – Oregon Rd., Canal Winchester

The Well, Lancaster

Joshua 6

Then the Lord said to Joshua, “See, I have delivered Jericho into your hands, along with its king and its fighting men.

March around the city once with all the armed men. Do this for six days.

Have seven priests carry trumpets of rams’ horns in front of the ark. On the seventh day, march around the city seven times, with the priests blowing the trumpets.

When you hear them sound a long blast on the trumpets, have the whole army give a loud shout;then the wall of the city will collapse and the army will go up, everyone straight in.”

15 On the seventh day, they got up at daybreak and marched around the city seven times in the same manner, except that on that day they circled the city seven times.

16 The seventh time around, when the priests sounded the trumpet blast, Joshua commanded the army, “Shout! For the Lord has given you the city!

17 The city and all that is in it are to be devoted[a] to the Lord.

20 When the trumpets sounded, the army shouted, and at the sound of the trumpet, when the men gave a loud shout, the wall collapsed; so everyone charged straight in, and they took the city. 21 They devoted the city to the Lord.

Summer of Swarms, Sales, Sweat, Snares, and Bee Wrangling

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Active heathy, hive box

Active heathy, hive box

Bees swarm

When we fail to brave the heat

To check on them

Chickens swoon to thieving raccoons

when doors don’t close in the dark

Cook and sell, travel and prosthelytize

Snare those bees, raccoons and possums

Wrangle some bees in the trees

All too soon, summer’s over.

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

BEEpothecary kept us so busy all spring and summer, that I haven’t written about our ventures and adventures in months.  It was a juggling act to keep up with the growing business and still take care of our bees and chickens!  With BEEpothecary, we did festivals and conferences in Delaware, Gahanna,  Oxford, Delaware Arts Festival Lithopolis, and Findlay, Ohio, and East Lansing and Frankenmuth, Michigan.  We spent a whirlwind three days in the Bee Pavilion at the Ohio State Fair and participated in Gay Street’s Moonlig20140905_113157ht Market several times. We also added products to three new stores and have had a wonderful increase  in online sales.  It is exciting and gratifying when people write or come back to see us and say, “Your products do exactly what you said they would do!” More important to us than anything else is that people can benefit from the amazing things made by bees, and that these products might help someone when nothing else has worked.

 

~   ~   ~   ~   ~

 

Since we lost allIMG_1450 our hives but one, between our two apiaries,  we needed to replace and rebuild this past spring.  Keeping the bees is integral to our business and mission.  We got 2 nucs in early spring for each family, that were bursting at the seams.  We had to take a last trip outIMG_1448 to Kansas right at this time, for the final clean out of my mom’s home, so Laurie and Pete had to install our nucs into full-sized hives, as well as their own.  Everything went fine until the last hive install at our house.  This nuc was full to the brim and hot!  Laurie got chased down the driveway, ripping her hat, veil and clothes off!  She ended up with several stings!

IMG_1448

~   ~   ~   ~   ~   2014phone 540

We also ordered two bee packages and Ohio queens for both families.  Pete and Laurie got some Russian bees to try another strain.  When we picked them up, we found that the Ohio queens had not been available.  Disappointing.

Pete and Laurie installed some of their bees in two top bar hives that took off well.  Pete had built them with viewing windows and it was neat to watch the bees  build and develop the hives.  But  in less than one  week after putting in our package bees, one of the Dotson’s hives just absconded!  They actually were outside and saw it happen.  Then didn’t swarm, they just flew into the air, swirled around for a bit and then took off into the beyond.  They were so disappointed.  It’s hard to see over $100 in bees fly off into Neverland!

~ ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~

The rest of our hives grew quickly, though, and we had a great spring and early summer.  And then the swarming started, en masse!  I think we had about 3 swarms a week for about 3 weeks in a row, between the Saums, Dotsons and our friends down the street.  Fortunately, the swarms landed nearby – mostly in our little trees out front, or in our son’s yard, next door to some beekeeping friends!

1413393049315

Steve and I were able to capture most of our swarms, since they landed in our little fruit trees.  Pete and Laurie had a few swarms, too, so we’d trade the swarms we caught and put them into hive boxes in the other apiary.  And for the swarms of our friends, that ended up in son, Nate’s, tall tree, so we had to call on him several times, to climb a ladder and capture a swarm!  Young adult sons are very handy.  We are so glad we let him live past 12 years old!!

Taking care of bees a hot sweaty job in the summer!  We aren’t brave enough to handle the bees without our gear on.  The extra layer – jacket, pants, helmet veil and gloves – makes quite a sweat box!  You can’t wipe your brow, your glasses slip down your nose, and you can’t take a drink of water without taking off your hat and veil!  We found we could only work on two or three hives at a time, and then take a break.  I don’t know how these beekeepers with 200+ hive, do it!

~   ~   ~   ~1414247547910   ~

Steve and Nate were even called upon twice, to come “wrangle” some bees in cut down trees.  They brought home two big logs full of bees, by screwing boards over each end to cover up the holes, loading them into the truck with a farmer’s front loader, or by brute strength, and bringing them home.  The ne20141015_131628xt step was to suck them out with a modified shop vac – a baffle to cut down on the suction so the bees didn’t end up – SPLAT! – on the inside of the shop vac.  But then an experienced beekeeper suggested just putting a hive box with a few honey frames in it on top of each log.  This would entice the bees and the queen to move up into the box and start laying there.  Much easier!  So that’s what we did.  We’re overwintering them this way!

Half way through the summer, one of the Dotson’s top bar colony’s just disappeared and shortly afterward, the other one was overcome by hive moths.  This was a disappointing loss to an interesting project.   It seems like we had swarms of swarms as the summer progressed!  When people asked us how many hives we had, we couldn’t remember, the number had changed so many times!  We got to  harvest honey mid summer and then again in early fall.  All in all, I think we ended up with over 400 pounds of honey!

And then there were the chicken adventures.  Laurie wanted more chickens and got pullets to raise in a box in the garage, 2 different times, two different ages. .  But once they got full-grown every time she tried to put the new ones in the coop with the old ones, all hell broke loose!  They pecked one poor little 2014phone 632hen to death, and Laurie called the combining effort quits.  This meant, she had to make a second coop for the younger birds, quick, since they had outgrown the box in the garage!  She made a stationary one out of pallets, that was really quite nice, but lacked a door.  In order to get eggs, or add water, she had to climb in and out of it each day!  Eventually she decided to get rid of the older birds to a good home and put the younger ones in the movable coop!

We, on the other hand, had a different kind of problem – predators.  Since we had 25 birds, we really didn’t notice for a few weeks that our flock was shrinking.  We saw no evidence of critters at first.  But then, one day, we found a

They always expect a treat and love popcorn!

They always expect a treat and love popcorn!

half-eaten chicken, in the coop, and realized that the automatic door was not closing at night and a critter was getting in.  By the time we realized this, we had lost 8 birds!  And of course this happened at a time we were scrambling to prepare product and running to shows. So I fixed the auto closer, while Steve got the live trap  ready!  It took only one night to snare a big, fat, well-fed raccoon!  We  read in the paper that week, that it was the season for all the young adult critters to leave their parents and head out on their own.  Evidently raccoons and possums were becoming a problem in town, too.  Interestingly, we read that it was against the law to relocate the critters!  Guess you are not allowed to pass your problem on to someone else!!  So, Steve dispatched that nasty, chicken-eating raccoon!

Since Pete and Laurie have a dog, they don’t have to worry much about critters getting to their chickens.  Rowdy usually takes care of wild critters who wander into his territory, and often brings his snared prize to the back door steps as a gift!  One day, he laid a big possum on the back steps and then lay inside  at the door, in the cool air conditioning “guarding: his catch outside!  And just before “Daddy” Pete came home, he moved his prize possum into Pete’s parking space in the driveway!  A proud hunter!  Thought sometimes, not too smart.  More than once, Rowdy unwisely tangled with a skunk and had to have many tomato juice and peroxide baths for his error! Never did see a prized skunk body on the back steps at the Dotsons’!IMG_1875

Somehow, we made it through the summer of swarms, sales, sweat, snares, and bee wrangling – with 12 hives (I think),  23 chickens, a growing business and a dear friendship still intact! Praise God for his blessings and strength!

2 Samuel 22

31“As for God, his way is perfect:  the e Lord’s word is flawless;  he shields all who take refuge in him.

32 For who is God besides the Lord?    And who is the Rock except our God?

33 It is God who arms me with strength  and keeps my way secure.

34 He makes my feet like the feet of a deer;  he causes me to stand on the heights.

35 He trains my hands for battle;  my arms can bend a bow of bronze.

36 You make your saving help my shield;  your help has made[i] me great.

37 You provide a broad path for my feet,  so that my ankles do not give way

 

 

Cleaning Propolis – an Update

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Psalms from the Hive

20150505_185603

raw propolis

by Jeannie Saum

Harvesting propolis from the hive – Like mining gold from ore.

Claiming what’s of value, According to the lore

Saving all the sticky goo, Picking out the chaff

What bees use to sterilize, We can use to heal a rash.

 

 Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

We have been taught a new way to clean propolis, from our beekeeper friend Dwight.  He has  hundreds of hives and supplies us with a lot of propolis!  So we are updating this post with the news information about how to clean propolis.  Messy, but much easier than hand picking out all the debris!

Two Ways to Collect Propolis

  1. propolis2From spare hive bodies and frames (pulled off for winter) – Scrape propolis from hive bodies and frames using a hive tool.  Do it outside or in the garage.
    • It’s good to put down a drop cloth, because propolis tends to chip off and fly everywhere.  Using a hive cover turned upside down, to work over, catches most of it and drop cloth will catch the rest.
    • Don’t scrape all the propolis from hive bodies the bees are using!  They need it to keep the hive healthy.  As you inspect, only scrape away propolis that is in your way, or prevents you from getting frames back down in in the box!  S ave this propolis, too.
  2. propolis trap

    scraping propolis from a propolis trap

    Propolis traps -Put trap on top box of frames and block up lid with stick or thumb tacks- You have to do this to let light in, so they will fill up holes to block light.  Otherwise it is just up against the cover and they won’t fill it.  No inner cover needed.

    • Once trap is full, pull off, put  trap in large trash bag, and put in freezer.
    • Once frozen, you can bend, twist and whack most of the propolis off the trap, inside the bag.  
    • You still may need to scrape or pick some out of the trap using a hive tool.

Storage

  •  Keep any propolis you collect in a plastic bag or closed container in the freezer until you have finished collecting and are ready to clean it.  
  • Try not to let it get too warm or it will glob together.  Much easier to clean when crumbly in little pieces.

To Clean Propolis

WORK OUTSIDE!  Remember, whatever you use to do this, (except the garden hose), you will never be able use for anything else.  It must be dedicated to cleaning propolis, because you will never get it completely clean! You will need:

  • hammer
  • strong plastic bags or several grocery store bags
  • tarp,
  • 5 gallon bucket
  • garden hose
  • strainer or a piece of window screen for straining
  • rubber gloves if you don’t want propolis strains on your hands or under your nails
  • second  piece of window screen for drying out the propolis on.

Steps to Cleaning

breaking up frozen propolis

breaking up frozen propolis

  1. Work outside!  Lay out place outside with tarp if needed – don’t want propolis all over your walk or concrete driveway!
  2. Take propolis baggies out of freezer.Put baggie in stronger bags (feed bags work well) or layers of bags.  
  3. On a hard surface, smash the frozen propolis into the smallest pieces you can.20160511_151835
  4. Put an inch of water in the 5 gal. bucket so propolis won’t stick to bottom and put smashed propolis in the bucket. 
  5. Use the garden hose to fill the pot with cold water. Swish the propolis around with your hands several
    times.  This frees up the debris – like bee parts, beeswax, wood shavings, paint, etc.  Most of this will float.

    straining out debris

    straining out debris

  6. Let the propolis settle to the bottom. Add water slowly to the top of the bucket. Then skim the debris off the top with a wire strainer or screen.
  7. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until no more debris floats to the top. ( You will never get ALL the debris out.  There may still be tiny pieces of paint or whatever.  This will be strained out in the infusing process)
  8. pouring propolis onto screen to dry

    pouring propolis onto screen to dry

    Pour off most of the water, leaving the propolis in the bucket.

    stirring propolis as it dries

    stirring propolis as it dries

  9. Place a piece of screen on a board, cookie sheet, or patio table and pour the propolis onto the screen, allowing the water to drain off and the propolis the dry. Every so often mix the propolis on the screen to help speed up dry process.
  10. Once completely dried, then put propolis in quart to gallon size freezer bag and freeze until ready to mail!

 

Selling Propolis

Call us to let us know you are ready to send propolis.  We pay $30 a pound for clean propolis.  Less if we have to clean it. 614-450-2339

Mail to:  BEEpothecary, 3320 Toy Road, Groveport, OH 43125

Please add a card or note with your name, phone number, address, and the weight of propolis you are sending.  We will inspect it, weigh it and then send you a check. If we have any question we will call you right away.

Making Your Own  Propolis Infusions

 

There are instructions on other posts on this blog site, that tell you how to make prop

infusing propolis at home

infusing propolis at home

olis oil or tincture.  Just search those topics to find our how-to.  Be forewarned from our own experience – making propolis at home for your own use is perfectly legal.  But in order to sell it, one must make it in an FDA/ODA ( or your state) certified production space, follow labeling laws for dietary

 

supplements, and let your state’s Dept. of AG. know what you intend to do.  Lots of hoops to jump through.

Be sure that whatever you use to make your own tincture or infused oil in, it needs to be a container you don’t care about and with utensils you don’t need to reclaim!  You won’t be able to ever get them clean again! Just plan on dedicating them to the making of propolis products.

And, you can reuse the propolis several times.  Just add a little more to replace the weight of what was infused in the first batch.  You can test the viability of propolis by putting a tsp. of the used propolis you’ve filtered out, into a cup of milk and let it sit out for 3-4 days.  If the milk doesn’t spoil, the propolis is still good.

Propolis Infusions

Propolis Infusions

If you don’t want to make your own, you can get the amazing benefits of propolis by purchasing any of our products.  Go to our online market using the link/tab at the top of the page.

Powered by BEES!

Deuteronomy 28 

1 “Now if you faithfully obey the Lord your God and are careful to follow all His commands I am giving you today, the Lord your God will put you far above all the nations of the earth.

All these blessings will come and overtake you, because you obey the Lord your God:

You will be blessed in the city and blessed in the country.
Your descendants will be blessed, and your land’s produce, and the offspring of your livestock, including the young of your herds and the newborn of your flocks.
Your basket and kneading bowl will be blessed. You will be blessed when you come in and blessed when you go out.

“The Lord will cause the enemies who rise up against you to be defeated before you. They will march out against you from one direction but flee from you in seven directions.

The Lord will grant you a blessing on your storehouses and on everything you do. He will bless you in the land the Lord your God is giving you.

The Lord will establish you as His holy people, as He swore to you, if you obey the commands of the Lord your God and walk in His ways.

10 Then all the peoples of the earth will see that you are called by Yahweh’s name, and they will stand in awe of you.

11 The Lord will make you prosper abundantly with children, the offspring of your livestock, and your land’s produce in the land the Lord swore to your fathers to give you.

12 The Lord will open for you His abundant storehouse, the sky, to give your land rain in its season and to bless all the work of your hands. You will lend to many nations, but you will not borrow.

13 The Lord will make you the head and not the tail; you will only move upward and never downward if you listen to the Lord your God’s commands I am giving you today and are careful to follow them.

14 Do not turn aside to the right or the left from all the things I am commanding you today, and do not go after other gods to worship them.

Propolis and Colon Cancer

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Active heathy, hive box

Active heathy, hive box

Life is hard, sometimes

But hold on to hope

And look for help

From God’s creations.

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

There are many studies found on the National Institutes of Health and GreenMedInfo websites regarding propolis and colon cancer.  The studies done in vitro (in a lab dish on cells) and on animals, show that propolis inhibits the growth of colon cancers sells in various ways.  Unfortunately, there are no clinical studies, as yet, on human beings, so this encouraging news is preliminary and needs further study.  Despite the limitations of the studies done so far, if I had cancer, I would certainly consider the use of propolis as an adjunct therapy  to whatever else was prescribed.

Here are summaries of some of the promising studies I have found.

“Chemoprevention of colon carcinogenesis by phenylethyl-3-methylcaffeate”, by Rao CV1, Desai D, Rivenson A, Simi B, Amin S, Reddy BS, states that previous studies have established that caffeic acid esters present in propolis, are potent inhibitors of human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth, carcinogen-induced biochemical changes, and preneoplastic lesions in the rat colon. The present study was designed to investigate the chemopreventive action of dietary phenylethyl-3-methylcaffeate (PEMC), from propolis,  on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis,the colonic mucosa and tumor tissues in male rats. At 5 weeks of age, groups of rats were fed the control diet, or a diet containing 750 ppm of PEMC. At 7 weeks of age, all animals except those in the vehicle (normal saline)-treated groups were given 2 weekly  injections of azoxymethane (cancer inducing agent). All groups were maintained on their respective dietary regimen until the termination of the experiment 52 weeks after the carcinogen treatment.

The results indicate that dietary administration of PEMC (from propolis) significantly inhibited the incidence and multiplicity of invasive, noninvasive, and total (invasive plus noninvasive) adenocarcinomas of the colon. Dietary PEMC also suppressed the colon tumor volume by 43% compared to the control diet. Animals fed the PEMC diet showed inhibited formation of colonic tumors by 15-30%. The precise mechanism by which PEMC inhibits colon tumorigenesis remains to be discovered.   Find this study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7757981

                                              ~  ~  ~

In a study from 2008,  titled,” Growth inhibitory activity of ethanol extracts of Chinese and Brazilian propolis in four human colon carcinoma cell lines”, by Ishihara M1, Naoi K, Hashita M, Itoh Y,  and Suzui M,  alcohol extracts of  Chinese and Brazillian propolis were tested on  four human colon carcinoma cell lines.  The findings indicate that the ethanol extracts of propolis contain components that may have anticancer activity.  Some cancers cells succumbed after only 72 hours of treatment.  Thus, propolis and related products may provide a novel approach to the chemoprevention and treatment of human colon carcinoma.  This study can be found at    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19578776.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“The contribution of plukenetione A to the anti-tumoral activity of Cuban propolis, by Díaz-Carballo D1, Malak S, Bardenheuer W, Freistuehler M, Peter Reusch H, studied Cuban propolis as a source of possible anti-cancer agents. The study found an anti-metastatic effect in mice and considerable cytotoxicity in both wild-type and chemoresistant human tumor cell lines. Plukenetione A– a component identified for the first time in Cuban propolis–induced G0/G1 arrest and DNA fragmentation in colon carcinoma cells.  This study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18951805.

                                              ~  ~  ~

inside the hive

inside the hive

A study from 1995, called , “Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces growth arrest and apoptosis of colon cancer cells via the beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling”, by Xiang D1, Wang D, He Y, Xie J, Zhong Z, Li Z, Xie J, the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (in propolis) on human colon cancer cells. Using two human sporadic colon cancer cell lines (HCT116 and SW480), they tested for cell growth inhibition, cell cycle and apoptosis induction.  Caffeic acid phenethyl ester completely inhibited growth, and induced G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in both HCT116 and SW480 cells.  Results of the study suggest that caffeic acid phenethyl ester merits further study as an agent against colorectal cancers.  The abstract of this study can be found at  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16926625.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“Greek propolis exhibits antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer cells”, done in 2010, by Harris Pratsinis, Dimitris Kletsas, Eleni Melliou, and Ioanna Chinou, tested  diterpenes and flavonoids, from Greek propolis, for their activities against human malignant and normal cell strains. They were found to be the most active against HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells, without affecting normal human cells.  this study is found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7757981.
                                              ~  ~  ~

“Chilean propolis: antioxidant activity and antiproliferative action in human tumor cell lines” published in 2004 by Russo A1, Cardile V, Sanchez F, Troncoso N, Vanella A, Garbarino JA. tested Chilean propolis for its antiproliferative capacity on KB (human mouth epidermoid carcinoma cells), Caco-2 (colon adenocarcinoma cells) and DU-145 (androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells) human tumor cell lines. Results showed that this Chilean propolis sample scavenged free radicals and inhibits tumor cell growth.  Find this study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15556167.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“Artepillin C in Brazilian propolis induces G(0)/G(1) arrest via stimulation of Cip1/p21 expression in human colon cancer cells”, from 2005, by Shimizu K1, Das SK, Hashimoto T, Sowa Y, Yoshida T, Sakai T, Matsuura Y, Kanazawa K. added Artepillin C (from propolis)  to human colon cancer cells. It dose-dependently inhibited cell growth.  Artepillin C appears to prevent colon cancer through the induction of cell-cycle arrest and to be a useful chemopreventing factor in colon carcinogenesis.

                                              ~  ~  ~

“Cytotoxicity of portuguese propolis: the proximity of the in vitro doses for tumor and normal cell lines” from 2014, states that  in vitro and in vivo data suggest that propolis has anticancer properties.  The phenolic extracts from Portuguese propolis  was evaluated using human tumor cell lines  – -breast adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, colon carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma, and non-tumor primary cells. The studied propolis presented high cytotoxic potential for human tumor cell lines. Propolis phenolic extracts comprise phytochemicals that should be further studied for their bioactive properties against human colon carcinoma. In the other cases, the proximity of the in vitro cytotoxic doses for tumor and normal cell lines should be confirmed by in vivo tests.

What I Want to Do When I Grow Up

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

gardening

gardening

What do I want to do when I grow up?

My answer always was

Grow flowers and herbs,

Make wreaths and such

But bees and chickens?

Not even a thought!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

For many, many,  years, as a second grade teacher, I did a get-to-know-you activity with my students during the first week of school.  We designed All About Me T-shirts (on paper), adding different pictures and details about ourselves, to share with other classmates.  One section was to draw a picture of what they wanted to do when they grew up.  I always did a shirt design, too, and the kids thought it was funny that I drew something for “what I want to do when I grow up”.  I explained to them, that mine referred to when I retired, and could choose what I wanted to do with that part of my life.  What did I draw?  – always something to represent herbs,  flowers, and wreaths.  I saw myself growing herbs and making dried arrangements and wreaths with my herbs and everlasting flowers – something I loved doing, but just never seemed to have time for while teaching.

chickweed to harvest

chickweed to harvest

So here I am, 2 years retired, and what do I find myself doing?  I’m out in the garden, planting and weeding and harvesting herbs and flowers!  But not for making wreaths and dried arrangements.  Instead, it’s for use use in our BEEpothecary products, to compliment the amazing bee propolis!  It hit me today, as I was out harvesting lemon balm, oregano,  calendula, comfrey, lovage, thyme, mint and yarrow,  that I AM doing pretty much what I said I wanted to do when I grew up!  Pretty cool!  Of course the beekeeping and making beehive products were not even a blip on the radar when I was teaching.  The beehive products and a business to boot, not even an idea in our minds when we first got bees!  We just wanted pollination for our gardens and some honey!  Little did we know that some reading and research would lead us in this direction.  Our BEEpothecary adventure is an exciting, unanticipated addition to this next phase of life.

I’ve used herbs myself medicinally, for years, when doctors couldn’t help me or traditional medicine didn’t work.  And I’ve grown herbs and flowers for decades, but never really did much with them, because I just didn’t have time.  The harvest usually came in late August, right when I was heading back to the grind of getting ready for a new school year.  This year, with a great

Starting our herb infused oils

Starting our herb infused oils

A big batch of lemon balm in olive oil

A big batch of lemon balm in olive oil

spring and summer of warmth and rain, I ‘ve been able to harvest my herbs once already,  and today – a beautiful 75 degrees – I was able to harvest them a second time.  And Laurie has quite a garden going, from which we will get even more herbs to use.   It’s a good thing, too, since our business has grown to the point that we are now making 5 gallon pickle buckets full of herb-infused oils!  We’re going to need a lot to get us through the winter months!  It gives me great satisfaction to be able to use these natural treasures to make useful skin care and health products that others can benefit from.  Making things from something you have helped grow with your own hands and sweat and toil, is quite satisfying.  And working with God’s bountiful and beautiful creations – the plants and the bees and the animals –  always leaves me awestruck.

Now tomorrow, the plan is to clean out the chicken coop, after practicing the deep bedding method all fall and winter and spring – which means nine

chickens?

chickens?

months of layers of straw, chicken poop, wood shavings and more chicken poop.  Now this task should be interestingly awful –  but awestruck, NO!  I will be donning my muck boots and gloves and probably a mask to do this!  But I guess it is the price to pay after benefiting from God’s little chickens and their yummy eggs for all these months.  I’ll let you know if I survive!

 

 

 

Jeremiah 29

10This is what the Lord says: “When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will come to you and fulfill my good promise to bring you back to this place.

11For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.

12Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you.

13You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.

14I will be found by you,” declares the Lord, “and will bring you back from captivity. I will gather you from all the nations and places where I have banished you,” declares the Lord, “and will bring you back to the place from which I carried you into exile.”

 

Beekeepers Have the Best Questions!

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Ohio State Beekeepers Association
Ohio State Beekeepers Association

Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Beekeepers together,

Learning from each other.

Trying to protect our bees

And reaping their treasures.

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

We attended the Ohio State Beekeepers’ Summer Conference in Oxford Ohio at Miami University last week.  We were able to learn from sessions we attended and Laurie and I (Jeannie) got to share our excitement and passion for propolis and other hive products in two sessions as well.  As usual, people come up with the “I wonder” questions that we can’t answer.  So I always come back from these meetings with things to investigate!

We had two interesting questions about propolis and our bee products.  One questions was whether or not propolis would help tinnitus (ringing in the ears).  The gentleman who asked this said that he had been told to take lipoflavinoids  for his tinnitus, and since we had mentioned that propolis and honey contain flavonoids, he wondered if these would help him.  Here’s what I found:

Lipoflavonoid is a proprietary, over-the-counter, dietary supplement formula created in 1961, by NUMARK Laboratories.  It is claimed by the manufacturer to improve circulation in the inner ear, as a means of combating tinnitus (ringing in the ears).   It is made with a bioflavonoid found naturally in the peel of lemons and also has vitamin B6 and B12 (B complex), vitamin C, niacin, riboflavin, thiamine, choline, inositol, and pantothenic acid.  ]There is significant anecdotal evidence that  Lipoflavonoid helps relieve the symptoms of tinnitus by consumers.   It has not been expressly approved by the Food and Drug Administration for this purpose.

So, as far as propolis being used in place of lipflavonoid, I would say it is not the same.  However, I did find some other references to propolis for tinnitus.  The following is from an Ezine Article:

Tinnitus is a symptom that can be caused by ear infections, foreign objects or wax in the ear, nose allergies that prevent fluid drain, aging, as a side effect of  medications, excessive noise exposure, or injury.

Bee propolis oil or tincture can be used orally, starting with a few drops and increasing each day to 25.  A mixture of garlic, alcohol, propolis and honey can be made and is said to be an effective home remedy to treat tinnitus. Put 200 grams by weight of alcohol (vodka) and ground garlic  into a lidded container (mason jar works well), cover tightly, shake and put it in a cool dark place.  Shake daily.   After 2 weeks, add 30 grams of propolis tincture and 2 tbs. of honey, to the garlic tincture and leave it for a few more days. Now the mixture is ready to treat tinnitus; drink few drops before having meal. Increase the number of drops with number of days.

I am not sure if any of this will work!  But it certainly can’t hurt.  Propolis has components that are shown to kill bacteria, viruses and molds, and it is also anti-inflammatory – which means it will reduce swelling and inflammation.  Besides trying it orally, I would suggest trying a few drops of propolis oil in the ears, once or twice a day.  If the tinnitus is related to any germ or inflammation, this might help.  It’s worth a try!

The second question we had from someone at the conference, was whether BEEpothecary’s Propolis Salve was safe for use with cloth diapers.  Being well beyond the child rearing years, I was not aware that some diaper creams can ruin the absorbancy of cloth diapers and not wash out in the laundry!   Who knew?!  I researched this on the web and found several blogs and forums on this subject!  According to what I read, from experienced cloth-diaper-using-moms – the ingredients in BEEpothecary Propolis Salve are all safe to use with cloth diapers.  The main  ingredients include olive oil, shea butter,  and beeswax.  These are all listed as safe for cloth diapers.

There was one other question asked in one of our sessions, that I can not for the life of me, remember!  If you were at one of our sessions, and asked a question not answered here, comment and let us know what it was.  I know a woman asked about the use of propolis for some disorder I had not researched, but I can’t remember what it was.  I would love to find our the information, if someone could jog my memory!

Job 5

“But if I were you, I would appeal to God; I would lay my cause before him.
He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted.
10 He provides rain for the earth; he sends water on the countryside.

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