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Fall in the BEE Yard

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

 

Cooler nights and shorter days, 

Bring out jeans and sweaters

And change our ways.

The honey bees,

Make changes too.

Bringing in nectar,

Making lots of goo!

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Fall is officially here and the nights are getting cooler but the daytime temperatures are unpredictable! The temperature can range from high 80’s to somewhere in the 50’s. We never know what to expect! But the bees’ activities this time of year, are always the same. It is time for them to get ready for the coming winter. In the fall, the bees work hard to get a last load of flower nectar into their hive, to make their honey-food for winter. The nectar comes mainly from goldenrod and asters this time of year, giving the fall honey a darker color and bolder taste, For some of us, it is the favorite of all!

20150531_144157If there is an abundance of nectar flowing and not too much rain, the bees will be able to fill up lots of frames of nectar, which they will fan with their tiny wings, to evaporate it down to sweet, dark, flavorful honey. And if they make more than what they need for winter (typically about 100 pounds), they we get to pull some honey frames off for us!! We can’t wait! The bees also collect lots of resin from the trees and use it to make extra propolis in the fall. They will use this sticky goo to seal the hive for winter, filling all the cracks and crevices with globs of propolis and covering all the surfaces with a thin layer. Propolis also kills bacteria, viruses and molds that might be present in the hive, keeping it sanitary and healthy as they hsteve-at-toyead into winter.

We made a trip out to our bee yards this week, to check on our bees and see if there was any fall honey for us.  We found some hives thriving and some sort of struggling along.  We took notes and made plans to check again in a few weeks whenjeannie-scraping the goldenrod and aster nectar flow is over.  Then, we might need to feed some of the smaller hives, to help them build up their stores for winter.  We noted some smaller hives  that may have difficulty making it through the winter.  We are thinking about trying the 2 queen method where you  place a weaker hive atop a stronger hive with 2 queen excluders and a box of honey between them.  Combining them this way allows the worker bees  from both hives to pass through the excluders to get around both hives to move take care of larvae, move honey stores around and help take care of both queens.  We will get out into our apiaries at the beginning of November to decide this, and to prepare our hives for winter.

We also found about 5 boxes of honey we can pull in a few weeks, once it is capped. We are excited about having sweet dark fall honey!   The boxes we pull off are in addition to the honey we will leave for the bees. They will need between 80 and 100 pound to eat during th
e winter so they have energy to shiver their flight muscles, generating heat to keep the queen at 93 degrees all winter!

And our best discovery working in our bee yards was finding several hives that are making tons of propolis. On one hive it was dripping down the sides!   7-oz-propolis-one-hiveWe got 7 ounces  – mostly from one hive – that was in our way and had to be removed.  Most beekeepers would be cursing it and tossing
it over their shoulder into the grass after scraping it off.  But we celebrate because we know how precious it is as a natural health substance.  It’s like gold, to us.  Our gift from the bees.  We have read propolis-isnlidscores and scores of research on propolis and know it has shown to be antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant.  We will use our propolis to make dietary supplements, skin care, shaving products, soaps, and lip balms, all fortified with propolis, because we want everyone to know about propolis and be able to have access to it.

Powered by BEES!

 

TO ALL BEEKEEPERS:

What are you doing with your propolis?  Don’t throw it away!  

Since you have to clean your hives anyway, why not make some money doing it!

We buy propolis by the pound. Save it in baggies as you clean up your equipment.  

Store it in the freezer and call us when you have a pound or more.

We will email you the instructions on how to clean it and give you a price.

We also buy: Beeswax, Honey and Pollen!

Email us:BEEpothecary@gmail.com

1 Peter 1:6-8

In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials.

These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.

Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy,

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Honey and Propolis on bee stings

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson

What a weekend! Pete installing nucs IMG_1448 Pete and I picked up four Honeybee Nucs, from our friends John George and Terry Eddy, in Plain City, OH. You ask, what are Nucs? I’ll tell you what they are. Nucs are small honey bee colonies created from larger colonies. The term refers both to the smaller size box and the colony of honeybees within it. The name is derived from the fact that a nuc hive is centered around a queen – the nucleus of the honey bee colony. Pete installed our two in our bee yard, while I assisted. It went great so, we decide this is the way to go instead of buying 3 lbs packages of bees. Before we finished in the Bee yard, we feed the new family members sugar and water. Now we let them do what they do best. BEE stuff!

IMG_1450

Nucs with five frames full of bees and a queen

Then we took the other two Nucs to Steve and Jeannie Saum’s bee yard, to install them into empty hives. Pete gets started on the first hive and I start on the second one. Pete’s hive was calm, gentle and easy to install. I opened my box of bees. You would have thought a volcano erupted, with an over flowing of bee lava. All of a sudden, I have bee stinging me through my gloves and clothes. The worst thing that can happen, happens.

My worst nightmares come to life. Two or three bees find their way up into my veil. I can feel one crawling on my neck and   then   comes the  “bleeping” sting.  Holy, moly! it hurts and the burning begins. It’s at that point, I need to get my veil off, while remaining calm. I had no idea how many bees were on me.  I’m telling you it felt thousands of buzzing, angry honeybees ramming into me, diving at me and into my hair, swarming around my head and body!  I started to leave the bee yard to free myself of my veil…I try to  stay calm …walking …STAYING calm… walking faster…then I panic and break into a “run for my life” kind of a run.  I’m running down the Saum’s neighbor’s driveway, heading towards their house.  I’m screaming and whacking at every buzzing noise I hear. Whacks to my face, head, body, arms and legs. That’s when I start ripping my clothes off to rid myself of the bees clinging to my jacket and clothes. I had bees stuck in my hair, crawling up my shirt, and down my under clothes. I ran for the carport to redress and to figure out what the heck,  just happened.  I still had a ton of bee following me.  uugh!

Pete is still watching me and looking at the eruption that just happened. Those bees wouldn’t even let Him install them.  So we left those HOT honeybees for the night and decided to come back the next morning.

ALL in all, I was only stung five times.  One on my neck, two on my wrist, one on my armpit and one on top of my head.   At home, I get out the BEEpothecary Propolis Oil to help with pain and inflammation.  I felt so much better, but few hours later my wrist was swollen, very hot and in painful. At this point, I put on the BEEpothecary Wound Salve, because I know it has soothing and healing herbal oil, in addition to,  propolis. Within a few minutes I feel better and now I can sleep.

The next day, we returned to the angry bees and opened up the box. First thing, Peter gets stung.  We decide to leave them again, only this time with the lid off the box, to let them cool down… A few hours later, with a smoker that was heavily smoking. We were able to install the bees, feed them sugar and leave without a bite.

Whew!  That is done!  I would do it again, because our bees are vanishing and without bees we won’t have food!

We Thank God for the honeybees and all the opportunities we have been given because of them.

Thank you, to each of person who have bought our products, listened to us talk about Bees and BEEpothecary!  We appreciate you and your feed back!  We have been given this moment, to help and promote health through the honeybees.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings from Laurie and Pete –

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

Psalms 40: 4-5

Blessed is the one who trusts in the Lord, who does not look to the proud, to those who turn aside to false gods.  Many, Lord my God, are the wonders you have done, the things you planned for us. None can compare with you; were I to speak and tell of your deeds, they would be too many to declare.