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Three Ways to eat with Propolis and BeeBread

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

Today is the first, real day where the weather felt like Fall.  I’m looking out my dining room window. Watching the limbs of my crabapple trees dip low to the ground, because they are loaded with heavy bright red, cherry size apples. Crabapple butter soon!   My favorite morning spread on buttered toast. yummy!  I’ll post that one, soon!

Ohio in September

 It’s been so busy today that I forgot to eat.  This really has gotten me to think about having healthy snack, ready to eat at a moments notice. And I’m not talking apples and carrot, which I do have, but something fun for my mouth.  Which made me think of  a conversation I had earlier in the day with a customer.  She has young, school age children who are feeling better, since they have been taking our Propolis oil.  But the girls are not crazy about the taste of Olive oil and Propolis. I don’t blame them. It’s not a taste that I crave either:) But like them, I do take it every day!  So I suggested she add the Propolis oil in a salad and if she bought some beebread she could add that t0 the girls morning oatmeal or in a yummy smoothie. Propolis tincture can be added to any fruit drinks. Added it to anything if you don’t want to take it straight down your throat.  She laughed and asked for some recipes.

First off…

If you don’t know what Propolis is, it’s a resin that the Honeybee gather from tops of trees bud and the bark. They mix it with their enzymes and then they plaster the whole inside of the hive.propolis in the hive

 It helps insulate the hive, it helps clean the hive and it protects the hive from bacteria and viruses.  This same Propolis that helps fight sickness in the hive, will also protect us from the the same viruses and bacteria floating and hanging about us.  Propolis icontains flavonoids that are anti viral, anti bacterial, anti microbial, anti fungal and an anti-inflammatory Propolis can be a great dietary supplement to enhance your overall health and boost immunity.

BeeBread is Pollen and Honey mixed together. BeeBread is filled with everything you need to energize your day, workout or recovery.  It is loaded with  vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein and iron that will benefit people of all ages and boost the immune system.

Flying about from flower to flower, bees collect pollen in the pollen baskets on their legs and carry it back to the hive. In the hive, pollen is used as a protein source necessary during brood-rearing. The pollen pellets and honey are combined and ferment until the the hard shell of the pollen is dissolve. At that time the bee will feast on it and feed it to their grwoing young.

So back to my phone conversation and my hungry stomach.  How can you get Propolis and BeeBread

into you daily route?  Here are a three recipes!

 Stay Healthy with the Power of BEES 

Basil Vinaigrette Dressing

Original recipe makes 1 -1/2 cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/2- 1 tsp of BEEpothecary Propolis Oil
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup BEEpothecary wildflower honey
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basiL
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

PREPARATION

  1. In a bowl, whisk together the olive oil, apple cider vinegar, honey, basil, and garlic. Pour over or toss with your favorite salad to serve

Pineapple Coconut Bitescoconut bites

INGREDIENTS

Makes: About 20 cookies

Active Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

INGREDIENTS

FILLING

  • 1 1/4 cups canned crushed pineapple, slightly drained
  • 1 tablespoon BEEpothecary honey
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

DOUGH

  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 6 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup unsalted cold butter
  • 3 tablespoons Propolis Coconut oil or Propolis Olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

PREPARATION

  1. To prepare filling: Spoon pineapple into a small saucepan with honey and cornstarch. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until thickened, about 3 minutes. Let cool.
  2. To prepare dough: Meanwhile, process almonds in a food processor until finely ground. Add confectioners’ sugar; process to combine. Add whole-wheat pastry flour and all-purpose flour; process to combine. Drop butter by the tablespoon through the feed tube, processing briefly after each addition. Add oil and pulse once or twice. Add coconut, cornstarch, salt and vanilla and process just until the mixture resembles crumbly, fine meal, but will hold together if pressed.
  3. Reserve a scant 1/2 cup of tart dough to use as crumbled topping.
  4. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line mini muffin pans with 20 paper cups.
  5. Drop a scant tablespoon of dough into each paper cup. Press the dough into the bottom and up the sides of the cup, making a well in the center, to form a miniature crust. Spoon 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons of the pineapple filling into each crust and top each with some of the reserved crumbs.
  6. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the crust is cooked through (watch carefully toward the end and move the pan to the bottom rack if the top begins to brown before the bottom crust is done), 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool in the pans.

 

 

No-Bake BeeBread Granola Bars beebread no bakes

INGREDIENTS

PREP TIME: 10 mins
COOK TIME: 5 mins
TOTAL TIME: 15 mins
Serves: 10 bars
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup packed dates, pitted  (dried plums or figs)
  • 3 Tbsp Flax seed
  • 1/4 cup BEEpothecary BeeBread 
  • 1/4 cup creamy salted natural peanut butter or almond butter
  • 1 cup roasted unsalted almonds, loosely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats (gluten free for GF eaters)
  • optional additions: chocolate chips, dried fruit, nuts, banana chips, vanilla, etc.
PREPARATIONbeebread no bake 2
  1. Process dates in a food processor until small bits remain (about 1 minute). It should form a “dough” like consistency. (mine rolled into a ball)
  2. Optional step: Toast your oats and flaxseed in a 350 degree oven for 15-ish minutes or until slightly golden brown. Otherwise, leave them raw – I toasted them
  3. Place oats, flax seed, almonds and dates in a bowl – set aside.
  4. Warm honey and peanut butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Stir and pour over oat mixture and then mix, breaking up the dates to disperse throughout.
  5. Once thoroughly mixed, transfer to an 8×8 dish or other small pan lined with plastic wrap or parchment paper so they lift out easily. (A loaf pan might work, but will yield thicker bars.)
  6. Press down until uniformly flattened. Cover with parchment or plastic wrap, and let set in fridge or freezer for 15-20 minutes to harden.
  7. Remove bars from pan and chop into 10 even bars. Store in an airtight container for up to a few days. I kept mine in the freezer to keep them extra fresh, but it isn’t necessary.
NOTES
*If your dates don’t feel sticky and moist, soak them in water for 10 minutes then drain before processing. This will ultimately help hold the bars together better.

Looking forward to seeing you soon, Laurie –

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Matthew 4:4

Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

What I Want to Do When I Grow Up

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

gardening

gardening

What do I want to do when I grow up?

My answer always was

Grow flowers and herbs,

Make wreaths and such

But bees and chickens?

Not even a thought!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

For many, many,  years, as a second grade teacher, I did a get-to-know-you activity with my students during the first week of school.  We designed All About Me T-shirts (on paper), adding different pictures and details about ourselves, to share with other classmates.  One section was to draw a picture of what they wanted to do when they grew up.  I always did a shirt design, too, and the kids thought it was funny that I drew something for “what I want to do when I grow up”.  I explained to them, that mine referred to when I retired, and could choose what I wanted to do with that part of my life.  What did I draw?  – always something to represent herbs,  flowers, and wreaths.  I saw myself growing herbs and making dried arrangements and wreaths with my herbs and everlasting flowers – something I loved doing, but just never seemed to have time for while teaching.

chickweed to harvest

chickweed to harvest

So here I am, 2 years retired, and what do I find myself doing?  I’m out in the garden, planting and weeding and harvesting herbs and flowers!  But not for making wreaths and dried arrangements.  Instead, it’s for use use in our BEEpothecary products, to compliment the amazing bee propolis!  It hit me today, as I was out harvesting lemon balm, oregano,  calendula, comfrey, lovage, thyme, mint and yarrow,  that I AM doing pretty much what I said I wanted to do when I grew up!  Pretty cool!  Of course the beekeeping and making beehive products were not even a blip on the radar when I was teaching.  The beehive products and a business to boot, not even an idea in our minds when we first got bees!  We just wanted pollination for our gardens and some honey!  Little did we know that some reading and research would lead us in this direction.  Our BEEpothecary adventure is an exciting, unanticipated addition to this next phase of life.

I’ve used herbs myself medicinally, for years, when doctors couldn’t help me or traditional medicine didn’t work.  And I’ve grown herbs and flowers for decades, but never really did much with them, because I just didn’t have time.  The harvest usually came in late August, right when I was heading back to the grind of getting ready for a new school year.  This year, with a great

Starting our herb infused oils

Starting our herb infused oils

A big batch of lemon balm in olive oil

A big batch of lemon balm in olive oil

spring and summer of warmth and rain, I ‘ve been able to harvest my herbs once already,  and today – a beautiful 75 degrees – I was able to harvest them a second time.  And Laurie has quite a garden going, from which we will get even more herbs to use.   It’s a good thing, too, since our business has grown to the point that we are now making 5 gallon pickle buckets full of herb-infused oils!  We’re going to need a lot to get us through the winter months!  It gives me great satisfaction to be able to use these natural treasures to make useful skin care and health products that others can benefit from.  Making things from something you have helped grow with your own hands and sweat and toil, is quite satisfying.  And working with God’s bountiful and beautiful creations – the plants and the bees and the animals –  always leaves me awestruck.

Now tomorrow, the plan is to clean out the chicken coop, after practicing the deep bedding method all fall and winter and spring – which means nine

chickens?

chickens?

months of layers of straw, chicken poop, wood shavings and more chicken poop.  Now this task should be interestingly awful –  but awestruck, NO!  I will be donning my muck boots and gloves and probably a mask to do this!  But I guess it is the price to pay after benefiting from God’s little chickens and their yummy eggs for all these months.  I’ll let you know if I survive!

 

 

 

Jeremiah 29

10This is what the Lord says: “When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will come to you and fulfill my good promise to bring you back to this place.

11For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.

12Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you.

13You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.

14I will be found by you,” declares the Lord, “and will bring you back from captivity. I will gather you from all the nations and places where I have banished you,” declares the Lord, “and will bring you back to the place from which I carried you into exile.”

 

Vote for Us – Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Your Vote is Needed!

Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

We posted our application to the Wells Fargo Small Business Contest. Please go to this website every day and vote for BEEpothecary. You can vote multiple time, just on different devices or log into WF multiple times. This will give us a chance to win $25,000 and mentoring for our business! Go and vote now!

Follow the Link to our Vote Page

Follow the Link Below to our Vote Page

 

https://wellsfargoworks.com/project?x=us-en_viewentriesandvote_1070

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie, Pete, Jeannie and Steve –

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1 Chronicles 4:10    Jabez cried out to the God of Israel, “Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.” And God granted his request.

Garlic Scapes Pesto

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 
Garlic in the garden

Garlic in the garden

Sorry, No honey cooking today!  How about garlic.

For years, We had this strange plant growing in our garden.  At the time, I loved flower gardening. I had multiple large gardens in my yards.  I would add any new or throw away perennials people would give me.  And If I didn’t have room, I would make a new garden.  Big, Beautiful flower gardens. I had an oasis.

Every Spring and early summer, I would notice this plant. A hardy plant, that would grow a spiked shoot and then over night it would curl.  When it flowered, it has tiny little flowers and then it would grow these bulbs off the end.  Later the bulbs would drop and the next year I had more plants.  I loved the shape and the color. I would use them in flower arrangements and potted arrangements.  Still never knew exactly what I had.  Until one day, when I dig up a huge mound of them.     I eat everything.     So I took a deep swiff of it and then bit into it! Yeowzers! I had garlic! GARLIC!  All these years, I had Garlic. I love Garlic.  Garlic is a staple in my kitchen. It goes in everything I cook.  I could grow these, along with other herbs and make food for the family. But Vegetable gardening ? Never a consideration…until!

After a quick internet search on garlic. I learned how to care and grow garlic cloves.  I now have 200 garlic plants and that is where the garlic scapes come from.  What do you do with all your scapes??  Well we saute’ them with veggies, I roast them with meat, I cut them ups and add them to a salad… or I make this Garlic Scape Pesto is a great way to use something we get a whole heck of a lot of this time of year. When you grow two hundred heads of garlic, guess how many garlic scapes you get? That is correct – you get two hundred garlic scapes. That’s a lot.

Scapes are important to the garlic – it’s how more garlic plants happen. There are little seeds in the bigger round part, and if you leave the scapes in place, they would eventually burst open, scattering ripe seeds around, which will germinate and make more garlic plants. Unfortunately, in so doing, they draw nutrients away from the growing of the bulb they are on – and the bulbs are what is important to us. So, they all have to be cut off. And since we can’t stand to waste anything, we are working on finding ways to use them. They have great taste and very tender and the texture fabulous.  Get them early!

I cut a five gallon bucket full of these Garlic Scapes

I cut a five gallon bucket full of these Garlic Scapes

Fortunately, they are really wonderful in pesto, because we get all the great flavor and they get completely ground up, so texture isn’t an issue. And we LOVE pesto. I make as much of it as I can every summer and freeze it in ice cube trays to enjoy through the winter. Once the pesto is frozen solid, you can just pop the cubes out of the tray and store them in ziplock bags or other containers. You do want to have some trays dedicated solely to pesto and like substances though – the ice cube trays will absorb the flavor and pesto flavored iced tea is surprisingly un-tasty.

Garlic Pesto Ingerdents

Garlic Pesto Ingerdents

You will likely be able to find garlic scapes at your local Farmer’s Market this time of year, or maybe even in your CSA box. If you know someone who grows garlic, they might have some to share – they are worth looking for!

Garlic Scape Pesto

Serves: 1 & ½ cups
Ingredients
  • ½ cup chopped garlic scapes
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • ⅓ cup lightly toasted pine nuts or almonds
  • ½ cup fresh basil, packed tightly – then roughly chopped
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • kosher salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
  • ⅓ cup good quality olive oil
Instructions
  1. Add everything but the oil to the bowl of a food processor
  2. Process until everything is finely chopped and almost a paste.
  3. Leave the processor running and stream in oil
  4. It will only take a moment of two for the mixture to emulsify – turn off processor.
  5. Leave at room temperature for an hour or so to develop flavors- keep plastic wrap pressed to top surface to keep the top from turning brown.
  6. Can be stored in the refrigerator for several days, or can be frozen.

garlic scape pestoGarlic Scape Pesto is wonderful anywhere that you would use ordinary pesto – on vegetables, pasta, in sandwiches, topping a bowl of soup – just about anything, really. Experiment to find how you like to use it most!  I will be taking this on a camping trip with friends and using this in my dinner preparations.

Enjoy your Garden and Farm, and all it has to offer!

Laurie

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Luke 11:13 NIV  If you then, though you are not perfect, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”

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Rhubarb Chutney

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

All I want to do is get my garden growing!  It’s all I have on my mind, these days.  Do I have all my seeds? Where are the shipments? Did I remember to buy non-GMO seeds? When can I get farmer Bud to till up the garden? Why am I so late, in thinking about all of these?  Potato SEEDS???? ugh!:(

 Yesterday, I was wandering around the yard, watching the clover grow and contemplating the future of my back yard. When I happened upon my wonderful rhubarb plant.

rhubarbplant

How lovely you are little, big plant!  I didn’t think of you and yet here you are. What a blessing:)

HEW_rhubarb_s4x3_lg

A good friend, a couple years ago, gave me a bit of hers. Now I have, this honkin’ mass of beautiful rhubarb.  Each stalk is at less, an inch in thickness and two feet long.  I pulled out the biggest and longest stalk and then took a bite off the end!  WoooDoggy was it tart!  I felt like a kid all over.

Growing up in Michigan, My mother always had a plant or two her garden or along a fence line. My sister’s and I would each get a cup of white sugar and a short rhubarb stalk and go to town on it.  Dipping the stack in the sugar and then gnawing on the sweet fibers to mix the two flavors.  Yummy!

A few days ago my daughter had a birthday. She loves rhubarb. So, I thought for her big Birthday Bash, I would make something with Rhubarb!  I came across multiple recipes and with a little experimenting, I made this for Hanna!

Happy Birthday HANNA!

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Rhubarb Chutney

rhub chut

rhubarb-chutney-sq

Rhubarb Chutney

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
4 tablespoons Honey
1/4 cup water
1 pound rhubarb stalks, sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

Directions:
Heat oil in a medium saute pan. Add the shallots, allspice, salt and pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until just softened. Add the ginger and cook 1 minute more.  Add the rhubarb, honey and water to the pan. Cook until the rhubarb is just tender — you don’t want it to fall apart.  Remove fruit heat and stir in red wine vinegar.

Serve atop chicken, pork or salmon, alongside bread or biscuits or paired with sharp white cheddar, Manchego or blue cheese.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

God has blessed us this week. I pray he will bless you with grace.

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12 NIV

PS I’m not a great blogger, but I do love passing on this love of all things delicious!  If my grammar, spelling and punctuation is not correct please forgive me. I pray you can see pass that and see you heart.

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Chicory and Arugula Salad with Honey Vinaigrette Recipe

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson
salad

The day has come for me to change my eating habits.  I’ve been trying to lose a few extra cheeky pounds.  Really, I’m ok with my weight and how I look, but when last years summer shorts are far to tight around my mid-section. It’s time to change something to drop a few inches off my girly waistline.

Yesterday, My husband took me to lunch at our friends new cafe’ .  It’s called The WELL!  They create amazing vegan salads, soup, glutenfree breads and treats along with their very own roasted coffee.   Lunch was delicious!  Should I try this???

So today,  I’ve decided to try my hand at veganizm.  Really, I need to go gluten-free!  I bet I would feel better but that means no more bread!!!!

 Oh Lord, you need to help this girl!  She can only do this, if  YOU help her!

OK!  I’m starting with salads that are tasted!

 I hate bland foods!  Did you hear me!  I hate bland diet foods!

This is going to be an interesting journey!  I hope I can get your support and ideas!

 

Chicory and Arugula Salad with Honey Vinaigrette Recipe

Some people like the bitterness of chicory and arugula, but in too large a quantity, the greens can be overwhelming. This straightforward salad tosses the bitter lettuces in a slightly sweet honey vinaigrette to balance things out. Add the crunch of toasted walnuts, and you’ve got a satisfying starter any day of the week.

This recipe was featured as part of  CHOW Easy Weeknight Dinner menu.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 medium head Belgian endive, coarsely chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1/2 small head radicchio, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 ounces baby arugula (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Combine the greens in a serving bowl and set aside.
  2. Whisk together the vinegar, honey, and measured salt and pepper in a small, nonreactive bowl. While constantly whisking, add the oil by pouring it in a thin stream down the side of the bowl. Whisk until all the oil is incorporated. Taste and adjust the seasoning as desired.
  3. Pour the vinaigrette over the reserved greens and, using your hands, mix to coat the salad. Taste and adjust the seasoning as desired. Top with the walnuts and serve.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

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2 Corinthians 1:11 …as you help us by your prayers. Then many will give thanks on our behalf for the gracious favor granted us in answer to the prayers of many.

Sweet Honey Lavender and Coconut Treats

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

IT’S Spring!  I love this time of year. It starts in February sometime…You know the weather! You open up the door, to what you think is going to be fridged, cold winter air, but you are surprised with a warm 50 degrees that you feel crosses your face. You begin to smell and hear the first signs of spring peeking into your backyard.

My dream Lavender garden:)

My dream Lavender garden:)

Let me repeat that in different words, the on and off of warm days, along with that sweet smell of purple flowers growing in your garden plots.  aahhh!  Such Sweetness!  lol

 So, I feel Spring is here, even though, the weather man says we  are getting a nor-eastern tonight.

Bring it on! One last hoorah, winter. ONE LAST HOORAH! I mean it!!!!

Spring brings herbs, plants and Lavender!!!  I am a fein for lavender! I love the smell, the look, and the feel that this little flower produces.  I’m getting ready for spring planting and I need little inspiration!  So here is a yummy sweet treat thats a bit on the unordinary but a lotta-bit on the delicious!

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Sweet Honey Lavender and Coconut Treats

honey lavender and coconut balls

INGREDIENTS

7 oz Package of Unsweetened Coconut Flakes

2 TBSP HONEY

1 cup Dried Plums or Figs – I used plums, because thats what I had in the cupboard.

1/4 cup Flax seeds

2 TBSP Chia seeds

1 TBSP Lavender buds

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Using a food processor,  blend the coconut into a powder, then add lavender and blend some more.  Then add figs or plums until well blended. Finally add the honey, flax seed and chia seed.  Finish by pulsing until well blended.  Ball up with a 1 Tbsp cookie scoop. place on platter and serve or scoop and place in sealed container and ‘frigerate.

I eat three of these with a glass of water as a mid-day snack!  This recipe is a great way to get protein, fiber, and antioxidants.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

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John 1:16    For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.

 

Swiss Chard with Honey-Roasted Garlic

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, Everyone!

Irish Blessing 

My Favorite Color is Green,  My Father and my husbands father, have ancestors from Ireland and Scotland.  We love to eat corn beef, sauerkraut and hash. We welcome a  good dark porter beer or a Guinness stout at our table.  As a child, I always wanted to see the end of a rainbow.  A few extra gold coins would have been a nice surprise for my folks.  Today, I’m happy right where I am.  I have an Unfailing Faith, good friends and family around, a wonderful husband to share life with and some good ole’ hard work, everyday!

Here are a few Irish proverbs

1. May the luck of the Irish be with you!

2. If you want praise, die. If you want blame, marry.

3. Here’s to a long life and a merry one. A quick death and an easy one. A pretty girl and an honest one. A cold pint and another one!

4. If you’re enough lucky to be Irish… You’re lucky enough!

5. May you have the hindsight to know where you’ve been, the foresight to know where you are going, and the insight to know when you have gone too far.

6. A man may live after losing his life but not after losing his honour.

7. “All the world’s a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.” – Sean O’Casey

8. You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your father was.

9. It is often that a person’s mouth broke his nose.

10. It is better to spend money like there’s no tomorrow than to spend tonight like there’s no money!

Tonight, I needed to come up with a dish that is green:)   So, I searched my pantry, ‘frigerator, chicken coop and garage..that’s where I store, last seasons garlic. I came up with an old favorite with a little twist of sweetness.

We are having a “not so” traditional St. Paddy’s day dinner. Instead we would like to celebrate with an American Irish Breakfast:  Eggs, corn-beef hash, fried bacon, sour dough bread,  coffee with St Brendan’s irish cream.

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Swiss Chard with Honey-Roasted Garlic

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 1.48.49 PM

INGREDIENTS

2 heads garlic
2 teaspoons HONEY
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons salted butter
2 tablespoons pine nuts
2 bunches (almost 2 pounds) Swiss chard, stripped of stems and cut into 1-inch pieces (10 cups)
Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    Cut the top 1/2 inch off each head of garlic, exposing the cloves. Set the garlic in the center of a square of heavy aluminum foil. Pour 1 teaspoon of the honey and 1 teaspoon of the olive oil over the garlic, replace the tops, and fold up the sides of the foil to make a package, crimping the top tight. Bake until very tender and golden, 40 to 45 minutes.

    Transfer the baked garlic to a bowl, including all the juices in the foil pouch. When cool enough to handle, remove the garlic heads and carefully pop out the garlic cloves by pushing up from the bottom; try to keep the cloves intact. Add the remaining teaspoon honey and tablespoon olive oil and gently stir to combine.Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 5.07.24 PM

  2. Heat a very wide skillet over medium heat, and add the butter and pine nuts. When they begin to sizzle and turn golden brown, add half of the Swiss chard. Cook, stirring, until the greens wilt, a minute or two. Add the remaining chard. Once all of the chard is wilted, season with salt and pepper, and cook until most of the liquid has simmered off, another 2 to 3 minutes.

    Add the honey-roasted garlic to the chard, mix very gently to combine, and serve.  you can also add chopped almond and cranberries to add a little crunch.  either way, you will have them coming back for more.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

John 1:16    For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.

 

We have a new name ~ BEEpothecary

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

What exciting times we are experiencing, these days!

We have officially changed our name to BEEpothecary

BEEpothecary logo w-tagline

from Hive & Honey BEEpothecary.

beepthecary logo

We found that people started to call us Hive and Honey.  There’s nothing wrong with that. Until you start searching the interweb for our company.  You will find other beekeepers around the U.S of A using hive and honey. We have one in our backyard… You will find a shoe company, lingerie store, boutiques, clothing brands, photography, jewelry and on and on carrying the Hive and Honey name.

We felt we needed to stand out more. We are a unique company that makes the most of Propolis in all of our Skin, Hair and Health Products.

honey bee coming atcha 2

What is Propolis, you ask?

Bees make propolis, which they use to glue the materials of their hives together, by mixing beeswax and other secretions with resins from the buds of conifer and poplar trees. Those resins have natural germicidal properties. For centuries, people have used propolis on wounds and as a remedy for ailments ranging from acne to cancer, osteoporosis, itching, and tuberculosis. Today, propolis is used in the manufacture of chewing gum, cosmetics, creams, lozenges and ointments and is being investigated as a dental sealant and tooth enamel hardener. A number of studies have tested its effectiveness in humans and animals as a treatment for burns, minor wounds, infections, inflammatory diseases, dental pain, and herpes. While promising, the results of these studies are preliminary.  However, propolis does have proven antibiotic and antiseptic properties and may also have antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects. I consider it safe and useful as a home remedy.

So… with a swipe of our wrists and the removing of just “Hive and Honey.”  This small deletion, will give us exactly, what were looking for.

A Name the Stands out all by itself.

Where did we come up with the name, you ask?

A year ago, we had a name and logo ready to be published.  It was Honey Bee Apothecary. A Great name! It says everything we wanted it to emphasize.  BEE’s, Honey and Hive Products with medicinal properties.  But, as we were attending a Beekeeper’s conference in Michigan.  My brother-in-law a licensed pharmacist, Raymond Rutkowski, threw us a curveball. He told us that in Michigan, only Pharmacist and/or Pharmacies can carry the “Apothecary” name.   We were to double check our research in the State of Ohio.  Low and behold, he was right and we were again searching for a new name for our company.  On the way home, to Ohio, after a great conference and short family reunion with my twin sister Deborah.  We stopped off at a watering hole to get some comfort food. We decided that a full stomach and blackberry cobbler would help us achieve the maximum level of creativity. AND Shazam!  A powerful force came upon my husband and he uttered these famous words “Let’s switch out the “A” for “B” and add “pothecary”. Making sure that we use two capital EE’s to showcase the BEE. Because the BEE’s make the medicine and they should get all the credit.”

After, almost, a year in business. We have found that we need to simplify our name. So today, We would like to introduce to you, our new name

BEEpothecary Logo headliner

and show case all of our value added hive products. With that being said I have a ton of work to do. Creating new labels for every product we have, changing out the old logo to the new, marketing our new names in social media and local businesses.  So, Keep you eyes out for us.  We are at Celebrate Local at Easton Towncenter, City folks Farm Store in Clintonville, The Well, down in Lancaster (opening soon). We have a couple of hopeful business in Canal Winchester. When the weather get nicer, we will be at Pearl Alley in downtown Columbus, friday mornings,  Moonlight Market on Gay Street- once a month, and multiple other venus that we will promote as we lock in our calendar.

Check out out Marketplace:  http://mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

Like us on Facebook!  Stop by and and pick up products that you need.

In honor of our Name Change.

I thought I would make Blackberry Jam

It’s very complicated. Stick with me and you will be amazed at your Jam making skills!!

Homemade BEErry Jam

INGREDIENTS

Chia Jam ingred 1

  • 1 Tablespoon Chia Seeds
  • 1 Cup Blackberries or mixed berries of your choice
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Gather all the ingredients, listed above. Then, put them into little glass bowls and place on a pretty cutting board. (You don’t have to do this. It just pretty to lay everything out – I feel like a professional TV chef when I do it.) If you do do it.  You midas well (might as well) take some pictures and post them to the interweb for ohhs and ahhs Wink!!Chia Jam ingred 2

  2. Now the hard part: Blend all ingredients in a blender, mixer, or a handblender, like the one I used.  Blend until well mixed and berries are pulverized. Chia Jam ingred combined

  3. Pour into Jam Jars and ‘frigerate over night. Chia Jam ingred compleste2

  4. Dish on to toast, yogurt, with ice cream,  or on crackers and cream cheese, if desired.

  5. Finally, you must smile while you enjoy your hard work!Chia Jam ingred complested

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Laurie

Genesis 9:3 ESV 
Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you. And as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything.
 

Honey Maple Beer Bread

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

With the start of this New Year being so cold and unpredictable. I thought a good recipe that is easy, warm and delicious would fit the bag!  A keeper it is!

I LOVE BEER!  I said it!  If I had a choice of wine or beer. Beer would be my pick!  Even though it’s the oldest fermented drink in the world, beer isn’t beloved by everyone and there is a fair sized group of people who just don’t like the taste of beer. Yet when everyone else around you continues to extol the virtues of every bottle of beer they’ve consumed, you might begin to wonder just what it is you’re missing out on. You may not believe it right now but to many people, good beer drinking experiences are akin to tasting fine wine or single malt scotch; indeed, one of the tests of a fine beer is that it does taste good. For you, liking the taste of beer may have to be an acquired approach but it can grow on you gradually through a better understanding of which beers might taste better (to you) and how to serve each beer so that it is at its optimal flavor. Perhaps it’s time to reacquaint yourself with beer and to find a taste in beer that does please you.

I do want to add, that if you have a problem holding your beer, or you know that alcohol is a problem in your life. This is not your excuse to start back up or continue on with your problem.
 

Back the the Recipe!  Beer does wonders for this bread, and the bread does not taste like beer. Most of the alcohol bakes off and what you’re left with is wonderfully textured bread, with great depth of flavor. The bread is about as sweet as storebought honey-whole wheat sandwich bread. Although there’s no whole wheat flour in the bread, it has a wheaty, nutty quality which I love,  courtesy of the beer.  I used one teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg, as well as a dash of molasses, all of which add warming undertones and little bursts of comforting flavors. They’re very subtle, but present. It’s the nutmeg that I notice most, and it plays wonderfully off the honey and maple.

I have to admit this post is stolen from another blogger!  averie cooks I can’t lie or at less very well! Two Thumbs up!!

It’s total comfort food and I loved it.

Effortless, goofproof, and tastes amazing.

honeybeerbread-9

 Honey Maple Beer Bread

This is some of the best bread I’ve ever made, and it’s definitely the easiest. No yeast, no-knead, no fuss. Simply combine all the ingredients in one bowl, pour beer over, stir, and bake. Foolproof, goofproof bread that’s ridiculously soft and moist. It doesn’t taste like beer and it’s safe to feed to kids.   Use it as French toast bread or for overnight French toast bakes. Serve it with soup, chili, dip it in hummus, or take the spices and flavor profile more savory by adding garlic or onion powder, curry, oregano, dill, or your favorites. Work-free, versatile, fabulous bread.

YIELD: 1 tall 9×5 loaf, about 12 thick slices

PREP TIME: 5 minutesCOOK TIME: 40 minutes

TOTAL TIME: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons light, mild, or medium molasses (not blackstrap)
1/4 cup local honey
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt, optional and to taste
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
12 ounces beer (I used a Honey Pumpkin Ale;  use your favorite beer)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F. Spray a 9×5-inch loaf pan with floured cooking spray, or grease and flour the pan; set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, add the first 9 ingredients (through baking powder). Tip: Measure the oil in a 1/4-cup measure, filling it halfway (there’s 4 tablespoons in 1/4-cup, so halfway is 2 tablespoons). By adding the oil first, it coats the measuring cup so the subsequent sticky ingredients (molasses, honey, maple) will slide right out.
  3. Slowly pour beer over the top. It will bubble and foam. Stir until combined. Batter is thick, gloppy, and dense.
  4. Turn batter out into prepared pan, smoothing the top lightly with a spatula. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until top is domed and set, and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean or with a few moist crumbs, but no batter. Allow bread to cool in pan for about 15 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Slice using a serrated knife. Bread is best fresh, but will keep airtight for up to 4 days. As the days pass, toasting it is recommended. Serving Ideas: with butter, hummus, olive oil and balsamic; eat is as toast, use as sandwich bread, dip in soup, use for French toast, dice day-old bread and bake for croutons or dice and make a French toast bake or bread pudding.
Deuteronomy 14:26

Use the silver to buy whatever you like: cattle, sheep, wine or other fermented drink, or anything you wish. Then you and your household shall eat there in the presence of the Lord your God and rejoice.

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