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Rhubarb Chutney

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

All I want to do is get my garden growing!  It’s all I have on my mind, these days.  Do I have all my seeds? Where are the shipments? Did I remember to buy non-GMO seeds? When can I get farmer Bud to till up the garden? Why am I so late, in thinking about all of these?  Potato SEEDS???? ugh!:(

 Yesterday, I was wandering around the yard, watching the clover grow and contemplating the future of my back yard. When I happened upon my wonderful rhubarb plant.

rhubarbplant

How lovely you are little, big plant!  I didn’t think of you and yet here you are. What a blessing:)

HEW_rhubarb_s4x3_lg

A good friend, a couple years ago, gave me a bit of hers. Now I have, this honkin’ mass of beautiful rhubarb.  Each stalk is at less, an inch in thickness and two feet long.  I pulled out the biggest and longest stalk and then took a bite off the end!  WoooDoggy was it tart!  I felt like a kid all over.

Growing up in Michigan, My mother always had a plant or two her garden or along a fence line. My sister’s and I would each get a cup of white sugar and a short rhubarb stalk and go to town on it.  Dipping the stack in the sugar and then gnawing on the sweet fibers to mix the two flavors.  Yummy!

A few days ago my daughter had a birthday. She loves rhubarb. So, I thought for her big Birthday Bash, I would make something with Rhubarb!  I came across multiple recipes and with a little experimenting, I made this for Hanna!

Happy Birthday HANNA!

Don’t for get to Check out our Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

Rhubarb Chutney

rhub chut

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Rhubarb Chutney

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
4 tablespoons Honey
1/4 cup water
1 pound rhubarb stalks, sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

Directions:
Heat oil in a medium saute pan. Add the shallots, allspice, salt and pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until just softened. Add the ginger and cook 1 minute more.  Add the rhubarb, honey and water to the pan. Cook until the rhubarb is just tender — you don’t want it to fall apart.  Remove fruit heat and stir in red wine vinegar.

Serve atop chicken, pork or salmon, alongside bread or biscuits or paired with sharp white cheddar, Manchego or blue cheese.

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God has blessed us this week. I pray he will bless you with grace.

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12 NIV

PS I’m not a great blogger, but I do love passing on this love of all things delicious!  If my grammar, spelling and punctuation is not correct please forgive me. I pray you can see pass that and see you heart.

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Honey Maple Beer Bread

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

With the start of this New Year being so cold and unpredictable. I thought a good recipe that is easy, warm and delicious would fit the bag!  A keeper it is!

I LOVE BEER!  I said it!  If I had a choice of wine or beer. Beer would be my pick!  Even though it’s the oldest fermented drink in the world, beer isn’t beloved by everyone and there is a fair sized group of people who just don’t like the taste of beer. Yet when everyone else around you continues to extol the virtues of every bottle of beer they’ve consumed, you might begin to wonder just what it is you’re missing out on. You may not believe it right now but to many people, good beer drinking experiences are akin to tasting fine wine or single malt scotch; indeed, one of the tests of a fine beer is that it does taste good. For you, liking the taste of beer may have to be an acquired approach but it can grow on you gradually through a better understanding of which beers might taste better (to you) and how to serve each beer so that it is at its optimal flavor. Perhaps it’s time to reacquaint yourself with beer and to find a taste in beer that does please you.

I do want to add, that if you have a problem holding your beer, or you know that alcohol is a problem in your life. This is not your excuse to start back up or continue on with your problem.
 

Back the the Recipe!  Beer does wonders for this bread, and the bread does not taste like beer. Most of the alcohol bakes off and what you’re left with is wonderfully textured bread, with great depth of flavor. The bread is about as sweet as storebought honey-whole wheat sandwich bread. Although there’s no whole wheat flour in the bread, it has a wheaty, nutty quality which I love,  courtesy of the beer.  I used one teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg, as well as a dash of molasses, all of which add warming undertones and little bursts of comforting flavors. They’re very subtle, but present. It’s the nutmeg that I notice most, and it plays wonderfully off the honey and maple.

I have to admit this post is stolen from another blogger!  averie cooks I can’t lie or at less very well! Two Thumbs up!!

It’s total comfort food and I loved it.

Effortless, goofproof, and tastes amazing.

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 Honey Maple Beer Bread

This is some of the best bread I’ve ever made, and it’s definitely the easiest. No yeast, no-knead, no fuss. Simply combine all the ingredients in one bowl, pour beer over, stir, and bake. Foolproof, goofproof bread that’s ridiculously soft and moist. It doesn’t taste like beer and it’s safe to feed to kids.   Use it as French toast bread or for overnight French toast bakes. Serve it with soup, chili, dip it in hummus, or take the spices and flavor profile more savory by adding garlic or onion powder, curry, oregano, dill, or your favorites. Work-free, versatile, fabulous bread.

YIELD: 1 tall 9×5 loaf, about 12 thick slices

PREP TIME: 5 minutesCOOK TIME: 40 minutes

TOTAL TIME: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons light, mild, or medium molasses (not blackstrap)
1/4 cup local honey
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt, optional and to taste
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
12 ounces beer (I used a Honey Pumpkin Ale;  use your favorite beer)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F. Spray a 9×5-inch loaf pan with floured cooking spray, or grease and flour the pan; set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, add the first 9 ingredients (through baking powder). Tip: Measure the oil in a 1/4-cup measure, filling it halfway (there’s 4 tablespoons in 1/4-cup, so halfway is 2 tablespoons). By adding the oil first, it coats the measuring cup so the subsequent sticky ingredients (molasses, honey, maple) will slide right out.
  3. Slowly pour beer over the top. It will bubble and foam. Stir until combined. Batter is thick, gloppy, and dense.
  4. Turn batter out into prepared pan, smoothing the top lightly with a spatula. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until top is domed and set, and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean or with a few moist crumbs, but no batter. Allow bread to cool in pan for about 15 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Slice using a serrated knife. Bread is best fresh, but will keep airtight for up to 4 days. As the days pass, toasting it is recommended. Serving Ideas: with butter, hummus, olive oil and balsamic; eat is as toast, use as sandwich bread, dip in soup, use for French toast, dice day-old bread and bake for croutons or dice and make a French toast bake or bread pudding.
Deuteronomy 14:26

Use the silver to buy whatever you like: cattle, sheep, wine or other fermented drink, or anything you wish. Then you and your household shall eat there in the presence of the Lord your God and rejoice.

Old Fashion Bread Pudding with a Honey Vanilla Sauce

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

The Lord came down tonight and took my soul back to heaven, when I bit into this bread pudding.  haha!  Holy Moly, what a great recipe. Tonight is my husband’s birthday. He does not like any hype to this event.  I ask him every year what he would like to do for his big day.  And every year, for 28 years, I hear the same thing.  ” A roast dinner at home with the kids”. Done!  But this year, I just had to change it up a bit. We will finish off our dinners with a amazing bread pudding for dessert.   A special thanks to a friend of ours, Bev Haun. She FaceBook’d me this recipe.  It’s a Redneck Recipe! I’ve never considered myself a redneck, but a hilljack, that I might be:)  So this HillJack, she done, changed up the rec’pe just a tater and it, is, scrumptious!  I would invite ole’ Bev and her husband over, but they live way, down in Cincinnati.:)  i’ll eat extra for you.. Hugs!   So Happy Birthday Petie!

breadpudding

HillJack Bread Pudding with a Honey Vanilla Sauce

INGREDIENTS

  • • 4 cups (8 slices) cubed white bread• 1/2 cup raisins

    • 2 cups milk

    • 1/4 cup butter

    • 1/3 cup Hive & Honey BEEpothecary Honey

    • 2 eggs, slightly beaten

    • 1 tablespoon vanilla

    • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

    Sauce Ingredients:

    • 1/2 cup butter

    • 1/4 cup honey

    • 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar

    • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

    • 1 tablespoon vanilla

    Directions for Pudding:

    Heat oven to 350°F. Combine bread and raisins in large bowl. Combine milk and 1/4 cup butter in 1-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat until butter is melted (4 to 7 minutes). Pour milk mixture over bread; let stand 10 minutes.

    Stir in all remaining pudding ingredients. Pour into greased 1 1/2-quart casserole. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until set in center.

    Directions for Sauce:

    Combine all sauce ingredients except vanilla in 1-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until mixture thickens and comes to a full boil (5 to 8 minutes). Stir in vanilla.

    To serve, spoon warm pudding into individual dessert dishes; serve with sauce. Store refrigerated -Fashioned Bread Pudding with Vanilla Sauce

    Happy Eating !

Romans 5:2-5 Through him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God. More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.

Artisan Bread with Honey

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

What is better then hot bread, straight out of the oven and dowsed with cold butter?   Nothing !!!!!

It’s raining today and the house is dark and a little chilly, so what do I do?  Bake!!! Bake delicious bread.   I use my go-to-recipe, Artisan bread in five minutes.  I have changed it up a little.  I add honey to give the bread a bit of sweetness and it helps keep the wonderful hard crust from becoming rock hard:)  It makes three to four loaves per recipe.  When I have dinner parties, this is the most requested dish, BREAD!   So today, I made two loaves of bread. Then the rest of the dough will be made into pizza tomorrow.  Jeannie actually gave me this recipe and bought me my first cookbook by Jeff Hertzberg, M.D. and Zoë François.  If your a bread lover as we are, these are must have cookbooks.

Try this recipe and you will be a convert:)

Artisan Bread with a little Honey

http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/

3 cups lukewarm water

1 tbsp Honey

1 1/2 tablespoons granulated yeast (2 packets)

1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt or 1 1/2 tablespoons other coarse salt

6 1/2 cups flour, unsifted, unbleached, all-purpose

Directions:

Preparing Dough for Storage:.

  1. Warm the water slightly. It should feel just a little warmer than body temperature. Warm water will rise the dough to the right point for storage in about 2 hours. With cold water it will need 3-4 hours.

  2. Add Honey and the yeast to the water in a 5 quart bowl or, preferably, in a resealable, lidded (not airtight) plastic food container or food-grade bucket. Don’t worry about getting it all to dissolve.

  3. Mix in the flour and salt – kneading is unnecessary. Add all of the flour at once, measuring it in with dry-ingredient measuring cups, by gently scooping up the flour, then sweeping the top level with a knife or spatula. Don’t press down into the flour as you scoop or you’ll throw off the measurement. Mix with a wooden spoon, a high-capacity food processor (14 cups or larger) fitted with the dough attachment, or a heavy duty stand mixer fitted with the dough hook until the mixture is uniform. If you’re hand mixing and it becomes too difficult to incorporate all the flour with the spoon, you can reach into your mixing vessel with very wet hands and press the mixture together. Don’t knead, it isn’t necessary. You’re finished when everything is uniformly moist, without dry patches. It takes a few minutes, and will yield a dough that is wet and loose enough to conform to the shape of its container

  4. Allow to rise. Cover with lid (not airtight or it could explode the lid off). Allow the mixture to rise at room temperature until it begins to collapse (or at least flattens on the top), approx 2 hours, depending on room temperature, and initial water temperature Longer rising times, up to 5 hours, won’t harm the result.

  5. You can use a portion of the dough any time after this period. Fully refrigerated dough is less sticky and easier to work with than dough at room temperature.

On Baking Day:.

  1. prepare your loaf tin, tray, or whatever you’re baking it in/on. Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with four. Pull up and cut of a grapefruit-size piece of dough (c 1 lb), using a serrated knife.

  2. Hold the mass of dough in your hands and add a little more flour as needed so it won’t stick to your hands. Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all 4 sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. Most of the dusting flour will fall off – that’s fine, it isn’t meant to be incorporated. The bottom of the loaf may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will sort itself out during resting and baking.

  3. The correctly shaped final product will be smooth and cohesive. The entire process should take no more than 30 – 60 seconds.

  4. Rest the loaf and let it rise in the form, on the tray/pizza peel, for about 40 minutes Depending on the age of the dough, you may not see much rise during this period. That’s fine, more rising will occur during baking.

  5. Twenty minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 450°F Place an empty broiler tray for holding water on any other shelf that won’t interfere with the rising bread.

  6. Dust and Slash. Dust the top of the loaf liberally with flour, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a quarter inch deep cross, diagonal lines, or tic-tac-toe pattern on top using a serrated knife.

  7. After a 20 min preheat you’re ready to bake, even though the oven thermometer won’t be at full temperature yet. Put your loaf in the oven. Pour about 1 cup of hot water (from the tap) into the broiler tray and close the oven to trap the steam.

  8. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the crust is nicely browned and firm to the touch.

  9. Store the rest of the dough in the fridge in your lidded (not airtight) container and use it over the next 14 days. The flavour and texture improves, becoming like sourdough. Even 24 hours of storage improves the flavour.

This is the standard bread. There are loads of variations – both savory and sweet – in the book.

Happy Eating

Leviticus 26:4 ESV  Then I will give you your rains in their season, and the land shall yield its increase, and the trees of the field shall yield their fruit.