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Summer of Swarms, Sales, Sweat, Snares, and Bee Wrangling

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Active heathy, hive box

Active heathy, hive box

Bees swarm

When we fail to brave the heat

To check on them

Chickens swoon to thieving raccoons

when doors don’t close in the dark

Cook and sell, travel and prosthelytize

Snare those bees, raccoons and possums

Wrangle some bees in the trees

All too soon, summer’s over.

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

BEEpothecary kept us so busy all spring and summer, that I haven’t written about our ventures and adventures in months.  It was a juggling act to keep up with the growing business and still take care of our bees and chickens!  With BEEpothecary, we did festivals and conferences in Delaware, Gahanna,  Oxford, Delaware Arts Festival Lithopolis, and Findlay, Ohio, and East Lansing and Frankenmuth, Michigan.  We spent a whirlwind three days in the Bee Pavilion at the Ohio State Fair and participated in Gay Street’s Moonlig20140905_113157ht Market several times. We also added products to three new stores and have had a wonderful increase  in online sales.  It is exciting and gratifying when people write or come back to see us and say, “Your products do exactly what you said they would do!” More important to us than anything else is that people can benefit from the amazing things made by bees, and that these products might help someone when nothing else has worked.

 

~   ~   ~   ~   ~

 

Since we lost allIMG_1450 our hives but one, between our two apiaries,  we needed to replace and rebuild this past spring.  Keeping the bees is integral to our business and mission.  We got 2 nucs in early spring for each family, that were bursting at the seams.  We had to take a last trip outIMG_1448 to Kansas right at this time, for the final clean out of my mom’s home, so Laurie and Pete had to install our nucs into full-sized hives, as well as their own.  Everything went fine until the last hive install at our house.  This nuc was full to the brim and hot!  Laurie got chased down the driveway, ripping her hat, veil and clothes off!  She ended up with several stings!

IMG_1448

~   ~   ~   ~   ~   2014phone 540

We also ordered two bee packages and Ohio queens for both families.  Pete and Laurie got some Russian bees to try another strain.  When we picked them up, we found that the Ohio queens had not been available.  Disappointing.

Pete and Laurie installed some of their bees in two top bar hives that took off well.  Pete had built them with viewing windows and it was neat to watch the bees  build and develop the hives.  But  in less than one  week after putting in our package bees, one of the Dotson’s hives just absconded!  They actually were outside and saw it happen.  Then didn’t swarm, they just flew into the air, swirled around for a bit and then took off into the beyond.  They were so disappointed.  It’s hard to see over $100 in bees fly off into Neverland!

~ ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~

The rest of our hives grew quickly, though, and we had a great spring and early summer.  And then the swarming started, en masse!  I think we had about 3 swarms a week for about 3 weeks in a row, between the Saums, Dotsons and our friends down the street.  Fortunately, the swarms landed nearby – mostly in our little trees out front, or in our son’s yard, next door to some beekeeping friends!

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Steve and I were able to capture most of our swarms, since they landed in our little fruit trees.  Pete and Laurie had a few swarms, too, so we’d trade the swarms we caught and put them into hive boxes in the other apiary.  And for the swarms of our friends, that ended up in son, Nate’s, tall tree, so we had to call on him several times, to climb a ladder and capture a swarm!  Young adult sons are very handy.  We are so glad we let him live past 12 years old!!

Taking care of bees a hot sweaty job in the summer!  We aren’t brave enough to handle the bees without our gear on.  The extra layer – jacket, pants, helmet veil and gloves – makes quite a sweat box!  You can’t wipe your brow, your glasses slip down your nose, and you can’t take a drink of water without taking off your hat and veil!  We found we could only work on two or three hives at a time, and then take a break.  I don’t know how these beekeepers with 200+ hive, do it!

~   ~   ~   ~1414247547910   ~

Steve and Nate were even called upon twice, to come “wrangle” some bees in cut down trees.  They brought home two big logs full of bees, by screwing boards over each end to cover up the holes, loading them into the truck with a farmer’s front loader, or by brute strength, and bringing them home.  The ne20141015_131628xt step was to suck them out with a modified shop vac – a baffle to cut down on the suction so the bees didn’t end up – SPLAT! – on the inside of the shop vac.  But then an experienced beekeeper suggested just putting a hive box with a few honey frames in it on top of each log.  This would entice the bees and the queen to move up into the box and start laying there.  Much easier!  So that’s what we did.  We’re overwintering them this way!

Half way through the summer, one of the Dotson’s top bar colony’s just disappeared and shortly afterward, the other one was overcome by hive moths.  This was a disappointing loss to an interesting project.   It seems like we had swarms of swarms as the summer progressed!  When people asked us how many hives we had, we couldn’t remember, the number had changed so many times!  We got to  harvest honey mid summer and then again in early fall.  All in all, I think we ended up with over 400 pounds of honey!

And then there were the chicken adventures.  Laurie wanted more chickens and got pullets to raise in a box in the garage, 2 different times, two different ages. .  But once they got full-grown every time she tried to put the new ones in the coop with the old ones, all hell broke loose!  They pecked one poor little 2014phone 632hen to death, and Laurie called the combining effort quits.  This meant, she had to make a second coop for the younger birds, quick, since they had outgrown the box in the garage!  She made a stationary one out of pallets, that was really quite nice, but lacked a door.  In order to get eggs, or add water, she had to climb in and out of it each day!  Eventually she decided to get rid of the older birds to a good home and put the younger ones in the movable coop!

We, on the other hand, had a different kind of problem – predators.  Since we had 25 birds, we really didn’t notice for a few weeks that our flock was shrinking.  We saw no evidence of critters at first.  But then, one day, we found a

They always expect a treat and love popcorn!

They always expect a treat and love popcorn!

half-eaten chicken, in the coop, and realized that the automatic door was not closing at night and a critter was getting in.  By the time we realized this, we had lost 8 birds!  And of course this happened at a time we were scrambling to prepare product and running to shows. So I fixed the auto closer, while Steve got the live trap  ready!  It took only one night to snare a big, fat, well-fed raccoon!  We  read in the paper that week, that it was the season for all the young adult critters to leave their parents and head out on their own.  Evidently raccoons and possums were becoming a problem in town, too.  Interestingly, we read that it was against the law to relocate the critters!  Guess you are not allowed to pass your problem on to someone else!!  So, Steve dispatched that nasty, chicken-eating raccoon!

Since Pete and Laurie have a dog, they don’t have to worry much about critters getting to their chickens.  Rowdy usually takes care of wild critters who wander into his territory, and often brings his snared prize to the back door steps as a gift!  One day, he laid a big possum on the back steps and then lay inside  at the door, in the cool air conditioning “guarding: his catch outside!  And just before “Daddy” Pete came home, he moved his prize possum into Pete’s parking space in the driveway!  A proud hunter!  Thought sometimes, not too smart.  More than once, Rowdy unwisely tangled with a skunk and had to have many tomato juice and peroxide baths for his error! Never did see a prized skunk body on the back steps at the Dotsons’!IMG_1875

Somehow, we made it through the summer of swarms, sales, sweat, snares, and bee wrangling – with 12 hives (I think),  23 chickens, a growing business and a dear friendship still intact! Praise God for his blessings and strength!

2 Samuel 22

31“As for God, his way is perfect:  the e Lord’s word is flawless;  he shields all who take refuge in him.

32 For who is God besides the Lord?    And who is the Rock except our God?

33 It is God who arms me with strength  and keeps my way secure.

34 He makes my feet like the feet of a deer;  he causes me to stand on the heights.

35 He trains my hands for battle;  my arms can bend a bow of bronze.

36 You make your saving help my shield;  your help has made[i] me great.

37 You provide a broad path for my feet,  so that my ankles do not give way

 

 

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Vote for Us – Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Your Vote is Needed!

Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

We posted our application to the Wells Fargo Small Business Contest. Please go to this website every day and vote for BEEpothecary. You can vote multiple time, just on different devices or log into WF multiple times. This will give us a chance to win $25,000 and mentoring for our business! Go and vote now!

Follow the Link to our Vote Page

Follow the Link Below to our Vote Page

 

https://wellsfargoworks.com/project?x=us-en_viewentriesandvote_1070

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie, Pete, Jeannie and Steve –

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1 Chronicles 4:10    Jabez cried out to the God of Israel, “Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.” And God granted his request.

Rhubarb Chutney

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

All I want to do is get my garden growing!  It’s all I have on my mind, these days.  Do I have all my seeds? Where are the shipments? Did I remember to buy non-GMO seeds? When can I get farmer Bud to till up the garden? Why am I so late, in thinking about all of these?  Potato SEEDS???? ugh!:(

 Yesterday, I was wandering around the yard, watching the clover grow and contemplating the future of my back yard. When I happened upon my wonderful rhubarb plant.

rhubarbplant

How lovely you are little, big plant!  I didn’t think of you and yet here you are. What a blessing:)

HEW_rhubarb_s4x3_lg

A good friend, a couple years ago, gave me a bit of hers. Now I have, this honkin’ mass of beautiful rhubarb.  Each stalk is at less, an inch in thickness and two feet long.  I pulled out the biggest and longest stalk and then took a bite off the end!  WoooDoggy was it tart!  I felt like a kid all over.

Growing up in Michigan, My mother always had a plant or two her garden or along a fence line. My sister’s and I would each get a cup of white sugar and a short rhubarb stalk and go to town on it.  Dipping the stack in the sugar and then gnawing on the sweet fibers to mix the two flavors.  Yummy!

A few days ago my daughter had a birthday. She loves rhubarb. So, I thought for her big Birthday Bash, I would make something with Rhubarb!  I came across multiple recipes and with a little experimenting, I made this for Hanna!

Happy Birthday HANNA!

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Rhubarb Chutney

rhub chut

rhubarb-chutney-sq

Rhubarb Chutney

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
4 tablespoons Honey
1/4 cup water
1 pound rhubarb stalks, sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

Directions:
Heat oil in a medium saute pan. Add the shallots, allspice, salt and pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until just softened. Add the ginger and cook 1 minute more.  Add the rhubarb, honey and water to the pan. Cook until the rhubarb is just tender — you don’t want it to fall apart.  Remove fruit heat and stir in red wine vinegar.

Serve atop chicken, pork or salmon, alongside bread or biscuits or paired with sharp white cheddar, Manchego or blue cheese.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

God has blessed us this week. I pray he will bless you with grace.

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12 NIV

PS I’m not a great blogger, but I do love passing on this love of all things delicious!  If my grammar, spelling and punctuation is not correct please forgive me. I pray you can see pass that and see you heart.

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Chicory and Arugula Salad with Honey Vinaigrette Recipe

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson
salad

The day has come for me to change my eating habits.  I’ve been trying to lose a few extra cheeky pounds.  Really, I’m ok with my weight and how I look, but when last years summer shorts are far to tight around my mid-section. It’s time to change something to drop a few inches off my girly waistline.

Yesterday, My husband took me to lunch at our friends new cafe’ .  It’s called The WELL!  They create amazing vegan salads, soup, glutenfree breads and treats along with their very own roasted coffee.   Lunch was delicious!  Should I try this???

So today,  I’ve decided to try my hand at veganizm.  Really, I need to go gluten-free!  I bet I would feel better but that means no more bread!!!!

 Oh Lord, you need to help this girl!  She can only do this, if  YOU help her!

OK!  I’m starting with salads that are tasted!

 I hate bland foods!  Did you hear me!  I hate bland diet foods!

This is going to be an interesting journey!  I hope I can get your support and ideas!

 

Chicory and Arugula Salad with Honey Vinaigrette Recipe

Some people like the bitterness of chicory and arugula, but in too large a quantity, the greens can be overwhelming. This straightforward salad tosses the bitter lettuces in a slightly sweet honey vinaigrette to balance things out. Add the crunch of toasted walnuts, and you’ve got a satisfying starter any day of the week.

This recipe was featured as part of  CHOW Easy Weeknight Dinner menu.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 medium head Belgian endive, coarsely chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1/2 small head radicchio, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 ounces baby arugula (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Combine the greens in a serving bowl and set aside.
  2. Whisk together the vinegar, honey, and measured salt and pepper in a small, nonreactive bowl. While constantly whisking, add the oil by pouring it in a thin stream down the side of the bowl. Whisk until all the oil is incorporated. Taste and adjust the seasoning as desired.
  3. Pour the vinaigrette over the reserved greens and, using your hands, mix to coat the salad. Taste and adjust the seasoning as desired. Top with the walnuts and serve.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

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2 Corinthians 1:11 …as you help us by your prayers. Then many will give thanks on our behalf for the gracious favor granted us in answer to the prayers of many.

Sweet Honey Lavender and Coconut Treats

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

IT’S Spring!  I love this time of year. It starts in February sometime…You know the weather! You open up the door, to what you think is going to be fridged, cold winter air, but you are surprised with a warm 50 degrees that you feel crosses your face. You begin to smell and hear the first signs of spring peeking into your backyard.

My dream Lavender garden:)

My dream Lavender garden:)

Let me repeat that in different words, the on and off of warm days, along with that sweet smell of purple flowers growing in your garden plots.  aahhh!  Such Sweetness!  lol

 So, I feel Spring is here, even though, the weather man says we  are getting a nor-eastern tonight.

Bring it on! One last hoorah, winter. ONE LAST HOORAH! I mean it!!!!

Spring brings herbs, plants and Lavender!!!  I am a fein for lavender! I love the smell, the look, and the feel that this little flower produces.  I’m getting ready for spring planting and I need little inspiration!  So here is a yummy sweet treat thats a bit on the unordinary but a lotta-bit on the delicious!

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Sweet Honey Lavender and Coconut Treats

honey lavender and coconut balls

INGREDIENTS

7 oz Package of Unsweetened Coconut Flakes

2 TBSP HONEY

1 cup Dried Plums or Figs – I used plums, because thats what I had in the cupboard.

1/4 cup Flax seeds

2 TBSP Chia seeds

1 TBSP Lavender buds

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Using a food processor,  blend the coconut into a powder, then add lavender and blend some more.  Then add figs or plums until well blended. Finally add the honey, flax seed and chia seed.  Finish by pulsing until well blended.  Ball up with a 1 Tbsp cookie scoop. place on platter and serve or scoop and place in sealed container and ‘frigerate.

I eat three of these with a glass of water as a mid-day snack!  This recipe is a great way to get protein, fiber, and antioxidants.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

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John 1:16    For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.

 

Swiss Chard with Honey-Roasted Garlic

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, Everyone!

Irish Blessing 

My Favorite Color is Green,  My Father and my husbands father, have ancestors from Ireland and Scotland.  We love to eat corn beef, sauerkraut and hash. We welcome a  good dark porter beer or a Guinness stout at our table.  As a child, I always wanted to see the end of a rainbow.  A few extra gold coins would have been a nice surprise for my folks.  Today, I’m happy right where I am.  I have an Unfailing Faith, good friends and family around, a wonderful husband to share life with and some good ole’ hard work, everyday!

Here are a few Irish proverbs

1. May the luck of the Irish be with you!

2. If you want praise, die. If you want blame, marry.

3. Here’s to a long life and a merry one. A quick death and an easy one. A pretty girl and an honest one. A cold pint and another one!

4. If you’re enough lucky to be Irish… You’re lucky enough!

5. May you have the hindsight to know where you’ve been, the foresight to know where you are going, and the insight to know when you have gone too far.

6. A man may live after losing his life but not after losing his honour.

7. “All the world’s a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.” – Sean O’Casey

8. You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your father was.

9. It is often that a person’s mouth broke his nose.

10. It is better to spend money like there’s no tomorrow than to spend tonight like there’s no money!

Tonight, I needed to come up with a dish that is green:)   So, I searched my pantry, ‘frigerator, chicken coop and garage..that’s where I store, last seasons garlic. I came up with an old favorite with a little twist of sweetness.

We are having a “not so” traditional St. Paddy’s day dinner. Instead we would like to celebrate with an American Irish Breakfast:  Eggs, corn-beef hash, fried bacon, sour dough bread,  coffee with St Brendan’s irish cream.

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Swiss Chard with Honey-Roasted Garlic

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 1.48.49 PM

INGREDIENTS

2 heads garlic
2 teaspoons HONEY
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons salted butter
2 tablespoons pine nuts
2 bunches (almost 2 pounds) Swiss chard, stripped of stems and cut into 1-inch pieces (10 cups)
Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    Cut the top 1/2 inch off each head of garlic, exposing the cloves. Set the garlic in the center of a square of heavy aluminum foil. Pour 1 teaspoon of the honey and 1 teaspoon of the olive oil over the garlic, replace the tops, and fold up the sides of the foil to make a package, crimping the top tight. Bake until very tender and golden, 40 to 45 minutes.

    Transfer the baked garlic to a bowl, including all the juices in the foil pouch. When cool enough to handle, remove the garlic heads and carefully pop out the garlic cloves by pushing up from the bottom; try to keep the cloves intact. Add the remaining teaspoon honey and tablespoon olive oil and gently stir to combine.Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 5.07.24 PM

  2. Heat a very wide skillet over medium heat, and add the butter and pine nuts. When they begin to sizzle and turn golden brown, add half of the Swiss chard. Cook, stirring, until the greens wilt, a minute or two. Add the remaining chard. Once all of the chard is wilted, season with salt and pepper, and cook until most of the liquid has simmered off, another 2 to 3 minutes.

    Add the honey-roasted garlic to the chard, mix very gently to combine, and serve.  you can also add chopped almond and cranberries to add a little crunch.  either way, you will have them coming back for more.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

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John 1:16    For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.

 

BEE-Power – Propolis for Chickens and Other Feathered Friends

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Grown Up Girl

Propolis for feathered friends?

Absolutely!  It’s amazing!

Use it on their little legs

Or down their beaks

For soothing!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

If you don’t yet know what propolis is, from visiting our blog – here’s the short, sweet version.  Propolis is a  sticky  substance made by the honeybees from tree resin they collect from buds and bark.  They use it to sterilize their hive by coating all surfaces with it.  Over 50 years of research has shown that it has amazing healing effects – it is antibacterial, anti-fungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant.   It is used all over the world for its medicinal and healing properties.

Our website is dedicated to bringing you valid information about this amazing natural substance and citing research to back it up.  Recently, we had a question about using propolis for our pets and farm animals.  So, here is our first installment on propolis for animals – a   (rather dry) compilation of research on propolis’ use to treat birds – our feathered pets and poultry.  If you don’t need all the (paraphrased) medical jargon and cited research, just skip to the last two paragraphs for the down and dirty!

ParakeetPropolis is a safe anti-viral and anti-bacterial treatment that can be used with avians.  Its beneficial and safe action on the immune system make it useful as a  prophylactic  treatment, as well.   Propolis contains amino acids, vitamins and minerals, and can be a  valuable food supplement.
The Department of Biochemistry at Oxford University and School of Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton did studies on the use of propolis to treat avian  infections  caused by three types of bacteria – gram-positive Bacillus subtillis, gram negative E-coli and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.  Propolis was shown to be effective against these bacteria.

Herpes simplex type-1 (HSV-1) or a mutant strain, is thought to be  responsible for many herpes-type symptoms in animals and birds.   Scientific tests showed that propolis was three percent more effective against HSV-1 than “synthetic” drug treatment, without the harmful side effect!  The Oxford University report concluded that propolis may  have an important anti-inflammatory effect and that the substance  can strongly effect a positive immune and inflammatory response.

One hundred and six strains of S. aureus were tested with propolis  and all of them were susceptible to 0.5-1.0 mg propolis/ml.  Strains resistant antibiotics were also successfully treated with propolis (Shub, et al, 1981).  Propolis was shown to be effective against S. epidermidis  in a study by Glinnik and Gapanovich, 1981.CAM00001

The antiviral activity of propolis was shown as effective against some avian viruses  –  infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), reovirus (RV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), larngotracheitis virus (LTV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV). This study was carried out and reported by A. G. Hegazi1, F. K. Abd El Hady and A.A. Faraghli, Departments of Zoonotic Diseases and Chemistry of Natural Products, National Research Center, Dokki, Giza, Egypt and the Animal Health Research Institute, Dokki, Giza, Egypt, 2008.

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Studies on  Liver Protective in Chicken by  Giurgea et al. in 1981, 1982, 1984   and Giurgea et al ., 1982 reported that daily administration of a .02% propolis extract to chickens for 15 days increased plasma total protein and gamma -globulin content,  changed the blood concentration of cholesterol, transaminase (ALT & AST), amino acids, reduced  the glycogen level, and  increased  the myofibril, protein fraction and muscle total protein   They suggested  that propolis had an anabolic effect, which means the process of metabolism in which simple building blocks of energy are synthesized into the complex tissues of organisms. So in other words, propolis has a positive effect on the metabolism, helping to use energy to make new tissue.  Propolis also stimulates the body’s immune response.

In a study done by Teterev, in 1998, propolis was shown to protect against paratyphoid fever of ducks by feeding with a 50 % propolis water extract.  This study also showed wound healing with a 5% solution of propolis in oil.  In a study by Krell in 1996, propollis was shown effective in weight gain programs for  egg-laying hens.  Sforcin’s study in 2007 showed that propolis can stimulate higher antibody production, when used along with vaccines.

Fresh from the hen house!

Fresh from the hen house!

A study by Duran Ozkok, Kaan M. Iscan and Sibel Silici, 2013. Effects of Dietary Propolis Supplementation on Performance and Egg Quality in Laying Hens. Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 2013 showed that treating chickens with propolis did not cause any negative effect on performance, egg quality or survival rate. 

The Down and Dirty Summary

Propolis is being used by veterinarians and owners to treat pet birds and poultry  for infection, viruses, inflammation, gastrointestinal upset, lung conditions, skin conditions, wounds, and burns.  It is also being used as a health supplement, to increase immunity and as a preventative.  Propolis is a botanically-based, natural substance that is safe to use without the harmful side effects of artificially made medicines.  It does not affect the healthy organisms and tissue in the body while working against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and inflammation.

BEEpothecary Propolis Tincture

Hive and Honey BEEpothecary Propolis Tincture

Propolis tincture and infused oil (which can be found through “Our Products” page can be given to your feathered friends orally to treat internal ailments like gastrointestinal problems (vomiting, diarrhea), lung problems (coughing, wheezing) colds, and viruses or for preventative supplement. Our propolis tincture and oil is a 10% solution.  Since birds are considerably smaller,  1-4% solutions are what has been used in research cited.  Our recommendation is to dilute each dose with water – 1 part propolis tincture or oil to between 2.5 and  10 parts water.

                                     

                 example:  2 drops of propolis tincture and 5 drops of water = a 4% solution; 

                                   2 drops of propolis tincture and 20 drops of water = 1%

We are considering making  an animal strength propolis in the future, but for now, you’ll have to dilute our human strength propolis oil and tincture!   Propolis wound salve can be used on your birds externally for cuts, wounds, rashes and burns. It doesn’t matter if the origin is bacterial, viral or fungal – propolis will take care of it all!Propolis & Herb Wound salve

So, the next time your pet bird or poultry is sick – try propolis!

HEALTH – POWERED BY BEES – for our feathered friends, too!

Psalm 8

Lord, our Lord,   how majestic is your name in all the earth! You have set your glory in the heavens.
Through the praise of children and infants  you have established a stronghold against your enemies,  to silence the foe and the avenger.
When I consider your heavens,  the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars, which you have set in place,
what is mankind that you are mindful of them,  human beings that you care for them?

You have made them a little lower than the angels  and crowned them with glory and honor.
You made them rulers over the works of your hands; you put everything under their feet:
all flocks and herds, and the animals of the wild,

the birds in the sky,  and the fish in the sea, all that swim the paths of the seas.

Lord, our Lord,  how majestic is your name in all the earth!

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