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Beeswax Helps Treat Burns

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Beeswax Helps Treat Burns

A human research study was done in 2014-15  to determine the effect of a beeswax, olive oil and Alkanna tinctoria (L.) Tausch mixture on burn injuries: healing, pain during dressing changes and duration of hospital stay. Alkanna tinctoria is another name for Alkanet herb or Dyer’s Alkanet, which is in the borage family.

This study was planned to investigate the effect of a mixture of beeswax, olive oil and A. Tinctoria (L.) Tausch on burn wounds to determine the impact on burn healing, pain during dressing changes and duration of hospital stay.

METHODS:

The study was conducted between May 2014 and August 2015 in the Burn Unit of Ataturk University Research Hospital. The sample of this experimental study consisted of 64 patients (31 experimental group and 33 control group) who met its inclusion criteria. While the specially prepared dressing material was applied to the experimental group, the control group was administered the clinic’s routine dressing. The injuries were photographed before each dressing. Each picture was uploaded to a computer for measurement with ImageJ software…

When a beeswax, olive oil and A. tinctoria (L.) Tausch mixture was applied to second degree burns, this accelerated epithelization, (growth of granulated tissue across a wound) reduced the pain experienced during dressing changes and shortened the hospital stay durations of the patients.

2 Kings 20:5

This is what the Lord, the God of your father David, says:

I have heard your prayer and seen your tears; I will heal you.

Speakers Available!

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Let Us Tell You About Honey Bee Resources

As beekeepers and bee lovers, we love to share about the riches that come from bee hive resources.   As a business, BEEpothecary creates artisan batches of  health, skin and hair care products made with beehive resources – propolis, honey, pollen and beeswax. We have a particular passion for propolis and have pent several years pouring over scientific research on the use of propolis for health and illness. We have several presentations that we do for beekeeping conferences, honey festivals, individual beekeeper clubs and homesteading/natural living festivals.  We offer Power Point programs with demonstrations and sampling of various products and raw materials. We also buy raw propolis (and other hive resources) from other beekeepers by the pound and can provide instructions for how to clean it to prepare for sale.

Our presentations include:

  • The health benefits of hive resources;
  • How to collect clean and prepare hive products for use in value added products;
  • Different forms of hive products that can be marketed;
  • How to make many different products using bee resources;
  • The categorizing, production and labeling laws that must be followed to market value added hive products other than honey;
  • Honey Bees and Beekeeping, for non-beekeepers
  • Combinations of two or more of these topics in one presentation.

Our speaking charge is $100 for a 45 – 90 min presentation,  plus travel costs.  (We are willing to negotiate, in some cases, for smaller groups with a limited budget.)  We love sharing about the amazing health benefits of hive resources with others! If your club, conference or event is in need of a speaker on any of these topics, please contact us at beepothecary@gmail.com  or call 1-450-2339.

 

HEALTH ~ POWERED BY BEES!

Propolis for Alzheimer’s Disease

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Food and water, drugs and air

Can add to our demise.

Natural things from nature and bees

Might be a blessing in disguise.

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

One of the characteristics of propolis is its ability to act as an antioxidant in the body.  This means it has the ability to removes potentially damaging oxidizing agents in a living organism. Oxidative stress occurs when an oxygen molecule splits into single atoms with unpaired electrons, which are called free radicals.  This causes damage to cells, proteins and DNA. Free radicals are associated with human disease, including cancer, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and many others. Substances that generate free radicals can be found in the food we eat, the medicines we take, the air we breathe and the water we drink. and include things like fried foods, alcohol, tobacco smoke, pesticides and air pollutants. Scientist are doing research to find out if propolis can be an effective treatment for stopping or slowing down the damage caused by the process of oxidative stress.

One study called, “Effect of propolis flavonoids on Alzheimer disease mice induced by D-galactose,”from 2010,was done in China at Harbin Medical University.  The objective of this study was to research the effects of propolis flavonoids on three antioxidant enzymes in cells , two that protect against oxidative  damage in the brain and one that increases oxidative damage and plays a role in Alzheimer’s  and Parkinson’s Disease.

Sixty mice with Alzheimer’s Disease were divided into six groups.  Three experimental groups were administrated high,middle and low dosages of propolis flavonoids(300,150,75 mg/kg) ORALLY. After 50 days,the mice were killed and brains were examined.  The levels of the two beneficial antioxidants were significantly higher in the experimental groups, while the levels of the destructive  enzyme was significantly lower than that of model group. The conclusion drawn from this research is that propolis flavonoids could increase the brain index, promote the body’s antioxidant activity, enhance the clearance of metabolic waste, and inhibit the activity of the destructive enzyme. Therefore propolis flavonoids could protect cells, delay senility and improve Alzheimer’s Disease symptoms.

Another study, “Bioactive Metabolites from Propolis Inhibit Superoxide Anion Radical, Acetylcholinesterase and Phosphodiesterase (PDE4),” from 2013,  tested the propolis flavonoids’ free radical scavenging activity.  Substances that have this action are considered targets for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and Chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease- COPD. Results of this research showed that propolis could moderately inhibit the destructive free radicals tested  and could contribute to further research on alternative drugs for the treatment of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as asthma and COPD.
A study done in early 2017, “The Neuroprotective Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis on Neurodegenerative Damage in Human Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells” investigated the effects of propolis on oxidative stress in the brain. Oxidative stress and synapse dysfunction are the major neurodegenerative damage correlated to cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have found that Brazilian green propolis (propolis) improves the cognitive functions of mild cognitive impairment patients living at high altitude; however, mechanism underlying the effects of propolis is unknown. The results of the study strongly suggest that propolis protects from the neurodegenerative damage in neurons through the properties of various antioxidants. The present study provides a potential molecular mechanism of Brazilian green propolis in prevention of cognitive impairment in AD as well as aging.
These studies seem to indicate that propolis could be an effective part of treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.  We have to hope that our FDA will someday embrace natural and alternative medicine as successful treatments for disease.

Psalm 103

Praise the Lord, my soul; all my inmost being, praise his holy name.
Praise the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits—
who forgives all your sins and heals all your diseases,
who redeems your life from the pit and crowns you with love and compassion,
who satisfies your desires with good things so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.

Summer of Swarms

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Psalms from the Hive, by Jeannie Saum

Bees get crowded in summer days

And send out foragers looking for ways

To direct the colony to a new home.

They load their bodies with pollen  and honey

Queen and half the bees make a run for the money

Swarming off into the sky.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical

We’re not sure why the bees seem to be swarming more this summer, but it is really keeping us busy.  We get one to three calls a week from people who need help with a bee swarm in their

yard, or a sudden infestation of bees in some part of their house.  My husband Steve, and his side-kick, our son Nate, have become the BEEpothecary BEE Wranglers of Groveport and SE Columbus!

Steve

Nate

Why do they do it? Free bees!  When they go out to capture swarms or clear out bees from someone’s wall or garage or eaves, they bring back the bees and add them to a hive body in our bee apiary, and we have a new hive!  When a package of bees from the south costs $95, and a small starter nucleus hive costs $125, catching swarms is a great cost saving way to increase our hive numbers!  More bees means more honey, propolis, pollen and beeswax!

Steve getting behind a gutter to find the hive.

Swarm high up in our tree. We got this one!

Why do bee hives swarm?  It is a natural tendency of bee colonies. In a natural hive in a tree or log, the bee colony will swarm whenever it runs out of room.  This is the way bees increase their numbers and their colonies in nature.  The queen bee has been kept alive all winter by her worker females creating heat by shivering their bodies in a cluster around her.  In the spring when the weather warms up, the queen starts laying eggs again and the worker bees begin collecting pollen and nectar.  As the bee population in the hive increases, and more pollen and nectar are brought in, they start running out of room in the hive.  If a beekeeper isn’t inspecting their managed hives soon enough, and adding boxes with more space, the hive will do what it is ingrained to do – swarm.

Pheromones given off by the bees direct the colony to start making swarm cells for new queens. These chemical

This swarm flew right out of the nuc box and disappeared! Bummer!

signals cause the scout bees to go out to find a new home and the forager bees to load up their bodies with pollen and honey.  Then, one day the queen and half the bees, loaded down with food, leave the hive, create a big tornado like swirl of bees in the air, and eventually land in a tree or bush, usually fairly close at first.  They rest there, until the scout bees show them where to go next.  This is not good for the beekeeper because it means you have lost half the bees in that hive.  Fewer bees mean less honey, pollen and propolis!

If you’re lucky, you see the swarm resting on a tree or busy in your yard, and can go out and capture your own swarm and put them in a new hive set up. But often, they fly away and end up in someone else’s yard, tree or house!

Nate cutting a limb with a swarm

When Steve and Nate go out swarm catching this is how they do it.  If the swarm is in a tree or bush, it’s easy – as long as it is not too high up!  All they have to do is cut the limb and shake, or just bump the limb and shake it over a “nuc box”.  This is a small cardboard box that holds 5 frames of beeswax comb for a nucleus hiv

Sometimes, the queen somehow hangs onto the limb, while the other bees fall off and into the box.  When this happens, the bees in the box won’t stay.  They fly right back up to the queen on the  limb!  So sometimes the bumping of the limb as to be done a few times, or a bee brush used gently to try to get all  the bees and the queen off the limb and into the box.  Once they get the queen in the box, all the other bees will follow her in.  They look like a miniature army marching off to war, right into the box.

 

 

If the bees have found a little tiny hole to go through to get into the eaves or the wall of someones house, it becomes a more difficult job and usually there is a charge involved for doing the

Loose bricks in historic home – an invitation for bees to build a nest!

extraction.  This usually requires a ladder, tools and the removal of part of the house – fascia board,

Bee hive in the wall behind the bricks.

gutter, soffit or sometimes even cutting out wallboard inside the house.  And if the bees are inside the house, they have already started building beeswax comb and bringing in pollen and nectar. The queen is already laying eggs. So all this must be cut out.  A lot of work, but good for us, because Steve and Nate bring home not just the queen and the bees, but also the new comb and larvae already laid.  This goes into a new hive set up in our apiary.  We rubber band the  oddly shaped beeswax comb into the wooden frames in the hive box.

Most exterminators these days don’t want to mess with extracting bees.  First of all, they know the bees are important and need to be saved, not exterminated.  But secondly, killing the bees is only part of the job.  If you don’t remove the wax comb full of nectar and pollen and larvae, it will decay, and smell and eventually

Bee hive behind fascia board and gutter.

seep through the wall board into the house!  Exterminators don’t want to

Nate getting a bee hive way up high behind gutter.

deal with that!

So, if you see a swarm, or you end up with an infestation in your home, don’t hesitate to call the BEEpothecary BEE Wranglers! 614-450-2339.

 

 

 

 

 

Steve digging out another fascia board infestation.

Getting the bees in the nuc box.

Making sure he’s got them all.

 

 

Psalm 104:

27 All creatures look to you to give them their food at the proper time.
28 When you give it to them, they gather it up;
when you open your hand, they are satisfied with good things.
29 When you hide your face, they are terrified;
when you take away their breath, they die and return to the dust.
30 When you send your Spirit, they are created,
    and you renew the face of the ground.

31 May the glory of the Lord endure forever; may the Lord rejoice in his works—

32 he who looks at the earth, and it trembles, who touches the mountains, and they smoke.

We Can’t All Be the Queen – Lessons from the Bees and The Book

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Psalms from the Hivemuskoka trip day3 369

by Jeannie Saum

Take a lesson from the bees

About how to be

A faithful friend.

It seems that they

Have read The Book

And found that love’s

the key.

 

Clover, Bee, and Revery

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how people treat each other – both adults and children.  It was prompted in part by my middle-school-aged granddaughter’s encounter with bullying and racial comments, from her “best friends”.  We’ve all been through times in our childhoods when we were subjected to teasing or name-calling or harassment.  But sometimes, this escalates to the stage of over-the-top bullying or prejudice or down-right meanness.  It’s what causes some grown men and women to carry around the scars of childhood deep inside, into adulthood.  It’s what causes young people to shoot up their classmates at school.

It’s something that sadly, many adults feel is not their problem, believing that kids should be left alone to work it out themselves.  I’m all for kids problem solving and learning to navigate their social circles, but are times when we adults need to intervene,  set the example, be the guardrail, provide guidelines, say enough’s enough  and put a stop to this kind of behavior in our children.

My daughter tried and failed to engage the other parents to get involved and  put a stop to the hurtful behavior of their children – children who need guidance in learning what is acceptable and what is not, how to be a good friend and be kind to one another.  Kids won’t learn what we don’t teach them.

Without cooperation from the other adults, my daughter chose to close ranks with her family to protect her daughter, and  she gave her daughter a wonderful lesson from The Book, about what a true friend really is. The idea came from something she had seen on Facebook, and it was a powerful eye-opener for my granddaughter.  It made her think about what kind of friend she wanted to have and what kind of friend she needed to be.

The task was to read 1 Continthians 13:4-8 and substitute a “friend’s” name ( or your own name) in place of the words “love” and “it”.  For my granddaughter, the question her mom posited was: as we read through this passage, is this person treating you like these standards?   If not, are they truly a friend?

This all got me thinking about a similar situation in my life- the abandonment of a long-held friendship by some adult friends of ours over differences of minor theology.  Sometimes adult friends don’t act any better than children!   I’ve been thinking about the truths and  convictions Steve and I have learned from our faith and life experiences; tenets we’ve tried to live by and teach our children – faithfulness, grace, mercy and love.  I long at times, for others to show us the kind of faithful friendship we try to practice.

As I read these verses in 1 Corinthians,  I can see how all of us often fail to live up to the standards set down in these Bible verses, but it is something to strive for.  And if someone in  life is constantly behaving in the opposite way from these qualities, then one needs to question whether this is a healthy relationship and one where you can trust to let down your boundaries and open your heart, or not.

When compared to these standards,  my granddaughter realized that maybe these girls were not worthy of trusting with her heart and her friendship.  Not to say that she was to treat them badly, or refuse to forgive if amends were offered, but to just keep a distance and move on, seeking more trustworthy and faithful friendships.   And it also gave her guidelines for the kind of friend we want her to be, and the kind of friend we adults in her life strive to be.

I often end up relating my musings with our experiences with our bees.  I think we all could learn something about how we do life with each other from the bees and The Book. The bees have it down. I think their little colonies could be a model, a metaphor, of 1 Corinthians 13:4-8.  How’s this?

First of all, there is only one Queen (like one God in our lives), and the whole hive is all about her.  She is the top bee, the creator of life, all other bees bow before her.  The reason for their life is to serve the queen.  They can’t all be queen – there is only one queen.  She is in charge and sets the tone for the whole hive.  She works hard at what she does, serving the hive – giving life and sustainability -and the other bees, in turn, serve her.

Bees are patient and kind.  The nurse bees take care of the eggs, larvae and pupa for 20 days.  Worker bees don’t brag or try to act like a queen (usually).  They just do their jobs,  the first ones being to clean up the cells, take out the trash, and keep the brood warm.  No big flashy jobs to brag about!

Bees don’t dishonor each other or just think of themselves, rather they live a life of service to the colony – tending to young, grooming each other, building comb, carrying food, and even caring for the dead.  They work together, cooperate, do their tasks and take care of each other.

When a bee finds a good source of pollen or nectar, she doesn’t keep it all to herself.  She comes back and does a joyful dance to communicate to the others, where the good stuff is, so that all may partake!

They take whatever  comes and don’t give up. When humans or animals come into their hive and take their honey or pollen, they just keep making more.  If comb gets damaged, they fix it.  They keep building comb, and foraging for nectar and pollen, and bringing it back to the hive.

muskoka trip day3 374They don’t go looking to do evil.  They really don’t want to sting you and they won’t bother you unless you bother them, or they get trapped.  They just want to go around doing their gathering and pollinating.

Bees protect and defend each other.  They stand their ground to defend their hive against unwanted guests by guarding the entrance and checking out the smell of any creature trying to get in.  If it’s not a friend, they bar the door!  And if one bee gets killed, or one has to sting to defend, they send out attack pheromones to call all the others  bees in to defend.  And the bees practice kind of a tough love – when the drones are not longer needed, they boot them out the door.Image result for bees fanning wings

Those little bees hope and persevere – They go out with hope every day, searching for food and water.  Collectively, they spend months flying back and forth to the hive, bringing in loads of pollen, water,nectar and propolis.  They spend days and weeks fanning their little wings to evaporate the moisture out of the nectar to turn it into honey.

They are loyal no matter what the cost.  The attendant bees keep a protective circle around the queen, tending to her, feeding her, grooming her.  And in the winter, they all cluster around the queen and flap their tiny muscles a million times a minute, creating heat to keep their queen warm.  And sometimes they do this until they die, sacrificing to try to keep their queen alive.  Their whole focus is to keep their colony alive and enduring, and they will do anything and everything it takes.

I think we (adults and children) could all take a lesson in application of 1 Corinthians 13 from the bees!  Can we be patient with our friends, understanding that sometimes they will have bad days, or weeks; that sometimes they will be difficult to deal with and might need an extra measure of grace (undeserved gifts) or mercy ( not getting the punishment they deserve)?

Can we be faithful friends that don’t envy what each other has, or become so proud about what we have, or how upright and “holy” we are that we can not longer be friends with someone who makes a mistake, or has a different philosophy or is going through a hard time?  Can we be the kind of friend that doesn’t always have to get our way? Can we compromise or take turns “being happy”?  Remember, we can’t all be the queen!

Can we be the kind of friend to others who doesn’t have to gossip about them  or put them down to make ourself feel more important? Can we be even-tempered and tolerant of each other’s differences, choosing to overlook little idiosyncrasies and only choosing the most important “hills to die on”?   Can we forgive and forget when our human selves hurt or offend each other?

Can we be the kind of friend that does not stir up drama but can  speak truth in love to kindly shut down ugliness and drama when it comes from another?  Can we be honest with each other,  and when absolutely necessary, practice tough love? Can we wish the best for each other and defend each other against bullies and gossip and hurt?

Can we be the faithful friend that will help and protect someone, even in the hard times, instead of cut and run at the first sign of difficulty?  Can we be the kind of person that someone else can trust to stand by them, keep confidences, be encouraging, and persevere even during the difficult times in the relationship?

Fair-weather friends are not what we need.  Not as children or as adults.  The bees get it – they don’t quit.  They’ll do whatever it takes for the good of the colony.  I believe we are called to succeed and not fail at this faithful servant love that both the bees and The  Book teach us.

Being a faithful friend is something that Steve and I have always strived to be.  To us that means being dedicated to relationships through the good times and the bad times.  It means sometimes giving extra patience and mercy to that “extra-grace-required” friend.  It means over-looking differences of opinion – politics, theology, child rearing, schooling, etc, etc,  – and knowing you can still have a relationship, agreeing to disagree.  It means being willing to put time into people’s lives, being willing to “get dirty” or lend a helping hand or a shoulder to cry on during the tough times.  And yes, sometimes, being  a good friend also means that at crisis points, what might be necessary is a kick out the door, for a time, but working for restoration.  And it also means sticking around long enough through the hard times, to be able to get to the joy!

Our children are grown now, and it’s their turn to practice these things in their relationships and teach their children a few lessons from The Book and the BEES!

 

1 Corinthians 13

from “The Message” Bible

3-7 If I give everything I own to the poor and even go to the stake to be burned as a martyr, but I don’t love, I’ve gotten nowhere. So, no matter what I say, what I believe, and what I do, I’m bankrupt without love.

Love never gives up.
Love cares more for others than for self.
Love doesn’t want what it doesn’t have.
Love doesn’t strut,
Doesn’t have a swelled head,
Doesn’t force itself on others,
Isn’t always “me first,”
Doesn’t fly off the handle,
Doesn’t keep score of the sins of others,
Doesn’t revel when others grovel,
Takes pleasure in the flowering of truth,
Puts up with anything,
Trusts God always,
Always looks for the best,
Never looks back,
But keeps going to the end.

8-10 Love never dies. Inspired speech will be over some day; praying in tongues will end; understanding will reach its limit. We know only a portion of the truth, and what we say about God is always incomplete. But when the Complete arrives, our incompletes will be canceled.