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Propolis for Alzheimer’s Disease

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Food and water, drugs and air

Can add to our demise.

Natural things from nature and bees

Might be a blessing in disguise.

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

One of the characteristics of propolis is its ability to act as an antioxidant in the body.  This means it has the ability to removes potentially damaging oxidizing agents in a living organism. Oxidative stress occurs when an oxygen molecule splits into single atoms with unpaired electrons, which are called free radicals.  This causes damage to cells, proteins and DNA. Free radicals are associated with human disease, including cancer, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and many others. Substances that generate free radicals can be found in the food we eat, the medicines we take, the air we breathe and the water we drink. and include things like fried foods, alcohol, tobacco smoke, pesticides and air pollutants. Scientist are doing research to find out if propolis can be an effective treatment for stopping or slowing down the damage caused by the process of oxidative stress.

One study called, “Effect of propolis flavonoids on Alzheimer disease mice induced by D-galactose,”from 2010,was done in China at Harbin Medical University.  The objective of this study was to research the effects of propolis flavonoids on three antioxidant enzymes in cells , two that protect against oxidative  damage in the brain and one that increases oxidative damage and plays a role in Alzheimer’s  and Parkinson’s Disease.

Sixty mice with Alzheimer’s Disease were divided into six groups.  Three experimental groups were administrated high,middle and low dosages of propolis flavonoids(300,150,75 mg/kg) ORALLY. After 50 days,the mice were killed and brains were examined.  The levels of the two beneficial antioxidants were significantly higher in the experimental groups, while the levels of the destructive  enzyme was significantly lower than that of model group. The conclusion drawn from this research is that propolis flavonoids could increase the brain index, promote the body’s antioxidant activity, enhance the clearance of metabolic waste, and inhibit the activity of the destructive enzyme. Therefore propolis flavonoids could protect cells, delay senility and improve Alzheimer’s Disease symptoms.

Another study, “Bioactive Metabolites from Propolis Inhibit Superoxide Anion Radical, Acetylcholinesterase and Phosphodiesterase (PDE4),” from 2013,  tested the propolis flavonoids’ free radical scavenging activity.  Substances that have this action are considered targets for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and Chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease- COPD. Results of this research showed that propolis could moderately inhibit the destructive free radicals tested  and could contribute to further research on alternative drugs for the treatment of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as asthma and COPD.
A study done in early 2017, “The Neuroprotective Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis on Neurodegenerative Damage in Human Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells” investigated the effects of propolis on oxidative stress in the brain. Oxidative stress and synapse dysfunction are the major neurodegenerative damage correlated to cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have found that Brazilian green propolis (propolis) improves the cognitive functions of mild cognitive impairment patients living at high altitude; however, mechanism underlying the effects of propolis is unknown. The results of the study strongly suggest that propolis protects from the neurodegenerative damage in neurons through the properties of various antioxidants. The present study provides a potential molecular mechanism of Brazilian green propolis in prevention of cognitive impairment in AD as well as aging.
These studies seem to indicate that propolis could be an effective part of treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.  We have to hope that our FDA will someday embrace natural and alternative medicine as successful treatments for disease.

Psalm 103

Praise the Lord, my soul; all my inmost being, praise his holy name.
Praise the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits—
who forgives all your sins and heals all your diseases,
who redeems your life from the pit and crowns you with love and compassion,
who satisfies your desires with good things so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.

Propolis and Liver Disease

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

 

We mistreat our bodies

And suffer consequence.

Can we possibly benefit

From honey bee sense? 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

A few weeks ago, I did a presentation on the health benefits of bee hive resources at our local town hall.  Afterwards, a lady asked me if I knew if propolis helped with non-alcoholic fatty liver.  I told her I would do some research and find out.  Here are some studies I found on the National Institutes of Health website, nih.gov.

7 oz. of raw propolis collected frrom one of our hives

 A study entitled, Does propolis have any effect on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?  (by Kismet, K., et al) has been published in in the  June 2017 edition of Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy.  In this study, 2 different doses of propolis were  given to rats who had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD, and none given to a control group.  Propolis showed a positive effect on the liver tissues upon microscopic examination and also improvement in the biochemistry of the liver tissue. No difference was noted between the two different doses of propolis used.  The positive effects of propolis on NAFLD are related to the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of propolis.

You can read this study at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28437890.

Another study entitled Propolis Decrease Diet-Induced Hepatic Steatosis in Mice was published in 2010 in the international Journal of Morphology.  Hepatic Steatosis is another name for fatty liver.  Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of injuries ranging from simple degeneration by fat deposits to cirrhosis and liver cell cancer. Its main risk factors are disorders associated with metabolic syndrome (MS).  Propolis, a resinous substance produced by honey bee to protect is hive, has demonstrated a hepatoprotective  (liver protective) effect.

This study tested the effect of  Chilean propolis on mice with NAFLD.  Diets of the test groups were supplemented with 10Image result for mice in medical study mg/kg of propolis or 40 mg/kg of propolis, per day. The propolis fed groups showed a gradual decrease in the degeneration by fat deposits and a decrease in inflammation.  It was concluded that the Chilean propolis decreased NAFLD , but that the mechanisms that caused this still must be identified.

You can find this study at:  http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/2010/06/chilean-propolis-decreases-fat-build-up.html

A third study called, The liver-protective properties of the pediatric drug form of propolis in animals of different age groups was done by Drogovoz SM, et. al.  Propolis was studied in experiments on albino rats of various age with toxic liver damages of various duration. In all models of liver abnormalities, propolis was found to show antioxidative properties which were moderate (30-60%). In addition, there were improvements in liver secretion of bile, cholic acids, and cholesterol.

From these studies, it appears that propolis may be a possible contributor to NAFLD treatment, someday.

 

Isaiah 58:8

8 Then your light will break forth like the dawn,
    and your healing will quickly appear;
then your righteousness will go before you,
    and the glory of the Lord will be your rear guard.
Then you will call, and the Lord will answer;
    you will cry for help, and he will say: Here am I.

Research on BEE Products for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’sDisease

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Can nature be the answer,Human Brain Icon Png image #2541

When human-made is not?

What benefits await us

From bee hives’ abundance?

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Parkinson’s disease  is a neurodegenerative brain disorder that progresses slowly in most people. A person’s brain slowly stops producing a neurotransmitter called dopamine. With less and less dopamine, a person has less and less ability to regulate their movements, body and emotions.  Symptoms take years to develop, and people can live for years with the disease.

In Alzheimer’s disease, a process of degeneration still not fully understood, disrupts the communication network in the brain.  In the brain, neurons connect and communicate at synapses, where tiny bursts of chemicals called neurotransmitters carry information from one cell to another. Alzheimer’s disrupts this process, and eventually destroys synapses and kills neurons.

Medications called Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors are  used in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses, such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.  MAOIs are also used for  depressive disorders. MAOI medications elevate the levels of norepinephrine,



 by inhibiting an enzyme called monoamine oxidase (MAO). Monoamine oxidase breaks down norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine. When monoamine oxidase is inhibited, norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine are not broken down, increasing the concentration of all three neurotransmitters in the brain. This can improve symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

In 2013, scientists at Karadeniz Technical University, in Turkey conducted a study of honey bee products – honey, pollen and propolis – to see if they had any capacity to inhibit MAO.  They treated MAO extracted from rat tissue. The three bee products exhibited substantial inhibition of MAO, propolis having the highest effect. Inhibition was related to samples’ phenolic content and antioxidant capacities.

The study suggests that the inhibition of MAO activity may lessen the process of aging.  This study suggests that these apitherapeutic products may also have a role in the treatment of depressive disorders and some neurodegenerative illnesses. In the light of this study, more extensive and detailed studies on specific MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition activity are now needed.

How does this study translate into future treatments for Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s diseases? No one knows…

But it is exciting that  natural bee products are being researched for all kinds of health  issues.

To read the study go to: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/14756366.2013.843171

Isaiah 58:9-11

 If you do away with the yoke of oppression,
    with the pointing finger and malicious talk,
10 and if you spend yourselves in behalf of the hungry
    and satisfy the needs of the oppressed,
then your light will rise in the darkness,
    and your night will become like the noonday.
11 The Lord will guide you always;
    he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land
    and will strengthen your frame.
You will be like a well-watered garden,
    like a spring whose waters never fail.

Fall in the BEE Yard

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

 

Cooler nights and shorter days, 

Bring out jeans and sweaters

And change our ways.

The honey bees,

Make changes too.

Bringing in nectar,

Making lots of goo!

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Fall is officially here and the nights are getting cooler but the daytime temperatures are unpredictable! The temperature can range from high 80’s to somewhere in the 50’s. We never know what to expect! But the bees’ activities this time of year, are always the same. It is time for them to get ready for the coming winter. In the fall, the bees work hard to get a last load of flower nectar into their hive, to make their honey-food for winter. The nectar comes mainly from goldenrod and asters this time of year, giving the fall honey a darker color and bolder taste, For some of us, it is the favorite of all!

20150531_144157If there is an abundance of nectar flowing and not too much rain, the bees will be able to fill up lots of frames of nectar, which they will fan with their tiny wings, to evaporate it down to sweet, dark, flavorful honey. And if they make more than what they need for winter (typically about 100 pounds), they we get to pull some honey frames off for us!! We can’t wait! The bees also collect lots of resin from the trees and use it to make extra propolis in the fall. They will use this sticky goo to seal the hive for winter, filling all the cracks and crevices with globs of propolis and covering all the surfaces with a thin layer. Propolis also kills bacteria, viruses and molds that might be present in the hive, keeping it sanitary and healthy as they hsteve-at-toyead into winter.

We made a trip out to our bee yards this week, to check on our bees and see if there was any fall honey for us.  We found some hives thriving and some sort of struggling along.  We took notes and made plans to check again in a few weeks whenjeannie-scraping the goldenrod and aster nectar flow is over.  Then, we might need to feed some of the smaller hives, to help them build up their stores for winter.  We noted some smaller hives  that may have difficulty making it through the winter.  We are thinking about trying the 2 queen method where you  place a weaker hive atop a stronger hive with 2 queen excluders and a box of honey between them.  Combining them this way allows the worker bees  from both hives to pass through the excluders to get around both hives to move take care of larvae, move honey stores around and help take care of both queens.  We will get out into our apiaries at the beginning of November to decide this, and to prepare our hives for winter.

We also found about 5 boxes of honey we can pull in a few weeks, once it is capped. We are excited about having sweet dark fall honey!   The boxes we pull off are in addition to the honey we will leave for the bees. They will need between 80 and 100 pound to eat during th
e winter so they have energy to shiver their flight muscles, generating heat to keep the queen at 93 degrees all winter!

And our best discovery working in our bee yards was finding several hives that are making tons of propolis. On one hive it was dripping down the sides!   7-oz-propolis-one-hiveWe got 7 ounces  – mostly from one hive – that was in our way and had to be removed.  Most beekeepers would be cursing it and tossing
it over their shoulder into the grass after scraping it off.  But we celebrate because we know how precious it is as a natural health substance.  It’s like gold, to us.  Our gift from the bees.  We have read propolis-isnlidscores and scores of research on propolis and know it has shown to be antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant.  We will use our propolis to make dietary supplements, skin care, shaving products, soaps, and lip balms, all fortified with propolis, because we want everyone to know about propolis and be able to have access to it.

Powered by BEES!

 

TO ALL BEEKEEPERS:

What are you doing with your propolis?  Don’t throw it away!  

Since you have to clean your hives anyway, why not make some money doing it!

We buy propolis by the pound. Save it in baggies as you clean up your equipment.  

Store it in the freezer and call us when you have a pound or more.

We will email you the instructions on how to clean it and give you a price.

We also buy: Beeswax, Honey and Pollen!

Email us:BEEpothecary@gmail.com

1 Peter 1:6-8

In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials.

These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.

Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy,

Ricotta, Honeycomb and Hazelnut with Rhubarb Compote

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BEEpothecary Logo headliner
The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

My Garden is coming along. I still have a lot to do yet, but a friend reminded me that summer hasn’t even started yet! so I do still have a season still ahead.

We have been very busy with our BEES.  Our Spring honey is in!  We have pulled half of the honey from the hives and will pull more in a couple of weeks when the rest is fulling capped.

Jeannie, Me, Pete and Steve inspection one of our hives

Jeannie, Laurie, Pete and Steve inspection one of our hives

 

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Our 7 frame Flow Hive. This is our first season with this new hive and so far we are loving it! It took us 30 minute to extract 35 pounds of honey. No disrupting the hive at all.

IMG_6632

This is a very active hive! Extracting honey !

IMG_6635

Raw Delicious Spring Honey

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMG_6631

Steve and Pete working the Flow Hive! June 2016

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMG_4478

Yummy BEEpothecary Local honey order online: https://squareup.com/market/beepothecary

 
Don’t for get to Check out our Marketplace:  mkt.com/beepothecary
 
 

What to make with our new honey???  Make a something for Father’s Day

Ricotta, honeycomb and hazelnut with rhubarb compote

Honey with the comb is honey pretty much as the bees intended. The idea is to eat the whole thing, comb and all. The comb has a chewy, waxy texture and is perfectly edible, but you can discreetly discard it once you’ve sucked all the honey from it, if you prefer.

Serves 4

1 1/4 cups skin-on hazelnuts
1 1/2 ricotta
1 cup honeycomb

For the compote
5 cups rhubarb, cut into 1 in. pieces
1/4 cup white sugar

1 Preheat the oven to 335. While it’s still a little wet from being washed, add the rhubarb to an ovenproof dish and toss with the sugar. Cover with foil and bake for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Leave to cool completely.

2 Turn the oven up to 350.  Spread the hazelnuts on a baking sheet and toast them in the oven for around 5 minutes, until they are lightly golden and the skins are starting to split.

3 Tip the nuts on to a clean tea towel. Fold the towel over them and rub vigorously. This will remove most of the skins, but don’t worry if a few stubborn bits remain.

4 Divide the ricotta between shallow serving bowls. Add a spoonful of rhubarb compote to each. Break or cut your honeycomb into 4 roughly equal pieces and place on the ricotta and rhubarb, trickling over any honey that has escaped. Scatter over the hazelnuts and serve.

• Recipe supplied by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

 

Propolis and Intestinal Flora

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

What are the things propolis can do

While protecting healthy processes, too?

Don’t want a cure if it’s worse than the ill.

Can propolis be better than taking a pill?

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Another question recently came to us after a propolis presentation at a Beekeepers Club Meeting.  The question was whether propolis was safe to take every day and specifically what effect it had on gut bacteria.  So, back to the research sites I go.

Propolis has a complex chemical composition.   Researchers  found between 104 and 149  different chemicals from samples of propolis collected from around the world. These compounds are grouped  in seven categories: aliphatic acids, aromatic acids, esters, di- and triterpenes, flavonoids, sugars and miscellaneous.  It is not surprising that propolis has anti-microbial properties.

The question is,  if it can inhibit the growth of gastric pathogens like H. pylori, what effect would it have on the normal intestinal microflora or probiotics taken for therapeutic reasons.  The aim of one research project was to grow two typical intestinal/probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium infantis, in milk .  Different concentrations of propolis were added to the milk to test whether propolis would affect their growth and/or metabolism.

The bacteria in milk in the presence of propolis may not reflect their reaction in the intestine, but at least the tests might indicate if medicines containing propolis could effect the intestinal flora or  probiotics.

Six concentrations of propolis were used – 0, 100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 mg/100 ml of milk. (A scant tsp. of 10% propolis tincture provides 333 mg of propolis).  The impact of propolis on both bacteria was concentration dependent. The propolis extract had an adverse effect on the growth of Bif. infantis but was stimulatory to L. acidophilus. The strong antibacterial properties of propolis appear to have affected Bif. infantis more than L. acidophilus. at even at 100 mg of propolis.

Although propolis had an adverse effect on the growth of the bifidobacteria, it did have a desirable influence on the release of beneficial fatty acids. In humans, these fatty acids play an essential role in maintaining the healthy status of the GI tract. A low concentration of propolis (1.0 mg/ml) stimulated a dramatic secretion of these acids.  Thus, patients using propolis might, (despite a possible decline in bifidobacteria), be getting considerable benefit from this increase of fatty acids.

It is not known if propolis ingested, reaches the lower GI tract but it is feasible, if 2-3 g is taken for periods longer than 2 weeks. If one took propolis for  two weeks, then any fall in the population of bifidobacteria would probably pass unnoticed by the patient. But it would interesting to know whether loose stools or mild diarrhea accompanies long term usage of propolis extracts. One could remedy this by eating a yogurt containing a high count of  Bifidobacterium.

Propolis is highly regarded as a medicine with anti-bacterial properties and this study indicates that it could have a positive impact on the intestinal microflora.  The fact that there could be a further benefit for those taking propolis to cure a disease is an attractive prospect.  The full research article can be found at: Propolis stimulating to good gut bacteria.

Another study, done on rats, showed that propolis had a significant protective effect on ileal mucosa (lining of part of the small intestine) and reduced the leaking of bacteria through the intestinal wall to other organs.  This study can be found at:  Propolis – GI issues .

Four generations of our family take propolis – some daily, some three times a day when treating an illness – and not of us have experienced the worsening of gastrointestinal issues.  In some cases, gastro issues have improved.  Many believe propolis and other natural products are safer for our intestinal flora while treating harmful germs, than taking pharmaceuticals, that are known to destroy many good gut bacteria.

Health- Powered by bees!

Psalm 145

I will exalt you, my God the King; 

I will praise your name for ever and ever.

Every day I will praise you 

and extol your name for ever and ever.

Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise;
    his greatness no one can fathom.
One generation commends your works to another;
    they tell of your mighty acts.
They speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty—
    and I will meditate on your wonderful works.[b]
They tell of the power of your awesome works—
    and I will proclaim your great deeds.
They celebrate your abundant goodness
    and joyfully sing of your righteousness.

 

 

 

Propolis for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Ailments of the body

At times, too much to bear

Can bee treasures give relief

And help with repair?

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

We often get asked at show and festivals, if propolis can help with a particular ailment.  Sometimes, we know, but often we have to do some research by checking out the National Institutes of Health website – nih.gov, to see what studies have been done.  Such was the case a few months ago, when we were asked at WinterFair, if propolis could help with Crohn’s Disease.

We knew that the flavonoids in propolis are antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory, inside and out, so we set about looking for research.  While there are no recent studies with people, we did find some promising animal studies regarding propolis treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorders that represent the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These diseases affect the gastrointestinal tract, and their course is characterized by alternating periods of remission and flare-up.

A study was done in 2013 on rats with induced Crohn’s Disease. Two groups were treated  – one with a propolis water / alcohol extract enema and the other with mesalazine enemas.  Twelve days after the propolis administration, inflammation was reduced in 80% of the animals, 60% had moderate infiltrates and 20% had mild infiltrates. At this time, 60% of the animals treated with mesalazine still had dense infiltrates, 20% had mild infiltrates, and 20% no longer exhibited inflammation.

These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of the propolis treatment was slower, but its scope was wider because it encompassed a higher number of animals than did the mesalazine treatment. The anti-inflammatory effect of mesalazine was more rapid and more pronounced only in the animals that responded well to it (less than half of the treated population).  The inflammation persisted after 12 days of treatment with both drugs.

Rats with induced colitis were also treated with propolis and mesalazine, separately and together.   The scientists  concluded that both treatments are effective alone or in combination.  The anti-inflammatory effect of propolis was shown by the decreased intensity of the inflammation and reduction in number of cysts and abscesses.   They also found that these colitis treatments are more effective when used preventively, before the colitis flares up.

Use of Propolis Hydroalcoholic Extract to Treat Colitis Experimentally Induced in Rats by 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid  can be found at this site: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786476/

When pharmaceuticals fail to help or have risky side effects, propolis may be worth a try!

HEALTH –  POWERED BY BEES

Jeremiah 17

1Lord, you are the hope of Israel;  all who forsake you will be put to shame. 

Those who turn away from you will be written in the dust  because they have forsaken the Lord the spring of living water.

14 Heal me, Lord, and I will be healed; save me and I will be saved, for you are the one I praise. 

 

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