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Three Ways to eat with Propolis and BeeBread

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

Today is the first, real day where the weather felt like Fall.  I’m looking out my dining room window. Watching the limbs of my crabapple trees dip low to the ground, because they are loaded with heavy bright red, cherry size apples. Crabapple butter soon!   My favorite morning spread on buttered toast. yummy!  I’ll post that one, soon!

Ohio in September

 It’s been so busy today that I forgot to eat.  This really has gotten me to think about having healthy snack, ready to eat at a moments notice. And I’m not talking apples and carrot, which I do have, but something fun for my mouth.  Which made me think of  a conversation I had earlier in the day with a customer.  She has young, school age children who are feeling better, since they have been taking our Propolis oil.  But the girls are not crazy about the taste of Olive oil and Propolis. I don’t blame them. It’s not a taste that I crave either:) But like them, I do take it every day!  So I suggested she add the Propolis oil in a salad and if she bought some beebread she could add that t0 the girls morning oatmeal or in a yummy smoothie. Propolis tincture can be added to any fruit drinks. Added it to anything if you don’t want to take it straight down your throat.  She laughed and asked for some recipes.

First off…

If you don’t know what Propolis is, it’s a resin that the Honeybee gather from tops of trees bud and the bark. They mix it with their enzymes and then they plaster the whole inside of the hive.propolis in the hive

 It helps insulate the hive, it helps clean the hive and it protects the hive from bacteria and viruses.  This same Propolis that helps fight sickness in the hive, will also protect us from the the same viruses and bacteria floating and hanging about us.  Propolis icontains flavonoids that are anti viral, anti bacterial, anti microbial, anti fungal and an anti-inflammatory Propolis can be a great dietary supplement to enhance your overall health and boost immunity.

BeeBread is Pollen and Honey mixed together. BeeBread is filled with everything you need to energize your day, workout or recovery.  It is loaded with  vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein and iron that will benefit people of all ages and boost the immune system.

Flying about from flower to flower, bees collect pollen in the pollen baskets on their legs and carry it back to the hive. In the hive, pollen is used as a protein source necessary during brood-rearing. The pollen pellets and honey are combined and ferment until the the hard shell of the pollen is dissolve. At that time the bee will feast on it and feed it to their grwoing young.

So back to my phone conversation and my hungry stomach.  How can you get Propolis and BeeBread

into you daily route?  Here are a three recipes!

 Stay Healthy with the Power of BEES 

Basil Vinaigrette Dressing

Original recipe makes 1 -1/2 cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/2- 1 tsp of BEEpothecary Propolis Oil
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup BEEpothecary wildflower honey
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basiL
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

PREPARATION

  1. In a bowl, whisk together the olive oil, apple cider vinegar, honey, basil, and garlic. Pour over or toss with your favorite salad to serve

Pineapple Coconut Bitescoconut bites

INGREDIENTS

Makes: About 20 cookies

Active Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

INGREDIENTS

FILLING

  • 1 1/4 cups canned crushed pineapple, slightly drained
  • 1 tablespoon BEEpothecary honey
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

DOUGH

  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 6 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup unsalted cold butter
  • 3 tablespoons Propolis Coconut oil or Propolis Olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

PREPARATION

  1. To prepare filling: Spoon pineapple into a small saucepan with honey and cornstarch. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until thickened, about 3 minutes. Let cool.
  2. To prepare dough: Meanwhile, process almonds in a food processor until finely ground. Add confectioners’ sugar; process to combine. Add whole-wheat pastry flour and all-purpose flour; process to combine. Drop butter by the tablespoon through the feed tube, processing briefly after each addition. Add oil and pulse once or twice. Add coconut, cornstarch, salt and vanilla and process just until the mixture resembles crumbly, fine meal, but will hold together if pressed.
  3. Reserve a scant 1/2 cup of tart dough to use as crumbled topping.
  4. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line mini muffin pans with 20 paper cups.
  5. Drop a scant tablespoon of dough into each paper cup. Press the dough into the bottom and up the sides of the cup, making a well in the center, to form a miniature crust. Spoon 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons of the pineapple filling into each crust and top each with some of the reserved crumbs.
  6. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the crust is cooked through (watch carefully toward the end and move the pan to the bottom rack if the top begins to brown before the bottom crust is done), 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool in the pans.

 

 

No-Bake BeeBread Granola Bars beebread no bakes

INGREDIENTS

PREP TIME: 10 mins
COOK TIME: 5 mins
TOTAL TIME: 15 mins
Serves: 10 bars
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup packed dates, pitted  (dried plums or figs)
  • 3 Tbsp Flax seed
  • 1/4 cup BEEpothecary BeeBread 
  • 1/4 cup creamy salted natural peanut butter or almond butter
  • 1 cup roasted unsalted almonds, loosely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats (gluten free for GF eaters)
  • optional additions: chocolate chips, dried fruit, nuts, banana chips, vanilla, etc.
PREPARATIONbeebread no bake 2
  1. Process dates in a food processor until small bits remain (about 1 minute). It should form a “dough” like consistency. (mine rolled into a ball)
  2. Optional step: Toast your oats and flaxseed in a 350 degree oven for 15-ish minutes or until slightly golden brown. Otherwise, leave them raw – I toasted them
  3. Place oats, flax seed, almonds and dates in a bowl – set aside.
  4. Warm honey and peanut butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Stir and pour over oat mixture and then mix, breaking up the dates to disperse throughout.
  5. Once thoroughly mixed, transfer to an 8×8 dish or other small pan lined with plastic wrap or parchment paper so they lift out easily. (A loaf pan might work, but will yield thicker bars.)
  6. Press down until uniformly flattened. Cover with parchment or plastic wrap, and let set in fridge or freezer for 15-20 minutes to harden.
  7. Remove bars from pan and chop into 10 even bars. Store in an airtight container for up to a few days. I kept mine in the freezer to keep them extra fresh, but it isn’t necessary.
NOTES
*If your dates don’t feel sticky and moist, soak them in water for 10 minutes then drain before processing. This will ultimately help hold the bars together better.

Looking forward to seeing you soon, Laurie –

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and Twitter @BEEpothecary

Matthew 4:4

Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Vote for Us – Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Your Vote is Needed!

Wells Fargo Works for Small Business

We posted our application to the Wells Fargo Small Business Contest. Please go to this website every day and vote for BEEpothecary. You can vote multiple time, just on different devices or log into WF multiple times. This will give us a chance to win $25,000 and mentoring for our business! Go and vote now!

Follow the Link to our Vote Page

Follow the Link Below to our Vote Page

 

https://wellsfargoworks.com/project?x=us-en_viewentriesandvote_1070

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie, Pete, Jeannie and Steve –

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1 Chronicles 4:10    Jabez cried out to the God of Israel, “Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.” And God granted his request.

Rhubarb Chutney

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

All I want to do is get my garden growing!  It’s all I have on my mind, these days.  Do I have all my seeds? Where are the shipments? Did I remember to buy non-GMO seeds? When can I get farmer Bud to till up the garden? Why am I so late, in thinking about all of these?  Potato SEEDS???? ugh!:(

 Yesterday, I was wandering around the yard, watching the clover grow and contemplating the future of my back yard. When I happened upon my wonderful rhubarb plant.

rhubarbplant

How lovely you are little, big plant!  I didn’t think of you and yet here you are. What a blessing:)

HEW_rhubarb_s4x3_lg

A good friend, a couple years ago, gave me a bit of hers. Now I have, this honkin’ mass of beautiful rhubarb.  Each stalk is at less, an inch in thickness and two feet long.  I pulled out the biggest and longest stalk and then took a bite off the end!  WoooDoggy was it tart!  I felt like a kid all over.

Growing up in Michigan, My mother always had a plant or two her garden or along a fence line. My sister’s and I would each get a cup of white sugar and a short rhubarb stalk and go to town on it.  Dipping the stack in the sugar and then gnawing on the sweet fibers to mix the two flavors.  Yummy!

A few days ago my daughter had a birthday. She loves rhubarb. So, I thought for her big Birthday Bash, I would make something with Rhubarb!  I came across multiple recipes and with a little experimenting, I made this for Hanna!

Happy Birthday HANNA!

Don’t for get to Check out our Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

Rhubarb Chutney

rhub chut

rhubarb-chutney-sq

Rhubarb Chutney

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
4 tablespoons Honey
1/4 cup water
1 pound rhubarb stalks, sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

Directions:
Heat oil in a medium saute pan. Add the shallots, allspice, salt and pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until just softened. Add the ginger and cook 1 minute more.  Add the rhubarb, honey and water to the pan. Cook until the rhubarb is just tender — you don’t want it to fall apart.  Remove fruit heat and stir in red wine vinegar.

Serve atop chicken, pork or salmon, alongside bread or biscuits or paired with sharp white cheddar, Manchego or blue cheese.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

God has blessed us this week. I pray he will bless you with grace.

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12 NIV

PS I’m not a great blogger, but I do love passing on this love of all things delicious!  If my grammar, spelling and punctuation is not correct please forgive me. I pray you can see pass that and see you heart.

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

 

Sweet Honey Lavender and Coconut Treats

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

IT’S Spring!  I love this time of year. It starts in February sometime…You know the weather! You open up the door, to what you think is going to be fridged, cold winter air, but you are surprised with a warm 50 degrees that you feel crosses your face. You begin to smell and hear the first signs of spring peeking into your backyard.

My dream Lavender garden:)

My dream Lavender garden:)

Let me repeat that in different words, the on and off of warm days, along with that sweet smell of purple flowers growing in your garden plots.  aahhh!  Such Sweetness!  lol

 So, I feel Spring is here, even though, the weather man says we  are getting a nor-eastern tonight.

Bring it on! One last hoorah, winter. ONE LAST HOORAH! I mean it!!!!

Spring brings herbs, plants and Lavender!!!  I am a fein for lavender! I love the smell, the look, and the feel that this little flower produces.  I’m getting ready for spring planting and I need little inspiration!  So here is a yummy sweet treat thats a bit on the unordinary but a lotta-bit on the delicious!

Don’t for get to Check out our Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

Sweet Honey Lavender and Coconut Treats

honey lavender and coconut balls

INGREDIENTS

7 oz Package of Unsweetened Coconut Flakes

2 TBSP HONEY

1 cup Dried Plums or Figs – I used plums, because thats what I had in the cupboard.

1/4 cup Flax seeds

2 TBSP Chia seeds

1 TBSP Lavender buds

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Using a food processor,  blend the coconut into a powder, then add lavender and blend some more.  Then add figs or plums until well blended. Finally add the honey, flax seed and chia seed.  Finish by pulsing until well blended.  Ball up with a 1 Tbsp cookie scoop. place on platter and serve or scoop and place in sealed container and ‘frigerate.

I eat three of these with a glass of water as a mid-day snack!  This recipe is a great way to get protein, fiber, and antioxidants.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings, Laurie –

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary

John 1:16    For from His fullness we have all received, grace upon grace.

 

Bee Powered Beautiful Skin

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Propolis to help our skin! Another great use, we find.

From eczema and psoriasis, Herpes 1 and 2,

To wounds and burns, Even wrinkles, too.

Pass this on, If you’d be so kind!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

Whether your skin is unblemished and beautiful and you just want to keep it that way – or you have a bothersome skin condition, PROPOLIS could be the answer for you!  We’ve studied the research, tried it ourselves and want others to reap the benefits from this amazing substance made by the honeybees!

In  our first years as beekeepers, we found that honey was becoming more widely known for its antimicrobial properties and its benefit for a healing dressing on wounds and burns.  It was also being used more readily in treatment of skin conditions like pityriasis, tinea, seborrhea, dandruff, diaper dermatitis, psoriasis, and  hemorrhoids.  In cosmetics  it was known for moisturizing, softening, soothing, and hair conditioning effects,  helping keep the skin young-looking and slowing wrinkle formation, regulating pH and preventing infections.  All this had been known for decades, but honey had not been used widely in the US until recently.

We were excited to learn about these benefits of the honey our bees make.   But, we have found that honey is hard to keep in-solution in all natural cosmetic products without adding a chemical emulsifier to keep it mixed with the oils (honey is water based).  It tends to separate out of balms and ointments, and we just didn’t want to add artificial chemicals to our products.

Fortunately, we quickly found a solution!  We discovered something just as effective, or maybe even better that the bee’s honey – PROPOLIS, the sticky tree resin-based goo the bees make to seal and sterilize their hive.  It can be used to help with many conditions and health ailments, both inside and out, in ourselves and our animals.  And we find it  easier to keep it mixed in our skin care products.  We’ve used it ourselves for three years, and are truly amazed at what it can do!

As we have noted many times in our blog, over 50 years of research has proven that propolis contains flavonoids and plant esters that have  antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. (see previous blogs about propolis for additional research we have reported on.)   One study from 2011  found that poplar bud extract significantly regulated genes involved in antioxidant defenses, inflammatory response and cell renewal, processes involved in skin aging. Poplar bud resin is the main component of bee propolis. The  antioxidant properties  suggest potential anti-aging properties in propolis which could be utilized in cosmetic and nutraceutical formulations. (Stéphanie Dudonné, Pascal Poupard, Philippe Coutière, Marion Woillez, Tristan Richard, Jean-Michel Mérillon, Xavier Vitrac)

Beyond just the daily use of propolis in normal skin care routine, research has shown that propolis can be effective in treating many bothersome skin conditions.  In a 2013 study, propolis was used as a topical treatment for psoriasis.  While testing was done on mice, the conclusion was that propolis extract could possibly  treat psoriatic lesions by reducing the inflammatory cells without any

toxic effect.  (Fitoterapia)

From livestrong.com, in a 2013 article by Carol Sarao,  it was reported that propolis is being used by naturopathic healers and herbalists to treat eczema.  Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin condition which causes inflammation and itching. Symptoms include red or grayish patches, thickened, scaly skin and small raised bumps which may ooze and then crust over.   Eczema is usually treated with steroids, antihistamines and antibiotics, which often have undesirable side effects.  Propolis treats the infection and inflammation without these bothersome side effects. Our daughter, Sarah, who has had eczema all her life, has found skin balm, with propolis, helps her eczema outbreaks.

A clinical study published in 1993, in an issue of the journal “Drugs Under Experimental and Clinical Research,”  propolis was reported to be a potent anti-inflammatory agent.  It suppressed production of histamines and prostaglandins in animal tissue. Drugs.com states that both oral and topical applications of propolis can improve wound healing.   The University of Maryland Medical Center says that propolis is rich in antioxidant flavonoids, which help enhance the immune system, and notes that it may heal lesions from the HSV-1 virus more effectively than Zovirax, an antiviral ointment.

Propolis has shown to be an effective antimicrobial agent against many microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus strains and Candida tropicalis, even those resistant to antibiotics!  (A Ugur, M Barlas, N Ceyhan, V Turkmen, 2000) This study can be found at greenmedinfo.com (see Blog Roll for link)  In a study on humans, propolis was found to be an effective treatment for cutaneous warts. In patients with plane and common warts treated

with Propolis, cure was achieved in 75% and 73% of patients, respectively.  (Hatem Zedan, Eman R M Hofny, Sahar A Ismail, 2009, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Andrology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.) Found at greenmedinfo.com

A study reported in 2009 showed that Propolis extracts might be suitable for topical application against herpes infection.  (Paul Schnitzler, Annett Neuner, Silke Nolkemper, Christine Zundel, Hans Nowack, Karl Heinz Sensch, Jürgen Reichling) greenmedinfo.com  Another study reported in 2009 showed its effectiveness against HSV-2, the genital herpes virus that causes recurring outbreaks. It stated that propolis extracts might be suitable for topical therapy in recurrent herpetic infection.  (Silke Nolkemper, Jürgen Reichling, Karl Heinz Sensch, Paul Schnitzler)

A study reported in 1988 reported that propolis was an effective treatment for Herpes Zoster, the virus that causes Shingles.  (Silke Nolkemper, Jürgen Reichling, Karl Heinz Sench, Paul Schnitzler)  In a more recent study, Propolis  Ointment was applied topically to the Shingles blisters  of study patients, 4 times a day.  Those in the propolis test group showed faster healing than the other medication tested, and the placebo group. (Vynograd et al., 2000).

Propolis continues to amaze us, as a nature-made, God-Inspired substance that borders on the miraculous.  Nowhere have we ever seen one substance that can do so many things.  For healthy skin and bothersome skin conditions, it can have positive and safe results!  We encourage you to see for yourself.

We include  propolis for these possible benefits, in all our skin care products.  We use skin benefitting oils and butters that soften and moisturize and infuse them with herbs known for beneficial skin effects.

For Propolis Products go to :     mkt.com/beepothecary

PROPOLIS FOR HEALTHY SKIN – POWERED BY BEES

Song of Songs 4

9 You have stolen my heart, my sister, my bride; you have stolen my heart with one glance of your eyes,   with one jewel of your necklace.
10 How delightful is your love, my sister, my bride!  How much more pleasing is your love than wine, and the fragrance of your perfume     more than any spice!
11 Your lips drop sweetness as the honeycomb, my bride;  milk and honey are under your tongue. The fragrance of your garments  is like the fragrance of Lebanon.
12 You are a garden locked up, my sister, my bride; you are a spring enclosed, a sealed fountain.
13 Your plants are an orchard of pomegranates  with choice fruits, with henna and nard,
14 nard and saffron,  calamus and cinnamon,   with every kind of incense tree,  with myrrh and aloes  and all the finest spices.
15 You are[b] a garden fountain,   a well of flowing water     streaming down from Lebanon.

Honey for Healing – Powered by Bees!

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Honey, natural, gold and pure,

Yes, we love its sweet allure.

But did you know, there’s more for you

Coming from this sticky goo?

Not only is it tasty to devour

It can also heal cuts, sores and wounds

With its power.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

 

Honey, one of the valuable gifts from the beehive, is being used for more than just a yummy sweetener in food.  With two nurses in the family, I had heard my daughters talk about using honey- treated dressings on wounds and bedsores in hospitals and nursing homes here in Ohio. As I cared for my mother in her last days,  I asked every nurse and wound care specialist, in Kansas, if they were using medicinal honey. They all confirmed that yes, they were! Though none of them knew about the even more amazing benefits of propolis from the beehive, I was encouraged to hear that the natural healer, honey, was now widely accepted in the medical field. I’d like to share some information with you, documented with reliable research, on the medicinal uses of honey. I have paraphrased this information to be a little more understandable to us laypeople!   The entire article, “Understanding how honey impacts on wounds: an update on recent research findings”, by Abdul Seckam and Rose, complete with references to the research and a bibliography, is available at: http://www.woundsinternational.com

Wounds International Logo

Understanding how honey impacts on wounds: an update on recent research findings

Honey has been used for centuries in wound care as a topical antimicrobial agent. Licensed wound care products containing medical-grade honey first became available in 1999 and are now widely used. Honey’s therapeutic properties come from its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Laboratory evidence published in the past 5 years is helping the medical community understand how honey works to heal wounds and is now being integrated into modern medical practice. A range of medical honey products are available from several manufacturers for use on traumatic wounds, surgical incision sites, burns, sloughy wounds, and pressure ulcers.

Some researchers have criticised that clinical evidence to support the use of honey in the treatment of superficial wounds and burns was of low quality. By contrast, a review of 19 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a total of 2554 participants suggested that honey improved healing times in mild to moderate superficial and partial thickness burns when compared to conventional dressings. Another recent review of 33 RCTs noted that participants using honey had increased from 1965 in 2006 to 3556 in 2011, with a broadening in the range of wound types included, the choice of dressings available to clinicians, and the types of honey employed. Clinicians suggest that the effectiveness of different types of honey dressings used on similar wounds, be studied to test and compare the healing effectiveness of each.

Therapeutic properties of honey

Research has shown that honey has the following qualities: antimicrobial activity, deodorizing action, debriding action and osmotic effect, anti-inflammatory activity, antioxidant activity, and enhanced rate of healing. Essentially, honey can be regarded as an antimicrobial agent with the ability to promote wound healing.
Chemically honey is a complex substance whose antimicrobial components have been well established but , all honeys are not equal. Methylglyoxal was shown to contribute to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey, frequently used medicinally. Many honeys generate hydrogen peroxide on dilution, but manuka honey does not produce detectable levels and, as such, has been called a non-peroxide honey.

Honey has a broad spectrum of activity against bacteria and fungi. Gram-positive bacteria are

often involved in wound infection. Staphylococcus aureus – the most common cause of wound infection – has been shown to be inhibited by relatively low concentrations of honey. Antibiotic resistant strains, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VSE and VRE) have shown to be inhibited by honey. A recent study showed that the growth of 15 cultures of Streptococcus species isolated from wounds were inhibited by honey.

Of Gram-negative bacteria commonly implicated in wound infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric bacteria, Stenotrophomonas species, and Acinetobacter baumannii, have been shown to be susceptible to honey in vitro. Honey works in several ways to inhibit bacteria including: interrupting cell division, causing cell walls to break down, and damaging the bacteria’s DNA.

Patients with infected or highly exuding wounds may experience wound malodor. Honey has been shown to have a deodorizing effect in patients with malodorous wounds, which is probably due to the inhibition of bacteria. This trait is most notable within 24 hours of the application of honey to the wounds

Antimicrobial resistance to honey

With the introduction of new antimicrobials into clinical practice, the emergence of resistant strains of bacteria normally follows at some point. But experiments in which bacteria were exposed to low concentrations of manuka honey failed to select for honey-resistant strains. While these findings do not prove that bacterial strains won’t become resistant to honey in the future, they do suggest that the possibility is slight.

Debriding action of honey and osmotic effect

The role of honey in wound debridement ( the removal of dead tissue) has been described in research. Manuka honey was demonstrated to promote improved debridement, compared to a hydrogel.  Manuka honey reduces the PH in the wound, preventing the formation of nonviable tissue.
The osmotic effect (ability to attract and hold water) of honey has been thought to encourage lymphatic flow to devitalized tissue, while reducing bacterial load This promotes debridement by allowing substances to form in the wound that lower the quantity of nonviable tissue .

Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of honey

Wounds that do not progress through the usual phases of healing persist in a chronic inflammatory state caused by damaging chemicals and reactions in the wound. One way to interrupt this chronic inflammatory cycle is to remove free radicals with antioxidants and honey is known to contain antioxidants that scavenge free radicals. Although the anti-inflammatory effects of antioxidants in honey have been demonstrated in animal models, clinical studies are scarce, but it may be that these effects explain the benefits seen in treating burns with honey.

The future

The use of honey in modern wound care is still met with some skepticism. Since the advent of evidence-based medicine, changing clinical practice depends on providing clinicians with appropriate levels of evidence of clinical efficacy. Although honey has become a first-line intervention in some wound care clinics, larger and better designed studies are needed to cement the role of honey in modern wound care.

I have witnessed the healing effects of honey and propolis on wounds and sores. Honey and/or propolis have replaced triple antibiotic, burn ointment and other wound treatments in our family medicine cabinet, and they can in yours, too! Hopefully, research will continue to be done in this country, so Americans can further benefit from these natural treasures! Meanwhile, jump in and try out the healing resources – powered by bees!

Honey

 

 

 

 

 

Isaiah 45

3I will give you hidden treasures,   riches stored in secret places, so that you may know that I am the Lord,  the God of Israel, who summons you by name.
For the sake of Jacob my servant, of Israel my chosen, I summon you by name  and bestow on you a title of honor, though you do not acknowledge me.

I am the Lord, and there is no other;  apart from me there is no God.  I will strengthen you,  though you have not acknowledged me,
so that from the rising of the sun to the place of its setting people may know there is none besides me.    I am the Lord, and there is no other.