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Fall in the BEE Yard

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

 

Cooler nights and shorter days, 

Bring out jeans and sweaters

And change our ways.

The honey bees,

Make changes too.

Bringing in nectar,

Making lots of goo!

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Fall is officially here and the nights are getting cooler but the daytime temperatures are unpredictable! The temperature can range from high 80’s to somewhere in the 50’s. We never know what to expect! But the bees’ activities this time of year, are always the same. It is time for them to get ready for the coming winter. In the fall, the bees work hard to get a last load of flower nectar into their hive, to make their honey-food for winter. The nectar comes mainly from goldenrod and asters this time of year, giving the fall honey a darker color and bolder taste, For some of us, it is the favorite of all!

20150531_144157If there is an abundance of nectar flowing and not too much rain, the bees will be able to fill up lots of frames of nectar, which they will fan with their tiny wings, to evaporate it down to sweet, dark, flavorful honey. And if they make more than what they need for winter (typically about 100 pounds), they we get to pull some honey frames off for us!! We can’t wait! The bees also collect lots of resin from the trees and use it to make extra propolis in the fall. They will use this sticky goo to seal the hive for winter, filling all the cracks and crevices with globs of propolis and covering all the surfaces with a thin layer. Propolis also kills bacteria, viruses and molds that might be present in the hive, keeping it sanitary and healthy as they hsteve-at-toyead into winter.

We made a trip out to our bee yards this week, to check on our bees and see if there was any fall honey for us.  We found some hives thriving and some sort of struggling along.  We took notes and made plans to check again in a few weeks whenjeannie-scraping the goldenrod and aster nectar flow is over.  Then, we might need to feed some of the smaller hives, to help them build up their stores for winter.  We noted some smaller hives  that may have difficulty making it through the winter.  We are thinking about trying the 2 queen method where you  place a weaker hive atop a stronger hive with 2 queen excluders and a box of honey between them.  Combining them this way allows the worker bees  from both hives to pass through the excluders to get around both hives to move take care of larvae, move honey stores around and help take care of both queens.  We will get out into our apiaries at the beginning of November to decide this, and to prepare our hives for winter.

We also found about 5 boxes of honey we can pull in a few weeks, once it is capped. We are excited about having sweet dark fall honey!   The boxes we pull off are in addition to the honey we will leave for the bees. They will need between 80 and 100 pound to eat during th
e winter so they have energy to shiver their flight muscles, generating heat to keep the queen at 93 degrees all winter!

And our best discovery working in our bee yards was finding several hives that are making tons of propolis. On one hive it was dripping down the sides!   7-oz-propolis-one-hiveWe got 7 ounces  – mostly from one hive – that was in our way and had to be removed.  Most beekeepers would be cursing it and tossing
it over their shoulder into the grass after scraping it off.  But we celebrate because we know how precious it is as a natural health substance.  It’s like gold, to us.  Our gift from the bees.  We have read propolis-isnlidscores and scores of research on propolis and know it has shown to be antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant.  We will use our propolis to make dietary supplements, skin care, shaving products, soaps, and lip balms, all fortified with propolis, because we want everyone to know about propolis and be able to have access to it.

Powered by BEES!

 

TO ALL BEEKEEPERS:

What are you doing with your propolis?  Don’t throw it away!  

Since you have to clean your hives anyway, why not make some money doing it!

We buy propolis by the pound. Save it in baggies as you clean up your equipment.  

Store it in the freezer and call us when you have a pound or more.

We will email you the instructions on how to clean it and give you a price.

We also buy: Beeswax, Honey and Pollen!

Email us:BEEpothecary@gmail.com

1 Peter 1:6-8

In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials.

These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.

Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy,

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Propolis and Intestinal Flora

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

What are the things propolis can do

While protecting healthy processes, too?

Don’t want a cure if it’s worse than the ill.

Can propolis be better than taking a pill?

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Another question recently came to us after a propolis presentation at a Beekeepers Club Meeting.  The question was whether propolis was safe to take every day and specifically what effect it had on gut bacteria.  So, back to the research sites I go.

Propolis has a complex chemical composition.   Researchers  found between 104 and 149  different chemicals from samples of propolis collected from around the world. These compounds are grouped  in seven categories: aliphatic acids, aromatic acids, esters, di- and triterpenes, flavonoids, sugars and miscellaneous.  It is not surprising that propolis has anti-microbial properties.

The question is,  if it can inhibit the growth of gastric pathogens like H. pylori, what effect would it have on the normal intestinal microflora or probiotics taken for therapeutic reasons.  The aim of one research project was to grow two typical intestinal/probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium infantis, in milk .  Different concentrations of propolis were added to the milk to test whether propolis would affect their growth and/or metabolism.

The bacteria in milk in the presence of propolis may not reflect their reaction in the intestine, but at least the tests might indicate if medicines containing propolis could effect the intestinal flora or  probiotics.

Six concentrations of propolis were used – 0, 100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 mg/100 ml of milk. (A scant tsp. of 10% propolis tincture provides 333 mg of propolis).  The impact of propolis on both bacteria was concentration dependent. The propolis extract had an adverse effect on the growth of Bif. infantis but was stimulatory to L. acidophilus. The strong antibacterial properties of propolis appear to have affected Bif. infantis more than L. acidophilus. at even at 100 mg of propolis.

Although propolis had an adverse effect on the growth of the bifidobacteria, it did have a desirable influence on the release of beneficial fatty acids. In humans, these fatty acids play an essential role in maintaining the healthy status of the GI tract. A low concentration of propolis (1.0 mg/ml) stimulated a dramatic secretion of these acids.  Thus, patients using propolis might, (despite a possible decline in bifidobacteria), be getting considerable benefit from this increase of fatty acids.

It is not known if propolis ingested, reaches the lower GI tract but it is feasible, if 2-3 g is taken for periods longer than 2 weeks. If one took propolis for  two weeks, then any fall in the population of bifidobacteria would probably pass unnoticed by the patient. But it would interesting to know whether loose stools or mild diarrhea accompanies long term usage of propolis extracts. One could remedy this by eating a yogurt containing a high count of  Bifidobacterium.

Propolis is highly regarded as a medicine with anti-bacterial properties and this study indicates that it could have a positive impact on the intestinal microflora.  The fact that there could be a further benefit for those taking propolis to cure a disease is an attractive prospect.  The full research article can be found at: Propolis stimulating to good gut bacteria.

Another study, done on rats, showed that propolis had a significant protective effect on ileal mucosa (lining of part of the small intestine) and reduced the leaking of bacteria through the intestinal wall to other organs.  This study can be found at:  Propolis – GI issues .

Four generations of our family take propolis – some daily, some three times a day when treating an illness – and not of us have experienced the worsening of gastrointestinal issues.  In some cases, gastro issues have improved.  Many believe propolis and other natural products are safer for our intestinal flora while treating harmful germs, than taking pharmaceuticals, that are known to destroy many good gut bacteria.

Health- Powered by bees!

Psalm 145

I will exalt you, my God the King; 

I will praise your name for ever and ever.

Every day I will praise you 

and extol your name for ever and ever.

Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise;
    his greatness no one can fathom.
One generation commends your works to another;
    they tell of your mighty acts.
They speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty—
    and I will meditate on your wonderful works.[b]
They tell of the power of your awesome works—
    and I will proclaim your great deeds.
They celebrate your abundant goodness
    and joyfully sing of your righteousness.

 

 

 

Propolis for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Ailments of the body

At times, too much to bear

Can bee treasures give relief

And help with repair?

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

We often get asked at show and festivals, if propolis can help with a particular ailment.  Sometimes, we know, but often we have to do some research by checking out the National Institutes of Health website – nih.gov, to see what studies have been done.  Such was the case a few months ago, when we were asked at WinterFair, if propolis could help with Crohn’s Disease.

We knew that the flavonoids in propolis are antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory, inside and out, so we set about looking for research.  While there are no recent studies with people, we did find some promising animal studies regarding propolis treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorders that represent the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These diseases affect the gastrointestinal tract, and their course is characterized by alternating periods of remission and flare-up.

A study was done in 2013 on rats with induced Crohn’s Disease. Two groups were treated  – one with a propolis water / alcohol extract enema and the other with mesalazine enemas.  Twelve days after the propolis administration, inflammation was reduced in 80% of the animals, 60% had moderate infiltrates and 20% had mild infiltrates. At this time, 60% of the animals treated with mesalazine still had dense infiltrates, 20% had mild infiltrates, and 20% no longer exhibited inflammation.

These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of the propolis treatment was slower, but its scope was wider because it encompassed a higher number of animals than did the mesalazine treatment. The anti-inflammatory effect of mesalazine was more rapid and more pronounced only in the animals that responded well to it (less than half of the treated population).  The inflammation persisted after 12 days of treatment with both drugs.

Rats with induced colitis were also treated with propolis and mesalazine, separately and together.   The scientists  concluded that both treatments are effective alone or in combination.  The anti-inflammatory effect of propolis was shown by the decreased intensity of the inflammation and reduction in number of cysts and abscesses.   They also found that these colitis treatments are more effective when used preventively, before the colitis flares up.

Use of Propolis Hydroalcoholic Extract to Treat Colitis Experimentally Induced in Rats by 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid  can be found at this site: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786476/

When pharmaceuticals fail to help or have risky side effects, propolis may be worth a try!

HEALTH –  POWERED BY BEES

Jeremiah 17

1Lord, you are the hope of Israel;  all who forsake you will be put to shame. 

Those who turn away from you will be written in the dust  because they have forsaken the Lord the spring of living water.

14 Heal me, Lord, and I will be healed; save me and I will be saved, for you are the one I praise. 

 

Propolis for Prevention

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Chill in the air

Trees and birds prepare

For winter’s freeze.

Germs abound, 

Inside and out.

Wise ones use

An ounce of prevention!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Fall is upon us with its cool, crisp and refreshing weather, beautiful changing leaves, and many chance for outdoor fun.  But it also means colder air, dampness, and shutting ourselves indoors at times, with dry, heated and stale air.  It’s a time when germs and viruses seem to populate and insert themselves into our previously healthy bodies.  Kids get exposed to all kinds of germs at school.  We bring home germs from work. No matter what precautions we take, inevitably, someone in the family gets sick.  And once one person is sick, it seems to make its rounds to everyone!  What’s a parent to do?

The good news is, the honeybees make something wonderful that can be used as a preventative dietary supplement to keep your family healthy!  Propolis is a sticky substance the bees make from tree resin.  In the trees, this resin keeps the bud from getting viruses,

propolis on top of frames

propolis on top of frames

fungus, and bacteria.  Once mixed in the bees’ bodies and used to coat every surface inside the hive, bee propolis keeps bacteria, viruses and fungus molds and yeasts from growing in and infecting the hive.  In the fall, the bees continue to add layers of propolis to keep the hive germ-free, seal cracks and insulate for winter.  An experiment done by researchers at The University of Minnesota found that bees housed in a nest box coated with propolis had lower bacterial loads in their body and also ‘quieter’ immune systems compared to the colonies with no propolis coating. Seventy years of research on bee propolis indicates that this substance can also do the same for us!  Propolis can boost our immune system and overall wellness, as well as kill many bacteria and viruses.

Propolis provides general immune system support.   Propolis actually stimulates the immune system and raises the body’s natural resistance. Its antimicrobial properties suppress harmful bacteria and infections.  This powerhouse substance contains 500 times more bioflavonoids than is found in oranges. Flavonoids have strong antioxidant properties and help to protect cells from free radicals and cell mutations.  Propolis contains all the known vitamins, except vitamin K.   Propolis contains 13 of the 14 minerals our bodies reauire, with the exception of sulfur.  You don’t have to swallow a whole handful of vitamins and minerals.  Instead, you can use about 10 drops( about a half-dropperful) of 10% propolis oil or tincture, daily,  to strengthen your immune system and supply your body with ample antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.  And kill those nasty germs before they get established in your body!

 

 Our four  generations of family members and close friends (ages 5-84)  have diligently taken daily propolis during the cold months,  for over four years now.  We can honestly tell you that there have been only 2 visits to the doctor, in these four years, for common ailments among over twenty friends and family.  We triple our dose to three times a day, if we feel like an illness is coming on, and typically symptoms are gone in 1-2 days.  We have staved off upper respiratory infections, sinus infections, migranes, ear infections, colds, cough, and sore throats.
But don’t just take our word for it.  There is much research about propolis as an immune system booster and on its effectiveness against staff, strep, rhinovirus (common cold), upper respiratory infections, chronic ear infections, and many other illnesses.
Here are some links to this research.  To get the general gyst of the articles, read the abstract at the beginning and the summary at the end!

Psalm 132

13 For the Lord has chosen Zion;  he has desired it for his dwelling place:
14 “This is my resting place forever;  here I will dwell, for I have desired it.
15 I will abundantly bless her provisions;  I will satisfy her poor with bread.
16 Her priests I will clothe with salvation,  and her saints will shout for joy.
17 There I will make a horn to sprout for David; I have prepared a lamp for my anointed.
18 His enemies I will clothe with shame, but on him his crown will shine.”

Honey For Healing Newsletter

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BEE Newsletter July15BEE Newsletter July15

Verse of the Day – Isaiah 6:8

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” — Isaiah 6:8

Thoughts on Today’s Verse…Church worship on Sunday is not the goal of our life here on earth. As important as church worship and personal praise are, they are only part of our goal. We are here to glorify God with both our lips and our lives, with our hearts and our hands.

We Can’t All Be the Queen – Lessons from the Bees and The Book

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Psalms from the Hivemuskoka trip day3 369

by Jeannie Saum

Take a lesson from the bees

About how to be

A faithful friend.

It seems that they

Have read The Book

And found that love’s

the key.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how people treat each other – both adults and children.  It was prompted in part by my middle-school-aged granddaughter’s encounter with bullying and racial comments, from her “best friends”.  We’ve all been through times in our childhoods when we were subjected to teasing or name-calling or harassment.  But sometimes, this escalates to the stage of over-the-top bullying or prejudice or down-right meanness.  It’s what causes some grown men and women to carry around the scars of childhood deep inside, into adulthood.  It’s what causes young people to shoot up their classmates at school.

It’s something that sadly, many adults feel is not their problem, believing that kids should be left alone to work it out themselves.  I’m all for kids problem solving and learning to navigate their social circles, but are times when we adults need to intervene,  set the example, be the guardrail, provide guidelines, say enough’s enough  and put a stop to this kind of behavior in our children.

My daughter tried and failed to engage the other parents to get involved and  put a stop to the hurtful behavior of their children – children who need guidance in learning what is acceptable and what is not, how to be a good friend and be kind to one another.  Kids won’t learn what we don’t teach them.

Without cooperation from the other adults, my daughter chose to close ranks with her family to protect her daughter, and  she gave her daughter a wonderful lesson from The Book, about what a true friend really is. The idea came from something she had seen on Facebook, and it was a powerful eye-opener for my granddaughter.  It made her think about what kind of friend she wanted to have and what kind of friend she needed to be.

The task was to read 1 Continthians 13:4-8 and substitute a “friend’s” name ( or your own name) in place of the words “love” and “it”.  For my granddaughter, the question her mom posited was: as we read through this passage, is this person treating you like these standards?   If not, are they truly a friend?

This all got me thinking about a similar situation in my life- the abandonment of a long-held friendship by some adult friends of ours over differences of minor theology.  Sometimes adult friends don’t act any better than children!   I’ve been thinking about the truths and  convictions Steve and I have learned from our faith and life experiences; tenets we’ve tried to live by and teach our children – faithfulness, grace, mercy and love.  I long at times, for others to show us the kind of faithful friendship we try to practice.

As I read these verses in 1 Corinthians,  I can see how all of us often fail to live up to the standards set down in these Bible verses, but it is something to strive for.  And if someone in  life is constantly behaving in the opposite way from these qualities, then one needs to question whether this is a healthy relationship and one where you can trust to let down your boundaries and open your heart, or not.

When compared to these standards,  my granddaughter realized that maybe these girls were not worthy of trusting with her heart and her friendship.  Not to say that she was to treat them badly, or refuse to forgive if amends were offered, but to just keep a distance and move on, seeking more trustworthy and faithful friendships.   And it also gave her guidelines for the kind of friend we want her to be, and the kind of friend we adults in her life strive to be.

I often end up relating my musings with our experiences with our bees.  I think we all could learn something about how we do life with each other from the bees and The Book. The bees have it down. I think their little colonies could be a model, a metaphor, of 1 Corinthians 13:4-8.  How’s this?

First of all, there is only one Queen (like one God in our lives), and the whole hive is all about her.  She is the top bee, the creator of life, all other bees bow before her.  The reason for their life is to serve the queen.  They can’t all be queen – there is only one queen.  She is in charge and sets the tone for the whole hive.  She works hard at what she does, serving the hive – giving life and sustainability -and the other bees, in turn, serve her.

Bees are patient and kind.  The nurse bees take care of the eggs, larvae and pupa for 20 days.  Worker bees don’t brag or try to act like a queen (usually).  They just do their jobs,  the first ones being to clean up the cells, take out the trash, and keep the brood warm.  No big flashy jobs to brag about!

Bees don’t dishonor each other or just think of themselves, rather they live a life of service to the colony – tending to young, grooming each other, building comb, carrying food, and even caring for the dead.  They work together, cooperate, do their tasks and take care of each other.

When a bee finds a good source of pollen or nectar, she doesn’t keep it all to herself.  She comes back and does a joyful dance to communicate to the others, where the good stuff is, so that all may partake!

They take whatever  comes and don’t give up. When humans or animals come into their hive and take their honey or pollen, they just keep making more.  If comb gets damaged, they fix it.  They keep building comb, and foraging for nectar and pollen, and bringing it back to the hive.

muskoka trip day3 374They don’t go looking to do evil.  They really don’t want to sting you and they won’t bother you unless you bother them, or they get trapped.  They just want to go around doing their gathering and pollinating.

Bees protect and defend each other.  They stand their ground to defend their hive against unwanted guests by guarding the entrance and checking out the smell of any creature trying to get in.  If it’s not a friend, they bar the door!  And if one bee gets killed, or one has to sting to defend, they send out attack pheromones to call all the others  bees in to defend.  And the bees practice kind of a tough love – when the drones are not longer needed, they boot them out the door.Image result for bees fanning wings

Those little bees hope and persevere – They go out with hope every day, searching for food and water.  Collectively, they spend months flying back and forth to the hive, bringing in loads of pollen, water,nectar and propolis.  They spend days and weeks fanning their little wings to evaporate the moisture out of the nectar to turn it into honey.

They are loyal no matter what the cost.  The attendant bees keep a protective circle around the queen, tending to her, feeding her, grooming her.  And in the winter, they all cluster around the queen and flap their tiny muscles a million times a minute, creating heat to keep their queen warm.  And sometimes they do this until they die, sacrificing to try to keep their queen alive.  Their whole focus is to keep their colony alive and enduring, and they will do anything and everything it takes.

I think we (adults and children) could all take a lesson in application of 1 Corinthians 13 from the bees!  Can we be patient with our friends, understanding that sometimes they will have bad days, or weeks; that sometimes they will be difficult to deal with and might need an extra measure of grace (undeserved gifts) or mercy ( not getting the punishment they deserve)?

Can we be faithful friends that don’t envy what each other has, or become so proud about what we have, or how upright and “holy” we are that we can not longer be friends with someone who makes a mistake, or has a different philosophy or is going through a hard time?  Can we be the kind of friend that doesn’t always have to get our way? Can we compromise or take turns “being happy”?  Remember, we can’t all be the queen!

Can we be the kind of friend to others who doesn’t have to gossip about them  or put them down to make ourself feel more important? Can we be even-tempered and tolerant of each other’s differences, choosing to overlook little idiosyncrasies and only choosing the most important “hills to die on”?   Can we forgive and forget when our human selves hurt or offend each other?

Can we be the kind of friend that does not stir up drama but can  speak truth in love to kindly shut down ugliness and drama when it comes from another?  Can we be honest with each other,  and when absolutely necessary, practice tough love? Can we wish the best for each other and defend each other against bullies and gossip and hurt?

Can we be the faithful friend that will help and protect someone, even in the hard times, instead of cut and run at the first sign of difficulty?  Can we be the kind of person that someone else can trust to stand by them, keep confidences, be encouraging, and persevere even during the difficult times in the relationship?

Fair-weather friends are not what we need.  Not as children or as adults.  The bees get it – they don’t quit.  They’ll do whatever it takes for the good of the colony.  I believe we are called to succeed and not fail at this faithful servant love that both the bees and The  Book teach us.

Being a faithful friend is something that Steve and I have always strived to be.  To us that means being dedicated to relationships through the good times and the bad times.  It means sometimes giving extra patience and mercy to that “extra-grace-required” friend.  It means over-looking differences of opinion – politics, theology, child rearing, schooling, etc, etc,  – and knowing you can still have a relationship, agreeing to disagree.  It means being willing to put time into people’s lives, being willing to “get dirty” or lend a helping hand or a shoulder to cry on during the tough times.  And yes, sometimes, being  a good friend also means that at crisis points, what might be necessary is a kick out the door, for a time, but working for restoration.  And it also means sticking around long enough through the hard times, to be able to get to the joy!

Our children are grown now, and it’s their turn to practice these things in their relationships and teach their children a few lessons from The Book and the BEES!

 

1 Corinthians 13

from “The Message” Bible

3-7 If I give everything I own to the poor and even go to the stake to be burned as a martyr, but I don’t love, I’ve gotten nowhere. So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.

Love never gives up.
Love cares more for others than for self.
Love doesn’t want what it doesn’t have.
Love doesn’t strut,
Doesn’t have a swelled head,
Doesn’t force itself on others,
Isn’t always “me first,”
Doesn’t fly off the handle,
Doesn’t keep score of the sins of others,
Doesn’t revel when others grovel,
Takes pleasure in the flowering of truth,
Puts up with anything,
Trusts God always,
Always looks for the best,
Never looks back,
But keeps going to the end.

8-10 Love never dies. Inspired speech will be over some day; praying in tongues will end; understanding will reach its limit. We know only a portion of the truth, and what we say about God is always incomplete. But when the Complete arrives, our incompletes will be canceled.

 

 

 

 

Our Hives are Hoppin’!

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Psalms from the HiveIMG_5023

by Jeannie Saum

How many hives can the  honey bees make

If the bees make it through the winter?

Five hives?   Ten hives?  Fifteen? Twenty?

We’re up to twenty-one!

Swarms caught, splits made, nuc boxes full

And five boxes of honey to pull!

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

It’s been IMG_3311quite a spring with our bees, and we feel like we are finally  getting the hang of things after 5 years of beginning beekeeping and many conferences and beekeeper meetings  where we get tons of helpful information.

 

~  ~  ~  ~

 

 

 

At the Dotson Apiary, they had four  hives make it through the winter an20150522_104446d these were thriving and multiplying in early spring.  In the Saum Apiary, we had three make it, but they started the spring out kind of small and weak.  We were happy with the survival rate, compared to last year.

 

~  ~  ~  ~

1413393049315

At the Saum Apiary, we had  a small disaster in the last snow and wind storm in February.  Our tarp wind break broke loose at one end and whipped around in the wind, knocking off the covers of three hives.  We didn’t find this out for several hours, so those bees probably succumbed to the cold and lack of protection.

 

~  ~  ~  ~

swarm

 

We’ve been out in our hives every two weeks, installed four new nuc (5 frame starter hives from an experienced beekeeper with overwintered bees and queens), caught a swarm from one of our hives, captured a swarm after a call from a neighbor, and made five hive splits from the Dotson’s booming hives and started 3 nucs with queen cells we found.

 

~  ~  ~  ~

beeframes DR

 

beeframesbuilding

We’ve also been building massive amounts of  extra equipment – boxes and frames – so we have extra boxes to put on our hives as they grow and make honey during the summer and fall.  Our daughter said our dining room looks like a bee supply company threw up in it!

 

~  ~  ~  ~  ~

 

And next week, we will have five boxes of spring honey to harvest!  We’ll keep you posted as to when that is ready!

 

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And remember, BEEpothecary is back open for business, with a 15% off coupon code  reopen15.  Get to our online market with the tab at the top of the page “Our Products”

Jeremiah 31

10“Hear the word of the Lord, you nations; proclaim it in distant coastlands: ‘He who scattered Israel will gather them and will watch over his flock like a shepherd.’
11 For the Lord will deliver Jacob and redeem them from the hand of those stronger than they.
12 They will come and shout for joy on the heights of Zion; they will rejoice in the bounty of the Lord
the grain, the new wine and the olive oil, the young of the flocks and herds. They will be like a well-watered garden, and they will sorrow no more.
13 Then young women will dance and be glad, young men and old as well. I will turn their mourning into gladness; I will give them comfort and joy instead of sorrow.
14 I will satisfy the priests with abundance, and my people will be filled with my bounty,” declares the Lord.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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