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Propolis Success? – Case Closed!

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

The proof is in the pudding

So they say

Take a look at these results

When nothing else could,

Propolis saved the day!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

Surgical incision open for 2 months

Surgical incision open for 2 months

We continue to be amazed at the amazing effects of propolis!  An old friend of the Dotsons and recent BEEpothecary customer has had phenomenal help getting his two month old wound to close up, using propolis salve.  We want to share this success with you.

Several months ago, Thom, from Michigan, had surgery on his elbow.  After the surgery, the incision just would not heal and the doctors could not find anything that worked to close this wound.  When we heard of his plight, the surgical incision had been open for two months and he had missed two months of work because of this.
We sent him some propolis salve right away.  Thom started using it as soon as he received it and took pictures to document the wound’s progress.

Within five days, his wound had closed significantly, as seen in the next photo.

thomwoundday5

Wound healing progress after 5 days of treatment with propolis salve

Needless to say, he and we, were thrilled with this progress!  Thom continued to use the propolis salve and recently sent us a picture of his wound after a month of treatment.  This is what his wound looks like now!

Complete healing after one month of Propolis Wound Salve treatment

Complete healing after one month of propolis salve treatment

 

Imagine what propolis can do for other kinds of skin ailments!  Acne, psoriasis, rosacea, shingles, eczema, bug bites, burns, rashes, etc.  There is clinical research to confirm the success of propolis treatment on these types of skin conditions.  You can find references to these studies in previous posts on this blog, or look up the research yourself at the National Institute of Health website, http://www.nlm.nih.gov or

Green Medicine’s Website at http://www.greenmedinfo.com.

Research is great, but personal experience is even better, as far as we are concerned!  Nothing thrills us more than our personal success  or the success of friends and customers, using the amazing BEE propolis!  Does propolis really work  – absolutely  YES! – CASED CLOSED!

For Propolis Products

BEE- Powered Health!

 

Psalm 147

Praise the Lord.How good it is to sing praises to our God, how pleasant and fitting to praise him!

The Lord builds up Jerusalem; he gathers the exiles of Israel.

He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds.

He determines the number of the stars and calls them each by name.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power; his understanding has no limit.

 

 

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Chicory and Arugula Salad with Honey Vinaigrette Recipe

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson
salad

The day has come for me to change my eating habits.  I’ve been trying to lose a few extra cheeky pounds.  Really, I’m ok with my weight and how I look, but when last years summer shorts are far to tight around my mid-section. It’s time to change something to drop a few inches off my girly waistline.

Yesterday, My husband took me to lunch at our friends new cafe’ .  It’s called The WELL!  They create amazing vegan salads, soup, glutenfree breads and treats along with their very own roasted coffee.   Lunch was delicious!  Should I try this???

So today,  I’ve decided to try my hand at veganizm.  Really, I need to go gluten-free!  I bet I would feel better but that means no more bread!!!!

 Oh Lord, you need to help this girl!  She can only do this, if  YOU help her!

OK!  I’m starting with salads that are tasted!

 I hate bland foods!  Did you hear me!  I hate bland diet foods!

This is going to be an interesting journey!  I hope I can get your support and ideas!

 

Chicory and Arugula Salad with Honey Vinaigrette Recipe

Some people like the bitterness of chicory and arugula, but in too large a quantity, the greens can be overwhelming. This straightforward salad tosses the bitter lettuces in a slightly sweet honey vinaigrette to balance things out. Add the crunch of toasted walnuts, and you’ve got a satisfying starter any day of the week.

This recipe was featured as part of  CHOW Easy Weeknight Dinner menu.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 medium head Belgian endive, coarsely chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1/2 small head radicchio, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 ounces baby arugula (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Combine the greens in a serving bowl and set aside.
  2. Whisk together the vinegar, honey, and measured salt and pepper in a small, nonreactive bowl. While constantly whisking, add the oil by pouring it in a thin stream down the side of the bowl. Whisk until all the oil is incorporated. Taste and adjust the seasoning as desired.
  3. Pour the vinaigrette over the reserved greens and, using your hands, mix to coat the salad. Taste and adjust the seasoning as desired. Top with the walnuts and serve.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

2 Corinthians 1:11 …as you help us by your prayers. Then many will give thanks on our behalf for the gracious favor granted us in answer to the prayers of many.

Swiss Chard with Honey-Roasted Garlic

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, Everyone!

Irish Blessing 

My Favorite Color is Green,  My Father and my husbands father, have ancestors from Ireland and Scotland.  We love to eat corn beef, sauerkraut and hash. We welcome a  good dark porter beer or a Guinness stout at our table.  As a child, I always wanted to see the end of a rainbow.  A few extra gold coins would have been a nice surprise for my folks.  Today, I’m happy right where I am.  I have an Unfailing Faith, good friends and family around, a wonderful husband to share life with and some good ole’ hard work, everyday!

Here are a few Irish proverbs

1. May the luck of the Irish be with you!

2. If you want praise, die. If you want blame, marry.

3. Here’s to a long life and a merry one. A quick death and an easy one. A pretty girl and an honest one. A cold pint and another one!

4. If you’re enough lucky to be Irish… You’re lucky enough!

5. May you have the hindsight to know where you’ve been, the foresight to know where you are going, and the insight to know when you have gone too far.

6. A man may live after losing his life but not after losing his honour.

7. “All the world’s a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.” – Sean O’Casey

8. You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your father was.

9. It is often that a person’s mouth broke his nose.

10. It is better to spend money like there’s no tomorrow than to spend tonight like there’s no money!

Tonight, I needed to come up with a dish that is green:)   So, I searched my pantry, ‘frigerator, chicken coop and garage..that’s where I store, last seasons garlic. I came up with an old favorite with a little twist of sweetness.

We are having a “not so” traditional St. Paddy’s day dinner. Instead we would like to celebrate with an American Irish Breakfast:  Eggs, corn-beef hash, fried bacon, sour dough bread,  coffee with St Brendan’s irish cream.

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

Swiss Chard with Honey-Roasted Garlic

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 1.48.49 PM

INGREDIENTS

2 heads garlic
2 teaspoons HONEY
1 teaspoon plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons salted butter
2 tablespoons pine nuts
2 bunches (almost 2 pounds) Swiss chard, stripped of stems and cut into 1-inch pieces (10 cups)
Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    Cut the top 1/2 inch off each head of garlic, exposing the cloves. Set the garlic in the center of a square of heavy aluminum foil. Pour 1 teaspoon of the honey and 1 teaspoon of the olive oil over the garlic, replace the tops, and fold up the sides of the foil to make a package, crimping the top tight. Bake until very tender and golden, 40 to 45 minutes.

    Transfer the baked garlic to a bowl, including all the juices in the foil pouch. When cool enough to handle, remove the garlic heads and carefully pop out the garlic cloves by pushing up from the bottom; try to keep the cloves intact. Add the remaining teaspoon honey and tablespoon olive oil and gently stir to combine.Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 5.07.24 PM

  2. Heat a very wide skillet over medium heat, and add the butter and pine nuts. When they begin to sizzle and turn golden brown, add half of the Swiss chard. Cook, stirring, until the greens wilt, a minute or two. Add the remaining chard. Once all of the chard is wilted, season with salt and pepper, and cook until most of the liquid has simmered off, another 2 to 3 minutes.

    Add the honey-roasted garlic to the chard, mix very gently to combine, and serve.  you can also add chopped almond and cranberries to add a little crunch.  either way, you will have them coming back for more.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

John 1:16    For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.

 

We have a new name ~ BEEpothecary

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

What exciting times we are experiencing, these days!

We have officially changed our name to BEEpothecary

BEEpothecary logo w-tagline

from Hive & Honey BEEpothecary.

beepthecary logo

We found that people started to call us Hive and Honey.  There’s nothing wrong with that. Until you start searching the interweb for our company.  You will find other beekeepers around the U.S of A using hive and honey. We have one in our backyard… You will find a shoe company, lingerie store, boutiques, clothing brands, photography, jewelry and on and on carrying the Hive and Honey name.

We felt we needed to stand out more. We are a unique company that makes the most of Propolis in all of our Skin, Hair and Health Products.

honey bee coming atcha 2

What is Propolis, you ask?

Bees make propolis, which they use to glue the materials of their hives together, by mixing beeswax and other secretions with resins from the buds of conifer and poplar trees. Those resins have natural germicidal properties. For centuries, people have used propolis on wounds and as a remedy for ailments ranging from acne to cancer, osteoporosis, itching, and tuberculosis. Today, propolis is used in the manufacture of chewing gum, cosmetics, creams, lozenges and ointments and is being investigated as a dental sealant and tooth enamel hardener. A number of studies have tested its effectiveness in humans and animals as a treatment for burns, minor wounds, infections, inflammatory diseases, dental pain, and herpes. While promising, the results of these studies are preliminary.  However, propolis does have proven antibiotic and antiseptic properties and may also have antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects. I consider it safe and useful as a home remedy.

So… with a swipe of our wrists and the removing of just “Hive and Honey.”  This small deletion, will give us exactly, what were looking for.

A Name the Stands out all by itself.

Where did we come up with the name, you ask?

A year ago, we had a name and logo ready to be published.  It was Honey Bee Apothecary. A Great name! It says everything we wanted it to emphasize.  BEE’s, Honey and Hive Products with medicinal properties.  But, as we were attending a Beekeeper’s conference in Michigan.  My brother-in-law a licensed pharmacist, Raymond Rutkowski, threw us a curveball. He told us that in Michigan, only Pharmacist and/or Pharmacies can carry the “Apothecary” name.   We were to double check our research in the State of Ohio.  Low and behold, he was right and we were again searching for a new name for our company.  On the way home, to Ohio, after a great conference and short family reunion with my twin sister Deborah.  We stopped off at a watering hole to get some comfort food. We decided that a full stomach and blackberry cobbler would help us achieve the maximum level of creativity. AND Shazam!  A powerful force came upon my husband and he uttered these famous words “Let’s switch out the “A” for “B” and add “pothecary”. Making sure that we use two capital EE’s to showcase the BEE. Because the BEE’s make the medicine and they should get all the credit.”

After, almost, a year in business. We have found that we need to simplify our name. So today, We would like to introduce to you, our new name

BEEpothecary Logo headliner

and show case all of our value added hive products. With that being said I have a ton of work to do. Creating new labels for every product we have, changing out the old logo to the new, marketing our new names in social media and local businesses.  So, Keep you eyes out for us.  We are at Celebrate Local at Easton Towncenter, City folks Farm Store in Clintonville, The Well, down in Lancaster (opening soon). We have a couple of hopeful business in Canal Winchester. When the weather get nicer, we will be at Pearl Alley in downtown Columbus, friday mornings,  Moonlight Market on Gay Street- once a month, and multiple other venus that we will promote as we lock in our calendar.

Check out out Marketplace:  http://mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

Like us on Facebook!  Stop by and and pick up products that you need.

In honor of our Name Change.

I thought I would make Blackberry Jam

It’s very complicated. Stick with me and you will be amazed at your Jam making skills!!

Homemade BEErry Jam

INGREDIENTS

Chia Jam ingred 1

  • 1 Tablespoon Chia Seeds
  • 1 Cup Blackberries or mixed berries of your choice
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Gather all the ingredients, listed above. Then, put them into little glass bowls and place on a pretty cutting board. (You don’t have to do this. It just pretty to lay everything out – I feel like a professional TV chef when I do it.) If you do do it.  You midas well (might as well) take some pictures and post them to the interweb for ohhs and ahhs Wink!!Chia Jam ingred 2

  2. Now the hard part: Blend all ingredients in a blender, mixer, or a handblender, like the one I used.  Blend until well mixed and berries are pulverized. Chia Jam ingred combined

  3. Pour into Jam Jars and ‘frigerate over night. Chia Jam ingred compleste2

  4. Dish on to toast, yogurt, with ice cream,  or on crackers and cream cheese, if desired.

  5. Finally, you must smile while you enjoy your hard work!Chia Jam ingred complested

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Laurie

Genesis 9:3 ESV 
Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you. And as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything.
 

Winter Renewing – Working with the Creator’s Gifts

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New batch of propolis tincture "brewing"

New batch of propolis tincture “brewing”

Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Holidays are over and  a new year’s coming on

Enough of rest and relaxation.  Jump in again, strong.

Re-branding and revising, making products new.

Get out that new propolis! Let’s start our new brew!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

With hustle and bustle of the holidays behind us, the Saums and Dotsons are anxious to use these next few cold months of winter to reflect on and refocus our efforts to bring amazing bee products to the public.  We have decided we want to re-brand our company to focus more on the bees and the “BEE POWER” they can provide to our  health.  We also want to re-formulate some of our products to improve them,  evaluate  the demand for individual products, review customer feedback and decide on products to add, change or drop.  We also  will be  looking for new stores to carry our product and new venues to attend in the spring, summer and fall.

But most importantly, because of our success of the last few months, we desperately need to mix up some new batches of our proprietary

treasured box of golden propolis

treasured box of golden propolis

ingredients, so we can make products to replenish our supply!  We spent a night in December, processing our dried, home-grown herbs used in our soothing and healing oils.  We sat on tarps in the Dotson’s living room and  rubbed bags full of herbs through screens to crush into little pieces and then put each kind into big mason jars.   And now that we have lots of golden, healing propolis, we can get down to business, mixing up our brews.

Cooking propolis in oil on an induction burner

Cooking propolis in oil on an induction burner

Laurie and Jeannie got together on New Year’s Eve day to start  brewing.  (Jeannie had already started 3 big jars of propolis in vodka last week, which must be soaked and shaken every day for at least 2 weeks, to make our propolis tincture.)  We started the day infusing propolis in olive oil using our induction cooking burner, which keeps the oil at a constant temperature.  We mix propolis and oil in a ratio, by weight and heat to 120 degrees farenheit for 20 minutes.  Then we pour through organza to strain.  Now we have 2 big jars of wonderful propolis oil.

Freshly made propolis olive oil

Freshly made propolis olive oil

Next, we started our herbal oil infusions, by measuring our dried herbs by weight and pouring (measured) olive oil over them in the mason jars, to cover.  We set these herb-oil mixtures on a shelf and will shake them every day.  We’ll let them sit for a month or two and add more plant material as it becomes available, if we decide it is needed.  Then we will mix these herbal oils together to make our special soothing and healing oils to use in our skin care products.

Starting our herb infused oils

Starting our herb infused oils

A big batch of lemon balm in olive oil

A big batch of lemon balm in olive oil

Rosemary in olive oil

Rosemary in olive oil

Making herb infused oils

Making herb infused oils

~  ~  ~

It’s fun and rather awe-inspiring to work with the Creator’s gifts!

Deuteronomy 33

13 About Joseph he said: “May the Lord bless his land  with the precious dew from heaven above  and with the deep waters that lie below;

14 with the best the sun brings forth  and the finest the moon can yield;

15 with the choicest gifts of the ancient mountains  and the fruitfulness of the everlasting hills;

16 with the best gifts of the earth and its fullness  and the favor of him who dwelt in the burning bush. Let all these rest on the head of Joseph,  on the brow of the prince among his brothers.

Propolis and Cancer

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

God designed bees to make perfect hexagon cells,

Delicious honey and beeswax to spare.

But most amazing of all, the red-gold propolis goo

Healing from the hive for me and you!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

People are talking about propolis and cancer on the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Survivor Network!  Cancer patients are using propolis and posting information about propolis and cancer fighting properties.  I decided to do some research to verify what is being said.

Propolis is a natural compound made by honeybees to coat the inside of their hives.  It is collected by the bees from plant buds and bark to disinfect and protect their beehive from disease, bacteria, viruses, and fungus. Its composition is approximately 55% resins and balms, 30% wax, 10% etheric oils, and 5% pollen. It contains over 180 compounds, many of which are biologically active. It contains almost all minerals, vitamins and amino acids needed by the body. Its great content of flavonoids, amongst others, is what makes it antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial, anti-allergenic, antibiotic, and anesthetic.  It can be ground into powder and consumed with honey, or it can also be chewed with gum. It may be dissolved in alcohol or in natural glycerin to make a tincture.

Some of propolis’ ingredients have shown antioxidant and anti-tumor properties in early laboratory and animal studies,

  • A study published in 2008 by Biosci Biotechnol Biochem shows that propolis suppresses tumor angiogenesis by inducing apoptosis in tube-forming endothelial cells.  This means that propolis suppresses the growth of blood vessels by the cancer cells and causes cell death.  This study can be found at:

Examine Guide, GreenMedInfo Recommendedhttp://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/propolis-suppresses-angiogenesis

  • Another study published in 2008 showed Anticarcinogenic and antimitotic effects  of propolis on tissue cultures of bladder cancer.  This means it decreased the cell division of the cancer cells.  This study is found at:

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/propolis-has-anticarcinogenic-and-antimitotic-effect-tissue-cultures-bladder-cancer-0

  • A study from 2009 showed growth inhibitory activity of an alcohol tincture of propolis in four human colon carcinoma cell lines.  It states that propolis may provide a novel approach to the chemoprevention and treatment of human colon carcinoma.  This study can be found at:

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/propolis-inhibits-growth-human-colon-cancer-cell-lines

Studies cited on http://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/herb/propolis, state that:

  • One of the flavonoids extracted from propolis showed a more potent cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells than did the anticancer drug 5-fluoruracil .  It also cited a study that showed propolis was found to inhibit proliferation and induced cell death in human leukemia (HL-60) cells.

Researchers from the University of Chicago Medical Center, intrigued by propolis’ anti-cancer potential, decided to look at one of its bioactive components, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), and its impact on human prostate cancer cells.

  • In cells grown in a lab, even small doses of CAPE slowed the growth of tumor cells. And when low oral doses were given to mice with prostate tumors, tumor growth slowed by 50 percent! What’s more, feeding CAPE to mice daily caused the tumors to stop growing, although they returned when the CAPE was removed from their diets.
  • This suggests the propolis compound works by impacting signaling networks that control cancerous cell growth, rather than by killing the cells directly. However, there are at least four studies on propolis’ apoptotic properties, indicating that technically it is capable of directly killing cancer cells, including prostate cancer, melanoma and more, as well. You can read more about this at:

http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2012/20120504-beehive.html

Writing in Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, researchers expanded on some of propolis’ potential effects:

  • “Propolis, a waxy substance produced by the honeybee, has been adopted as a form of folk medicine since ancient times. It has a wide spectrum of alleged applications including potential anti-infection and anticancer effects. Many of the therapeutic effects can be attributed to its immunomodulatory functions. The composition of propolis can vary according to the geographic locations from where the bees obtained the ingredients.
  • Two main immunopotent chemicals have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and artepillin C. Propolis, CAPE, and artepillin C have been shown to exert summative immunosuppressive function on T lymphocyte subsets but paradoxically activate macrophage function.
  • On the other hand, they also have potential antitumor properties by different postulated mechanisms such as suppressing cancer cells proliferation via its anti-inflammatory effects; decreasing the cancer stem cell populations; blocking specific oncogene signaling pathways; exerting antiangiogenic effects; and modulating the tumor microenvironment.
  • The good bioavailability by the oral route and good historical safety profile makes propolis an ideal adjuvant agent for future immunomodulatory or anticancer regimens.”

More on this at:http://www.naturalnews.com/040533_propolis_cancer_prevention_immune_function.html

  • A study from 2010 tested propolis for its effect on malignant colon cancer cells and normal cells. The extract of propolis compounds were found to be the most active against HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells, without affecting normal human cells, arresting the cancer cells at the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle.  This article can be found at:
1 If you fully obey the Lord your God and carefully follow all his commands I give you today, the Lord your God will set you high above all the nations on earth.
All these blessings will come on you and accompany you if you obey the Lord your God:
You will be blessed in the city and blessed in the country.

The fruit of your womb will be blessed, and the crops of your land and the young of your livestock—the calves of your herds and the lambs of your flocks.

Your basket and your kneading trough will be blessed.

You will be blessed when you come in and blessed when you go out.