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Let Us Tell You About Honey Bee Resources

As beekeepers and bee lovers, we love to share about the riches that come from bee hive resources.   As a business, BEEpothecary creates artisan batches of  health, skin and hair care products made with beehive resources – propolis, honey, pollen and beeswax. We have a particular passion for propolis and have pent several years pouring over scientific research on the use of propolis for health and illness. We have several presentations that we do for beekeeping conferences, honey festivals, individual beekeeper clubs and homesteading/natural living festivals.  We offer Power Point programs with demonstrations and sampling of various products and raw materials. We also buy raw propolis (and other hive resources) from other beekeepers by the pound and can provide instructions for how to clean it to prepare for sale.

Our presentations include:

  • The health benefits of hive resources;
  • How to collect clean and prepare hive products for use in value added products;
  • Different forms of hive products that can be marketed;
  • How to make many different products using bee resources;
  • The categorizing, production and labeling laws that must be followed to market value added hive products other than honey;
  • Honey Bees and Beekeeping, for non-beekeepers
  • Combinations of two or more of these topics in one presentation.

Our speaking charge is $100 for a 45 – 90 min presentation,  plus travel costs.  (We are willing to negotiate, in some cases, for smaller groups with a limited budget.)  We love sharing about the amazing health benefits of hive resources with others! If your club, conference or event is in need of a speaker on any of these topics, please contact us at beepothecary@gmail.com  or call 1-450-2339.

 

HEALTH ~ POWERED BY BEES!

Propolis and Liver Disease

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

 

We mistreat our bodies

And suffer consequence.

Can we possibly benefit

From honey bee sense? 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

A few weeks ago, I did a presentation on the health benefits of bee hive resources at our local town hall.  Afterwards, a lady asked me if I knew if propolis helped with non-alcoholic fatty liver.  I told her I would do some research and find out.  Here are some studies I found on the National Institutes of Health website, nih.gov.

7 oz. of raw propolis collected frrom one of our hives

 A study entitled, Does propolis have any effect on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?  (by Kismet, K., et al) has been published in in the  June 2017 edition of Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy.  In this study, 2 different doses of propolis were  given to rats who had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD, and none given to a control group.  Propolis showed a positive effect on the liver tissues upon microscopic examination and also improvement in the biochemistry of the liver tissue. No difference was noted between the two different doses of propolis used.  The positive effects of propolis on NAFLD are related to the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of propolis.

You can read this study at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28437890.

Another study entitled Propolis Decrease Diet-Induced Hepatic Steatosis in Mice was published in 2010 in the international Journal of Morphology.  Hepatic Steatosis is another name for fatty liver.  Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of injuries ranging from simple degeneration by fat deposits to cirrhosis and liver cell cancer. Its main risk factors are disorders associated with metabolic syndrome (MS).  Propolis, a resinous substance produced by honey bee to protect is hive, has demonstrated a hepatoprotective  (liver protective) effect.

This study tested the effect of  Chilean propolis on mice with NAFLD.  Diets of the test groups were supplemented with 10Image result for mice in medical study mg/kg of propolis or 40 mg/kg of propolis, per day. The propolis fed groups showed a gradual decrease in the degeneration by fat deposits and a decrease in inflammation.  It was concluded that the Chilean propolis decreased NAFLD , but that the mechanisms that caused this still must be identified.

You can find this study at:  http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/2010/06/chilean-propolis-decreases-fat-build-up.html

A third study called, The liver-protective properties of the pediatric drug form of propolis in animals of different age groups was done by Drogovoz SM, et. al.  Propolis was studied in experiments on albino rats of various age with toxic liver damages of various duration. In all models of liver abnormalities, propolis was found to show antioxidative properties which were moderate (30-60%). In addition, there were improvements in liver secretion of bile, cholic acids, and cholesterol.

From these studies, it appears that propolis may be a possible contributor to NAFLD treatment, someday.

 

Isaiah 58:8

8 Then your light will break forth like the dawn,
    and your healing will quickly appear;
then your righteousness will go before you,
    and the glory of the Lord will be your rear guard.
Then you will call, and the Lord will answer;
    you will cry for help, and he will say: Here am I.

Research on BEE Products for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’sDisease

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Can nature be the answer,Human Brain Icon Png image #2541

When human-made is not?

What benefits await us

From bee hives’ abundance?

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Parkinson’s disease  is a neurodegenerative brain disorder that progresses slowly in most people. A person’s brain slowly stops producing a neurotransmitter called dopamine. With less and less dopamine, a person has less and less ability to regulate their movements, body and emotions.  Symptoms take years to develop, and people can live for years with the disease.

In Alzheimer’s disease, a process of degeneration still not fully understood, disrupts the communication network in the brain.  In the brain, neurons connect and communicate at synapses, where tiny bursts of chemicals called neurotransmitters carry information from one cell to another. Alzheimer’s disrupts this process, and eventually destroys synapses and kills neurons.

Medications called Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors are  used in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses, such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.  MAOIs are also used for  depressive disorders. MAOI medications elevate the levels of norepinephrine,



 by inhibiting an enzyme called monoamine oxidase (MAO). Monoamine oxidase breaks down norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine. When monoamine oxidase is inhibited, norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine are not broken down, increasing the concentration of all three neurotransmitters in the brain. This can improve symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

In 2013, scientists at Karadeniz Technical University, in Turkey conducted a study of honey bee products – honey, pollen and propolis – to see if they had any capacity to inhibit MAO.  They treated MAO extracted from rat tissue. The three bee products exhibited substantial inhibition of MAO, propolis having the highest effect. Inhibition was related to samples’ phenolic content and antioxidant capacities.

The study suggests that the inhibition of MAO activity may lessen the process of aging.  This study suggests that these apitherapeutic products may also have a role in the treatment of depressive disorders and some neurodegenerative illnesses. In the light of this study, more extensive and detailed studies on specific MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition activity are now needed.

How does this study translate into future treatments for Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s diseases? No one knows…

But it is exciting that  natural bee products are being researched for all kinds of health  issues.

To read the study go to: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/14756366.2013.843171

Isaiah 58:9-11

 If you do away with the yoke of oppression,
    with the pointing finger and malicious talk,
10 and if you spend yourselves in behalf of the hungry
    and satisfy the needs of the oppressed,
then your light will rise in the darkness,
    and your night will become like the noonday.
11 The Lord will guide you always;
    he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land
    and will strengthen your frame.
You will be like a well-watered garden,
    like a spring whose waters never fail.

Propolis and Intestinal Flora

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

What are the things propolis can do

While protecting healthy processes, too?

Don’t want a cure if it’s worse than the ill.

Can propolis be better than taking a pill?

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Another question recently came to us after a propolis presentation at a Beekeepers Club Meeting.  The question was whether propolis was safe to take every day and specifically what effect it had on gut bacteria.  So, back to the research sites I go.

Propolis has a complex chemical composition.   Researchers  found between 104 and 149  different chemicals from samples of propolis collected from around the world. These compounds are grouped  in seven categories: aliphatic acids, aromatic acids, esters, di- and triterpenes, flavonoids, sugars and miscellaneous.  It is not surprising that propolis has anti-microbial properties.

The question is,  if it can inhibit the growth of gastric pathogens like H. pylori, what effect would it have on the normal intestinal microflora or probiotics taken for therapeutic reasons.  The aim of one research project was to grow two typical intestinal/probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium infantis, in milk .  Different concentrations of propolis were added to the milk to test whether propolis would affect their growth and/or metabolism.

The bacteria in milk in the presence of propolis may not reflect their reaction in the intestine, but at least the tests might indicate if medicines containing propolis could effect the intestinal flora or  probiotics.

Six concentrations of propolis were used – 0, 100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 mg/100 ml of milk. (A scant tsp. of 10% propolis tincture provides 333 mg of propolis).  The impact of propolis on both bacteria was concentration dependent. The propolis extract had an adverse effect on the growth of Bif. infantis but was stimulatory to L. acidophilus. The strong antibacterial properties of propolis appear to have affected Bif. infantis more than L. acidophilus. at even at 100 mg of propolis.

Although propolis had an adverse effect on the growth of the bifidobacteria, it did have a desirable influence on the release of beneficial fatty acids. In humans, these fatty acids play an essential role in maintaining the healthy status of the GI tract. A low concentration of propolis (1.0 mg/ml) stimulated a dramatic secretion of these acids.  Thus, patients using propolis might, (despite a possible decline in bifidobacteria), be getting considerable benefit from this increase of fatty acids.

It is not known if propolis ingested, reaches the lower GI tract but it is feasible, if 2-3 g is taken for periods longer than 2 weeks. If one took propolis for  two weeks, then any fall in the population of bifidobacteria would probably pass unnoticed by the patient. But it would interesting to know whether loose stools or mild diarrhea accompanies long term usage of propolis extracts. One could remedy this by eating a yogurt containing a high count of  Bifidobacterium.

Propolis is highly regarded as a medicine with anti-bacterial properties and this study indicates that it could have a positive impact on the intestinal microflora.  The fact that there could be a further benefit for those taking propolis to cure a disease is an attractive prospect.  The full research article can be found at: Propolis stimulating to good gut bacteria.

Another study, done on rats, showed that propolis had a significant protective effect on ileal mucosa (lining of part of the small intestine) and reduced the leaking of bacteria through the intestinal wall to other organs.  This study can be found at:  Propolis – GI issues .

Four generations of our family take propolis – some daily, some three times a day when treating an illness – and not of us have experienced the worsening of gastrointestinal issues.  In some cases, gastro issues have improved.  Many believe propolis and other natural products are safer for our intestinal flora while treating harmful germs, than taking pharmaceuticals, that are known to destroy many good gut bacteria.

Health- Powered by bees!

Psalm 145

I will exalt you, my God the King; 

I will praise your name for ever and ever.

Every day I will praise you 

and extol your name for ever and ever.

Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise;
    his greatness no one can fathom.
One generation commends your works to another;
    they tell of your mighty acts.
They speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty—
    and I will meditate on your wonderful works.[b]
They tell of the power of your awesome works—
    and I will proclaim your great deeds.
They celebrate your abundant goodness
    and joyfully sing of your righteousness.

 

 

 

Propolis for Prevention

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Chill in the air

Trees and birds prepare

For winter’s freeze.

Germs abound, 

Inside and out.

Wise ones use

An ounce of prevention!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Fall is upon us with its cool, crisp and refreshing weather, beautiful changing leaves, and many chance for outdoor fun.  But it also means colder air, dampness, and shutting ourselves indoors at times, with dry, heated and stale air.  It’s a time when germs and viruses seem to populate and insert themselves into our previously healthy bodies.  Kids get exposed to all kinds of germs at school.  We bring home germs from work. No matter what precautions we take, inevitably, someone in the family gets sick.  And once one person is sick, it seems to make its rounds to everyone!  What’s a parent to do?

The good news is, the honeybees make something wonderful that can be used as a preventative dietary supplement to keep your family healthy!  Propolis is a sticky substance the bees make from tree resin.  In the trees, this resin keeps the bud from getting viruses,

propolis on top of frames

propolis on top of frames

fungus, and bacteria.  Once mixed in the bees’ bodies and used to coat every surface inside the hive, bee propolis keeps bacteria, viruses and fungus molds and yeasts from growing in and infecting the hive.  In the fall, the bees continue to add layers of propolis to keep the hive germ-free, seal cracks and insulate for winter.  An experiment done by researchers at The University of Minnesota found that bees housed in a nest box coated with propolis had lower bacterial loads in their body and also ‘quieter’ immune systems compared to the colonies with no propolis coating. Seventy years of research on bee propolis indicates that this substance can also do the same for us!  Propolis can boost our immune system and overall wellness, as well as kill many bacteria and viruses.

Propolis provides general immune system support.   Propolis actually stimulates the immune system and raises the body’s natural resistance. Its antimicrobial properties suppress harmful bacteria and infections.  This powerhouse substance contains 500 times more bioflavonoids than is found in oranges. Flavonoids have strong antioxidant properties and help to protect cells from free radicals and cell mutations.  Propolis contains all the known vitamins, except vitamin K.   Propolis contains 13 of the 14 minerals our bodies reauire, with the exception of sulfur.  You don’t have to swallow a whole handful of vitamins and minerals.  Instead, you can use about 10 drops( about a half-dropperful) of 10% propolis oil or tincture, daily,  to strengthen your immune system and supply your body with ample antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.  And kill those nasty germs before they get established in your body!

 

 Our four  generations of family members and close friends (ages 5-84)  have diligently taken daily propolis during the cold months,  for over four years now.  We can honestly tell you that there have been only 2 visits to the doctor, in these four years, for common ailments among over twenty friends and family.  We triple our dose to three times a day, if we feel like an illness is coming on, and typically symptoms are gone in 1-2 days.  We have staved off upper respiratory infections, sinus infections, migranes, ear infections, colds, cough, and sore throats.
But don’t just take our word for it.  There is much research about propolis as an immune system booster and on its effectiveness against staff, strep, rhinovirus (common cold), upper respiratory infections, chronic ear infections, and many other illnesses.
Here are some links to this research.  To get the general gyst of the articles, read the abstract at the beginning and the summary at the end!

Psalm 132

13 For the Lord has chosen Zion;  he has desired it for his dwelling place:
14 “This is my resting place forever;  here I will dwell, for I have desired it.
15 I will abundantly bless her provisions;  I will satisfy her poor with bread.
16 Her priests I will clothe with salvation,  and her saints will shout for joy.
17 There I will make a horn to sprout for David; I have prepared a lamp for my anointed.
18 His enemies I will clothe with shame, but on him his crown will shine.”

Honey and all it’s goodness

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

Superpowers? Honey, who knew?

It was brought to my attention last week that September is in fact National Honey Month. Honey gets an entire month all to itself?  Why yes, it certainly does.  We celebrate it at the Lithopolis Honeyfest, in Lithopolis Ohio!

BEEpothecary will have a booth with all our fabulous products!

!!!!!Planning ahead!!!!!

Mark your calendar  September 11-12, 2015

LithopThe Lithopolis Honeyfest will be going on the FRIDAY & SATURDAY AFTER LABOR DAY
FREE ADMISSION, FREE SHUTTLE & FREE PARKING CALL FOR DETAILS 614-837-2013

Lithopolis HoneyFest

Turns out that Americans consume 1.5 pounds of honey per person annually, and there are more than 300 types of honey in the United States alone. That’s impressive, and we figured that if honey gets to be honored all month long, the least we could do is give you 20 different uses for it. Enjoy!

1. Put it on your lipshoney on lips

Did you know that making your own lip balm is as easy as tracking down some almond oil, beeswax and honey? Sure is. Makes you feel a little guilty about that $10 version you picked up at the health food store yesterday, doesn’t it?  Lip Honey made by BEEpothecary

2. Make your own honey moisturizer

If you’ve got a handful of sweet smelling herbs — think lavender — laying around and ready to be used, why not use them for your own homemade honey lotion? Warm honey over a saucepan until it gets to a liquid consistency. Pour honey over herbs and cap tightly; the ratio you want to use is 1 tablespoon of herbs per 8 ounces of honey. Let sit for a week and then mix 1 teaspoon of liquid into an 8 ounce bottle of unscented lotion.

3. Eat it with goat cheesehoney and goats cheese

In need of a classy hors d’oeuvre but lacking in the time department? Try this: put a round of goat cheese in a ramekin, sprinkle honey and chopped walnuts on top and place in oven at 350F until honey and cheese are both soft. Serve with baguette or crackers and you’ll be the life of the party.

4. Prepare for the end of the world

Screen Shot 2015-07-10 at 1.49.11 PM

You never know what’s going to happen, so stock it. Now.

5. Drink it

We all know a drop of honey in tea is good for a sore throat, but you can add it to most drinks for an extra energy boost. And simply because it’s a whole lot better than tossing in a few Sweet ‘N Lows.

6. Make a saladScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 1.52.35 PM

One of my favorite and easiest fruit salads uses just a touch of honey to enhance the sugars in the fruit, and it’s a perfect late summer dessert.
1 cantaloupe, chopped
3 nectarines, chopped
4 tablespoons chopped basil
2 tablespoons honey
Mix together and enjoy!

7. Give yourself a facialScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 1.56.06 PM

Honey is a natural humectant with antimicrobial properties, which means your skin will be happy when you give it some sweet honey love. Try a basic honey wash by mixing a dollop of honey and two tablespoons of warm water and massaging the mixture into your skin. Or you can go all out and try the Cucumber Honey Facial.

8. Go the extra milebeebread no bakes

Forget energy bars and shots, just pop a tablespoon of honey before your next workout. Seriously, it has been proven to boost athletic performance.

9. Remove parasites20141024_114058

Got a post-Southeast Asia backpacking trip bug that just won’t leave you alone? Mix up a good blend of honey, water and vinegar and you’ll quickly be on your way to being parasite free.

10. Clean your cuts and scrapesScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.01.32 PM

Honey can actually be used as an antiseptic, like a natural Neosporin. Because of its many antimicrobial properties, it can be used to treat wounds and even burns.

11. Get rid of your hangoverScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.02.53 PM

Forget a morning of popping ibuprofen, spread some honey on your toast or add some to your tea. Because honey is loaded with fructose, it will help speed up the metabolism of alcohol.

12. Clear up your dry elbowsBEEpothecary Wildflower Honey

Nothing’s worse than scratchy elbows (no really) so next time, after you’ve washed and scrubbed, rub some honey on to soften the skin. Leave on for 30 minutes then wash off.

13. Soften your skin

Honey is an excellent exfoliant. You can pair it with ground almonds or bee pollen and lemon juice for a killer homemade facial scrub.

14. Mix a drinkScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.05.45 PM

After you’ve been busy reaping all the health benefits that honey has to offer, it’s time to celebrate, and what better way than with a good ole cocktail. Honey Gin Cocktail? Bring it.

15. Eat the honeycomb. No really, just do it.

Yes, it can be done! One of our fave food bloggers Clotilde Dusoulier, of Chocolate & Zucchini, put the ingredient to her readers and got some fun responses. The best sounding one? Mix it with crunchy peanut butter on toast.

16. Get an energy boostScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.10.00 PM

Feeling a tad lethargic? Skip the coffee and go for the honey instead. Mix a tablespoon into a cup of tea and you’ll be feeling better in no time.

17. Beautify your hairScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.15.37 PM

In the shower, after you wash your, coat the ends with a bit of honey. Let it sit for a few minutes before rinsing out and you’ll find that your hair is less frizzy and extra conditioned. Or make your hair shiny and bright by adding one teaspoon honey to one quart of water, and after washing your hair, pouring the mixture over your head. Let dry and enjoy your new-found shiny do.

18. Preserve fruitScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.17.36 PM

Jam is so five years ago; show you’re truly cutting edge by preserving your fruits in a honey sauce. All it takes is one part honey to ten parts water and then covering your berries. Pretty much the closest you’re ever going to get to bottling up a little bit of summer.

19. Relax in the tubScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.19.12 PM

Add a few tablespoons of honey to your bath, for sweeter smelling, softer feeling water. Pure bliss.

20. Lose weightScreen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.20.55 PM

Well, what were you expecting? With a list this long it had to be pretty apparent that honey is in fact a wonder food, and as it turns out, you can even make it part of your next weight loss plan. Honey is an excellent substitute for sugar and it also helps speed up metabolism. Just remember: all things in moderation.

https://squareup.com/market/beepothecary

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anna-brones/20-unusual-uses-for-honey_b_949475.html

1 Thessalonians 3:11 Now may our God and Father himself, and our Lord Jesus, direct our way to you, 12 and may the Lord make you increase and abound in love for one another and for all, as we do for you, 13 so that he may establish your hearts blameless in holiness before our God and Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all his saints.

Honey For Healing Newsletter

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BEE Newsletter July15BEE Newsletter July15

Verse of the Day – Isaiah 6:8

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” — Isaiah 6:8

Thoughts on Today’s Verse…Church worship on Sunday is not the goal of our life here on earth. As important as church worship and personal praise are, they are only part of our goal. We are here to glorify God with both our lips and our lives, with our hearts and our hands.

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