Home

Garlic Scapes Pesto

Leave a comment

The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 
Garlic in the garden

Garlic in the garden

Sorry, No honey cooking today!  How about garlic.

For years, We had this strange plant growing in our garden.  At the time, I loved flower gardening. I had multiple large gardens in my yards.  I would add any new or throw away perennials people would give me.  And If I didn’t have room, I would make a new garden.  Big, Beautiful flower gardens. I had an oasis.

Every Spring and early summer, I would notice this plant. A hardy plant, that would grow a spiked shoot and then over night it would curl.  When it flowered, it has tiny little flowers and then it would grow these bulbs off the end.  Later the bulbs would drop and the next year I had more plants.  I loved the shape and the color. I would use them in flower arrangements and potted arrangements.  Still never knew exactly what I had.  Until one day, when I dig up a huge mound of them.     I eat everything.     So I took a deep swiff of it and then bit into it! Yeowzers! I had garlic! GARLIC!  All these years, I had Garlic. I love Garlic.  Garlic is a staple in my kitchen. It goes in everything I cook.  I could grow these, along with other herbs and make food for the family. But Vegetable gardening ? Never a consideration…until!

After a quick internet search on garlic. I learned how to care and grow garlic cloves.  I now have 200 garlic plants and that is where the garlic scapes come from.  What do you do with all your scapes??  Well we saute’ them with veggies, I roast them with meat, I cut them ups and add them to a salad… or I make this Garlic Scape Pesto is a great way to use something we get a whole heck of a lot of this time of year. When you grow two hundred heads of garlic, guess how many garlic scapes you get? That is correct – you get two hundred garlic scapes. That’s a lot.

Scapes are important to the garlic – it’s how more garlic plants happen. There are little seeds in the bigger round part, and if you leave the scapes in place, they would eventually burst open, scattering ripe seeds around, which will germinate and make more garlic plants. Unfortunately, in so doing, they draw nutrients away from the growing of the bulb they are on – and the bulbs are what is important to us. So, they all have to be cut off. And since we can’t stand to waste anything, we are working on finding ways to use them. They have great taste and very tender and the texture fabulous.  Get them early!

I cut a five gallon bucket full of these Garlic Scapes

I cut a five gallon bucket full of these Garlic Scapes

Fortunately, they are really wonderful in pesto, because we get all the great flavor and they get completely ground up, so texture isn’t an issue. And we LOVE pesto. I make as much of it as I can every summer and freeze it in ice cube trays to enjoy through the winter. Once the pesto is frozen solid, you can just pop the cubes out of the tray and store them in ziplock bags or other containers. You do want to have some trays dedicated solely to pesto and like substances though – the ice cube trays will absorb the flavor and pesto flavored iced tea is surprisingly un-tasty.

Garlic Pesto Ingerdents

Garlic Pesto Ingerdents

You will likely be able to find garlic scapes at your local Farmer’s Market this time of year, or maybe even in your CSA box. If you know someone who grows garlic, they might have some to share – they are worth looking for!

Garlic Scape Pesto

Serves: 1 & ½ cups
Ingredients
  • ½ cup chopped garlic scapes
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • ⅓ cup lightly toasted pine nuts or almonds
  • ½ cup fresh basil, packed tightly – then roughly chopped
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • kosher salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
  • ⅓ cup good quality olive oil
Instructions
  1. Add everything but the oil to the bowl of a food processor
  2. Process until everything is finely chopped and almost a paste.
  3. Leave the processor running and stream in oil
  4. It will only take a moment of two for the mixture to emulsify – turn off processor.
  5. Leave at room temperature for an hour or so to develop flavors- keep plastic wrap pressed to top surface to keep the top from turning brown.
  6. Can be stored in the refrigerator for several days, or can be frozen.

garlic scape pestoGarlic Scape Pesto is wonderful anywhere that you would use ordinary pesto – on vegetables, pasta, in sandwiches, topping a bowl of soup – just about anything, really. Experiment to find how you like to use it most!  I will be taking this on a camping trip with friends and using this in my dinner preparations.

Enjoy your Garden and Farm, and all it has to offer!

Laurie

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Luke 11:13 NIV  If you then, though you are not perfect, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

Like us on FB    https://www.facebook.com/BEEpothecary

Follow us on Twitter    https://twitter.com/BEEpothecary

Blessings for our Thanksgiving!

Leave a comment

Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

Thanksgiving has become one of my favorite holidays. An acquaintance wrote my sentiments to a tee and I would like to post them. So without further ado… She says, For weeks I look forward to preparing a beautiful meal and relaxing with my family. Sadly, Thanksgiving night invariably finds me deflated. I regret having gotten irritable in the final crazy minutes of gravy making and turkey carving or feel dispirited by the lack of meaningful conversation at the table. I miss the family members who are absent. I wish people would have gotten along better and connected more deeply. The list of discontents varies from year to year but the theme is the same: it didn’t turn out exactly as I had hoped.

This year I am on to myself. All month I’ve been thinking about letting go of my imaginary ideals and showing up with an open heart for whatever happens. I anticipate that it may be a little hard to pull off on the big day. I know I’m not alone. For many people the holidays are a time of heightened need for things to be a particular way. Certainly there’s nothing wrong with wanting a lovely holiday. But high expectations can hold us in their grip. What we want to see blinds us to what is actually in front of us and diminishes it. If we then distance ourselves from the imperfect, that gap makes it even harder to connect to things as they are. It is only in approaching a thing — be it this particular holiday meal or an individual human being — with attention that we can fully appreciate it, for all its faults and strengths, for all its funky uniqueness. Paying attention with kindness opens us to the wholeness around us. From there it is a short leap to gratitude. That which we see deeply enough can virtually always be counted as a blessing.

As we each look around our Thanksgiving tables next week, may we focus on the kindness and generosity that is shared between us and give thanks for the day we have been given, whether or not it is the one we had imagined.

Blessings on your holiday table.  Don’t forget to invite a friend or two who need a family to share this day with! 

Thanksgiving-Dinner-Turkey

Honey Roast Turkey

Turkey ingredients

  • 1  12 – 14  pound  fresh or frozen natural turkey
  • 2 cups  water
  • 1/2 cup  Hive & Honey BEEpothecary honey
  • 1/4 cup  finely snipped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons  finely snipped fresh sage
  • 2 tablespoons  snipped fresh thyme
  • 4 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon  olive oil
  • 1/2 kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup  Hive & Honey BEEpothecary honey
  • 2 tablespoons  butter
  •  Apple Cider Sauce (see recipe below) (optional)

directions

1.Thaw turkey if frozen. In a medium saucepan combine water, 1/2 cup honey, and about half of the parsley, sage, thyme, and garlic. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Stir in olive oil. Cover; let stand 30 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve; discard solids.

2.Rinse turkey; pat dry with paper towels. Skewer the neck skin to the back. Tie legs to tail. Twist wing tips under the back.

3.Place the turkey, breast side up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Using a flavor-injector syringe, inject the honey mixture into the meat of the turkey. (This may take up to 20 injections, so try to evenly distribute the seasoned mixture in the turkey. If the syringe gets clogged with a bit of seasoning, you will need to flush it out with water and a toothpick.) Sprinkle turkey lightly with salt and pepper.

4.Insert a meat thermometer into the center of one of the inside thigh muscles without the thermometer touching the bone. Cover turkey loosely with foil. Roast in a 325 degree F oven for 2-1/2 hours.

5.For glaze, in a small saucepan, heat and stir 1/4 cup honey and butter until butter is melted. Stir in remaining parsley, sage, thyme, garlic, salt, and pepper.

6.Remove turkey from oven. Cut the string between the drumsticks so the thighs will cook evenly. Remove the foil to let the bird brown. Brush about one-third of the glaze over turkey. Return turkey to oven and roast for 30 to 60 minutes more, brushing two more times with remaining glaze, or until meat thermometer registers 180 degrees F and juices run clear.

7.Remove turkey from oven and cover loosely with foil. Let stand for 15 minutes before carving. Carve turkey into thin slices and, if desired, serve with Apple Cider Sauce. Makes 18 servings.

Apple Cider Sauce

 ingredients

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons  butter
  • 3 tablespoons  flour
  • 1 1/2 cups  chicken broth
  • 1 cup  apple cider
  • 1/4 cup  Hive & Honey BEEpothecary honey
  • 2 tablespoons  cider vinegar
  •  Salt
  •  Pepper

directions

1.In a medium saucepan, cook onion in butter until tender. Stir in flour, broth, apple cider, honey and cider vinegar. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Cook and stir 1 minute more. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

From the Laurie and Pete Dotson and Jeannie and Steve Saum,

We wish you Great Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving Eating !

(P.S. Take your Propolis and Honey and stay healthy this holiday season!)

Psalm 95:2-3  Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song.  For the LORD is the great God, the great King above all gods.

Honey Garlic Vinaigrette

Leave a comment

Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

Garlic and Honey!  I have both of them ready to use in my cupboards, for all my recipes.  I love garlic so much, that I have 300 heads growing in my garden.  That is a lot of Garlic.  Last fall, I planted three different types of garlic to see if I can get garlic to grow the size of a baseball:)  If it happens I will be selling a lot of garlic. This is what garlic looks like in the garden:

The tops of garlic in the garden.

The tops of garlic in the garden.

The Honey comes from our hives.  We have four hives and two nucs in the back part of our property.  Nucs, Nucleus Hives or Nucleus Colonies, are small honey bee colonies created from larger colonies. The term refers both to the smaller size box and the colony of honeybees within it. The nuc hive is centered around a new queen  or queen cell.  We found eight queen cells in one of our hives. Which means a few things. One, the hive queen was weak and the nurse bees created a queen cell to replace the weak queen,  or Two, the  hive is full and crowded and the bees are getting ready to split and leave the hive (Swarm), or Three, the old queen might have died and they have created a new queen to rule the hive and make new brood (new bees).  So with that in mind, we knew we needed to do something. Using an existing 10 frame box. We created two nucs with three frames each in one ten frame sized box with dividers to separate them. Each nucleus has a frame of brood, a frame of capped honey and pollen and a empty frame for growth of the new colony.   We drilled a couple of holes in the box, so the forging bees can go out for food and working bees can keep the nuc clean.

Two nucs with three frames each in one ten frame sized box with dividers to separate them.

Two nucs with three frames each in one ten frame sized box with dividers to separate them.

So back to the Vinaigrette,  I love to make fresh dressings for my garden salads.

This one is one of my favorite dressing and one I serve all the time.  Each time I make it, I tweak it.

Honey Garlic Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • salt and pepper to taste

 Directions

  1. In a container, combine oil, vinegar, honey, salt, pepper and garlic. Cover, and shake until blended or blend to meld all the flavors. Set aside for 45 minutes, to allow flavors to combine. Shake again before serving.

Change up this recipe by:

  • Add Soy Sauce and Dijon Mustard- use as a marinade / salad dressing or
  • Roast the garlic before adding to recipe or
  • Add 6 garlic cloves and 6 Tbsp of honey- give your vinaigrette a sweet and spicy kick or
  • Change the apple cider vinegar to balsamic or champagne vinegar or
  • Add Italian spices or
  • Add 1/2 lemon, freshly squeeze and 2 tbsp grated onion- pour over fruit for a savory fruit dressing

This vinaigrette is the best go-to dressing in your recipe folder!  Make it and become the favorite cook at any neighborhood cook out!

Happy Eating!

Numbers 11:5
In Egypt we used to eat all the fish we wanted, and it cost us nothing. Remember the cucumbers, the watermelons, the leeks, the onions, and the garlic we had?