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Three Ways to eat with Propolis and BeeBread

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson 

Today is the first, real day where the weather felt like Fall.  I’m looking out my dining room window. Watching the limbs of my crabapple trees dip low to the ground, because they are loaded with heavy bright red, cherry size apples. Crabapple butter soon!   My favorite morning spread on buttered toast. yummy!  I’ll post that one, soon!

Ohio in September

 It’s been so busy today that I forgot to eat.  This really has gotten me to think about having healthy snack, ready to eat at a moments notice. And I’m not talking apples and carrot, which I do have, but something fun for my mouth.  Which made me think of  a conversation I had earlier in the day with a customer.  She has young, school age children who are feeling better, since they have been taking our Propolis oil.  But the girls are not crazy about the taste of Olive oil and Propolis. I don’t blame them. It’s not a taste that I crave either:) But like them, I do take it every day!  So I suggested she add the Propolis oil in a salad and if she bought some beebread she could add that t0 the girls morning oatmeal or in a yummy smoothie. Propolis tincture can be added to any fruit drinks. Added it to anything if you don’t want to take it straight down your throat.  She laughed and asked for some recipes.

First off…

If you don’t know what Propolis is, it’s a resin that the Honeybee gather from tops of trees bud and the bark. They mix it with their enzymes and then they plaster the whole inside of the hive.propolis in the hive

 It helps insulate the hive, it helps clean the hive and it protects the hive from bacteria and viruses.  This same Propolis that helps fight sickness in the hive, will also protect us from the the same viruses and bacteria floating and hanging about us.  Propolis icontains flavonoids that are anti viral, anti bacterial, anti microbial, anti fungal and an anti-inflammatory Propolis can be a great dietary supplement to enhance your overall health and boost immunity.

BeeBread is Pollen and Honey mixed together. BeeBread is filled with everything you need to energize your day, workout or recovery.  It is loaded with  vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein and iron that will benefit people of all ages and boost the immune system.

Flying about from flower to flower, bees collect pollen in the pollen baskets on their legs and carry it back to the hive. In the hive, pollen is used as a protein source necessary during brood-rearing. The pollen pellets and honey are combined and ferment until the the hard shell of the pollen is dissolve. At that time the bee will feast on it and feed it to their grwoing young.

So back to my phone conversation and my hungry stomach.  How can you get Propolis and BeeBread

into you daily route?  Here are a three recipes!

 Stay Healthy with the Power of BEES 

Basil Vinaigrette Dressing

Original recipe makes 1 -1/2 cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/2- 1 tsp of BEEpothecary Propolis Oil
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup BEEpothecary wildflower honey
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basiL
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

PREPARATION

  1. In a bowl, whisk together the olive oil, apple cider vinegar, honey, basil, and garlic. Pour over or toss with your favorite salad to serve

Pineapple Coconut Bitescoconut bites

INGREDIENTS

Makes: About 20 cookies

Active Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

INGREDIENTS

FILLING

  • 1 1/4 cups canned crushed pineapple, slightly drained
  • 1 tablespoon BEEpothecary honey
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

DOUGH

  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 6 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup unsalted cold butter
  • 3 tablespoons Propolis Coconut oil or Propolis Olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

PREPARATION

  1. To prepare filling: Spoon pineapple into a small saucepan with honey and cornstarch. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until thickened, about 3 minutes. Let cool.
  2. To prepare dough: Meanwhile, process almonds in a food processor until finely ground. Add confectioners’ sugar; process to combine. Add whole-wheat pastry flour and all-purpose flour; process to combine. Drop butter by the tablespoon through the feed tube, processing briefly after each addition. Add oil and pulse once or twice. Add coconut, cornstarch, salt and vanilla and process just until the mixture resembles crumbly, fine meal, but will hold together if pressed.
  3. Reserve a scant 1/2 cup of tart dough to use as crumbled topping.
  4. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line mini muffin pans with 20 paper cups.
  5. Drop a scant tablespoon of dough into each paper cup. Press the dough into the bottom and up the sides of the cup, making a well in the center, to form a miniature crust. Spoon 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons of the pineapple filling into each crust and top each with some of the reserved crumbs.
  6. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the crust is cooked through (watch carefully toward the end and move the pan to the bottom rack if the top begins to brown before the bottom crust is done), 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool in the pans.

 

 

No-Bake BeeBread Granola Bars beebread no bakes

INGREDIENTS

PREP TIME: 10 mins
COOK TIME: 5 mins
TOTAL TIME: 15 mins
Serves: 10 bars
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 cup packed dates, pitted  (dried plums or figs)
  • 3 Tbsp Flax seed
  • 1/4 cup BEEpothecary BeeBread 
  • 1/4 cup creamy salted natural peanut butter or almond butter
  • 1 cup roasted unsalted almonds, loosely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats (gluten free for GF eaters)
  • optional additions: chocolate chips, dried fruit, nuts, banana chips, vanilla, etc.
PREPARATIONbeebread no bake 2
  1. Process dates in a food processor until small bits remain (about 1 minute). It should form a “dough” like consistency. (mine rolled into a ball)
  2. Optional step: Toast your oats and flaxseed in a 350 degree oven for 15-ish minutes or until slightly golden brown. Otherwise, leave them raw – I toasted them
  3. Place oats, flax seed, almonds and dates in a bowl – set aside.
  4. Warm honey and peanut butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Stir and pour over oat mixture and then mix, breaking up the dates to disperse throughout.
  5. Once thoroughly mixed, transfer to an 8×8 dish or other small pan lined with plastic wrap or parchment paper so they lift out easily. (A loaf pan might work, but will yield thicker bars.)
  6. Press down until uniformly flattened. Cover with parchment or plastic wrap, and let set in fridge or freezer for 15-20 minutes to harden.
  7. Remove bars from pan and chop into 10 even bars. Store in an airtight container for up to a few days. I kept mine in the freezer to keep them extra fresh, but it isn’t necessary.
NOTES
*If your dates don’t feel sticky and moist, soak them in water for 10 minutes then drain before processing. This will ultimately help hold the bars together better.

Looking forward to seeing you soon, Laurie –

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and Twitter @BEEpothecary

Matthew 4:4

Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Honey and Propolis on bee stings

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The Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey

by Laurie Dotson

What a weekend! Pete installing nucs IMG_1448 Pete and I picked up four Honeybee Nucs, from our friends John George and Terry Eddy, in Plain City, OH. You ask, what are Nucs? I’ll tell you what they are. Nucs are small honey bee colonies created from larger colonies. The term refers both to the smaller size box and the colony of honeybees within it. The name is derived from the fact that a nuc hive is centered around a queen – the nucleus of the honey bee colony. Pete installed our two in our bee yard, while I assisted. It went great so, we decide this is the way to go instead of buying 3 lbs packages of bees. Before we finished in the Bee yard, we feed the new family members sugar and water. Now we let them do what they do best. BEE stuff!

IMG_1450

Nucs with five frames full of bees and a queen

Then we took the other two Nucs to Steve and Jeannie Saum’s bee yard, to install them into empty hives. Pete gets started on the first hive and I start on the second one. Pete’s hive was calm, gentle and easy to install. I opened my box of bees. You would have thought a volcano erupted, with an over flowing of bee lava. All of a sudden, I have bee stinging me through my gloves and clothes. The worst thing that can happen, happens.

My worst nightmares come to life. Two or three bees find their way up into my veil. I can feel one crawling on my neck and   then   comes the  “bleeping” sting.  Holy, moly! it hurts and the burning begins. It’s at that point, I need to get my veil off, while remaining calm. I had no idea how many bees were on me.  I’m telling you it felt thousands of buzzing, angry honeybees ramming into me, diving at me and into my hair, swarming around my head and body!  I started to leave the bee yard to free myself of my veil…I try to  stay calm …walking …STAYING calm… walking faster…then I panic and break into a “run for my life” kind of a run.  I’m running down the Saum’s neighbor’s driveway, heading towards their house.  I’m screaming and whacking at every buzzing noise I hear. Whacks to my face, head, body, arms and legs. That’s when I start ripping my clothes off to rid myself of the bees clinging to my jacket and clothes. I had bees stuck in my hair, crawling up my shirt, and down my under clothes. I ran for the carport to redress and to figure out what the heck,  just happened.  I still had a ton of bee following me.  uugh!

Pete is still watching me and looking at the eruption that just happened. Those bees wouldn’t even let Him install them.  So we left those HOT honeybees for the night and decided to come back the next morning.

ALL in all, I was only stung five times.  One on my neck, two on my wrist, one on my armpit and one on top of my head.   At home, I get out the BEEpothecary Propolis Oil to help with pain and inflammation.  I felt so much better, but few hours later my wrist was swollen, very hot and in painful. At this point, I put on the BEEpothecary Wound Salve, because I know it has soothing and healing herbal oil, in addition to,  propolis. Within a few minutes I feel better and now I can sleep.

The next day, we returned to the angry bees and opened up the box. First thing, Peter gets stung.  We decide to leave them again, only this time with the lid off the box, to let them cool down… A few hours later, with a smoker that was heavily smoking. We were able to install the bees, feed them sugar and leave without a bite.

Whew!  That is done!  I would do it again, because our bees are vanishing and without bees we won’t have food!

We Thank God for the honeybees and all the opportunities we have been given because of them.

Thank you, to each of person who have bought our products, listened to us talk about Bees and BEEpothecary!  We appreciate you and your feed back!  We have been given this moment, to help and promote health through the honeybees.

Your Health…Powered by BEES!

Blessings from Laurie and Pete –

Check out out Marketplace:  mkt.com/hive-and-honey-beepothecary

Psalms 40: 4-5

Blessed is the one who trusts in the Lord, who does not look to the proud, to those who turn aside to false gods.  Many, Lord my God, are the wonders you have done, the things you planned for us. None can compare with you; were I to speak and tell of your deeds, they would be too many to declare.

Winter Chores on Our Mini Farm

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Though retired, we’re still havin’ trouble

Keeping up with the chores, We’ll have to redouble

Our efforts to keep chickens fed and watered,

Egg gathered, washed and put in cartons.

Then there’s the bees, about all we can do

Is pray them through until next spring!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Rain Barrel wrapped in insulation and plastic

Rain Barrel wrapped in insulation and plastic

The worst of winter hit Ohio early this year with three weeks of snow and some bitter cold nights in early December.  We outfitted our chicken coop with a heat lamp and thermostat, a rain barrel watering system wrapped with heat tape and run through the wall with a washing machine hose to an automatic pet watering dish with float.  This sits on

auto-pet watering bowl fed by heat tape wrapped washing machine hose, sitting on metal oil pan with light bulb under it

auto-pet watering bowl fed by heat tape wrapped washing machine hose, sitting on metal oil pan with light bulb under it

an upside down metal oil pan fitted with an incandescent light bulb to keep the water unfrozen when it gets really cold.

We’ve also added a timer and light to come on from 4 am to 8 am to supplement their light on short winter days.  This helps them keep laying at full capacity, so  we still get 18-20 eggs a day from our 20 red hens.

heat lamp connected to thermostat, light connected to timer

heat lamp connected to thermostat, light connected to timer

I also decided, a few weeks ago, to block off the bottom row of nest boxes that were on the floor level.  We had

Bottom next boxes blocked off, now laying in second row up

Bottom next boxes blocked off, now laying in second row up

re-purposed a shelving unit into 15 nest boxes, but the 20 chickens only use two or three to lay all their eggs – and it’s always the bottom ones.  That means we have to bend way down to collect eggs out of the lowest boxes.  I decided I’m too old for that!  So I screwed some thin plywood boards over the bottom nests so they can’t use them.  Problem solved!  Now they are using the next row up!  As I’ve said before, we are lazy farmers and have tried to set things up so some chores don’t have to be done every day!

Today, since we had a bit of a heat-wave, we went out to quickly finish some of the fall chores we missed, and tweak a few problem areas.   Our chicken watering system had leaked a little and made some of the straw wet, so we headed out to the coup with some wrenches and feed.  The girls are always excited to see us and expect a treat.  They squawk loudly and chase us around, pecking at our shoes.  We hauled out wet hay, tightened the leaky connection, refilled their food and re- duct taped the black plastic covering our insulated rain barrel, since the wind had blown it off.

They always expect a treat and love popcorn!

They always expect a treat and love popcorn!

Next, we headed out to our apiary of 4 hives.  One thing we didn’t get done in late fall was removing the hive top feeders from our beehives before the winter snow hit. We loosened the top and box feeder on the top of each hive, quickly took them off and sneaked a quick peek before putting the inner cover and lid back on.  We were excited to find live bee clusters in all 4 hives!  They’ve made it so far!  We left 2 boxes of honey on each hive to feed them over the winter.  The bees cluster together and vibrate  their wings to create enough heat to keep the queen in the middle warm at 85 – 90 degrees!  They work hard doing this all winter, moving in and out in the cluster to get warm and need lots of honey for energy.  I learned something new at a fall beekeepers’ meeting – that the bees don’t heat the inside of the hive.  They only heat the cluster.  For this reason, many beekeepers suggest not insulating the hive.  Insulation can create air flow problems that causes moisture to collect and drip on the bees, and they’ll die.  The bees can take the cold, but not being wet.

cluster of bees under the inner cover

cluster of bees under the inner cover

~~

Another thing I learned recently was, that when it snows we must make sure the lower entrance does not get clogged with snow and ice.  This can happen even if the snow isn’t that deep and create airflow and moisture problems.  So I’ve been stopping at the hives on my trips down the driveway, when we’ve had a snow, to clear off the entrance ledges.  So far, so good.

~  ~  ~  ~

Bees carry out the dead to the entrance ledge.

Bees carry out the dead to the entrance ledge.

Psalm 65

You answer us with awesome and righteous deeds,  God our Savior, the hope of all the ends of the earth and of the farthest seas,
who formed the mountains by your power, having armed yourself with strength,
who stilled the roaring of the seas, the roaring of their waves, and the turmoil of the nations.
The whole earth is filled with awe at your wonders; where morning dawns, where evening fades, you call forth songs of joy.

You care for the land and water it; you enrich it abundantly. The streams of God are filled with water to provide the people with grain,  for so you have ordained it.
10 You drench its furrows and level its ridges; you soften it with showers and bless its crops.
11 You crown the year with your bounty, and your carts overflow with abundance.
12 The grasslands of the wilderness overflow; the hills are clothed with gladness.
13 The meadows are covered with flocks and the valleys are mantled with grain; they shout for joy and sing.

Blessings for our Thanksgiving!

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

Thanksgiving has become one of my favorite holidays. An acquaintance wrote my sentiments to a tee and I would like to post them. So without further ado… She says, For weeks I look forward to preparing a beautiful meal and relaxing with my family. Sadly, Thanksgiving night invariably finds me deflated. I regret having gotten irritable in the final crazy minutes of gravy making and turkey carving or feel dispirited by the lack of meaningful conversation at the table. I miss the family members who are absent. I wish people would have gotten along better and connected more deeply. The list of discontents varies from year to year but the theme is the same: it didn’t turn out exactly as I had hoped.

This year I am on to myself. All month I’ve been thinking about letting go of my imaginary ideals and showing up with an open heart for whatever happens. I anticipate that it may be a little hard to pull off on the big day. I know I’m not alone. For many people the holidays are a time of heightened need for things to be a particular way. Certainly there’s nothing wrong with wanting a lovely holiday. But high expectations can hold us in their grip. What we want to see blinds us to what is actually in front of us and diminishes it. If we then distance ourselves from the imperfect, that gap makes it even harder to connect to things as they are. It is only in approaching a thing — be it this particular holiday meal or an individual human being — with attention that we can fully appreciate it, for all its faults and strengths, for all its funky uniqueness. Paying attention with kindness opens us to the wholeness around us. From there it is a short leap to gratitude. That which we see deeply enough can virtually always be counted as a blessing.

As we each look around our Thanksgiving tables next week, may we focus on the kindness and generosity that is shared between us and give thanks for the day we have been given, whether or not it is the one we had imagined.

Blessings on your holiday table.  Don’t forget to invite a friend or two who need a family to share this day with! 

Thanksgiving-Dinner-Turkey

Honey Roast Turkey

Turkey ingredients

  • 1  12 – 14  pound  fresh or frozen natural turkey
  • 2 cups  water
  • 1/2 cup  Hive & Honey BEEpothecary honey
  • 1/4 cup  finely snipped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons  finely snipped fresh sage
  • 2 tablespoons  snipped fresh thyme
  • 4 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon  olive oil
  • 1/2 kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup  Hive & Honey BEEpothecary honey
  • 2 tablespoons  butter
  •  Apple Cider Sauce (see recipe below) (optional)

directions

1.Thaw turkey if frozen. In a medium saucepan combine water, 1/2 cup honey, and about half of the parsley, sage, thyme, and garlic. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Stir in olive oil. Cover; let stand 30 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve; discard solids.

2.Rinse turkey; pat dry with paper towels. Skewer the neck skin to the back. Tie legs to tail. Twist wing tips under the back.

3.Place the turkey, breast side up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Using a flavor-injector syringe, inject the honey mixture into the meat of the turkey. (This may take up to 20 injections, so try to evenly distribute the seasoned mixture in the turkey. If the syringe gets clogged with a bit of seasoning, you will need to flush it out with water and a toothpick.) Sprinkle turkey lightly with salt and pepper.

4.Insert a meat thermometer into the center of one of the inside thigh muscles without the thermometer touching the bone. Cover turkey loosely with foil. Roast in a 325 degree F oven for 2-1/2 hours.

5.For glaze, in a small saucepan, heat and stir 1/4 cup honey and butter until butter is melted. Stir in remaining parsley, sage, thyme, garlic, salt, and pepper.

6.Remove turkey from oven. Cut the string between the drumsticks so the thighs will cook evenly. Remove the foil to let the bird brown. Brush about one-third of the glaze over turkey. Return turkey to oven and roast for 30 to 60 minutes more, brushing two more times with remaining glaze, or until meat thermometer registers 180 degrees F and juices run clear.

7.Remove turkey from oven and cover loosely with foil. Let stand for 15 minutes before carving. Carve turkey into thin slices and, if desired, serve with Apple Cider Sauce. Makes 18 servings.

Apple Cider Sauce

 ingredients

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons  butter
  • 3 tablespoons  flour
  • 1 1/2 cups  chicken broth
  • 1 cup  apple cider
  • 1/4 cup  Hive & Honey BEEpothecary honey
  • 2 tablespoons  cider vinegar
  •  Salt
  •  Pepper

directions

1.In a medium saucepan, cook onion in butter until tender. Stir in flour, broth, apple cider, honey and cider vinegar. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Cook and stir 1 minute more. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

From the Laurie and Pete Dotson and Jeannie and Steve Saum,

We wish you Great Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving Eating !

(P.S. Take your Propolis and Honey and stay healthy this holiday season!)

Psalm 95:2-3  Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song.  For the LORD is the great God, the great King above all gods.

Labor Day – Peanut Butter Honey Fluff

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Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

Today is Labor Day and I get a day off of work…or do I?  I guess, I will not have school work but I do have farm chores, house work and final preparation for the Lithopolis HoneyFest. Sept 6-7th.   We are also extracting honey today.

Active heathy, hive box

Active heathy, hive box

It’s always fun to see how much we will get.  The bummer is, we had one of our hives swarm.  A swarm is when a cluster of bees leave the hive to find another place to house their queen and start a new hive.  Why does this happen, you ask?  Either because of sickness, pest problems, a weak queen, or over population.  But before, I could get out to the hive and save the deserted honey. It was robbed of all its honey by other bees.  I’m hoping the robbers were from our other hives within our apiary.  Our goal this year, is to get our bees through the winter. We have not been luck with winterizing our bees in the past.

How a Hive is set up in the spring

How a Hive is set up in the spring and summer. You would add more hive boxes to the top as the bees multiple and honey production getting greater.

~Later this morning~ So, we just got back in from pulling frames for extraction.  Sad, Sad, News!  There was not enough honey to take. The Queen is laying broad and the hive is active. We felt that the bees needed all the honey they had and what they will be producing to help them through the winter.  We did hear that our Michigan Partners did very well. 30 gallons!  We look forward to eating that when we can.   Not the best of news!  Not a good year for bees either.   Oh Well!

Here’s some good news!  I have an ole friend, who sent me this recipe.  It is perfect for snacking during extracting. (haha, that rhymed – If you know me well enough. I’d never make a good rapper, because I can’t rhyme.  I end up making up word with the same endings sound) anywhooo!  many boo! hehe_ Deb, my twin sister, does the same thing!  On to the Recipe…

Anna Parks thought of me when she saw this recipe. I’ll share it with you

Thank you, Anna

 http://www.iheartnaptime.net/peanut-butter-honey-dip/

Peanut Butter Honey Fluff

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all natural peanut butter
  • 1 (8 oz) container lite cool whip
  • 2 ½ – 3 tbsp honey

INSTRUCTIONS

In a bowl, whip peanut butter and cool whip together until fluffy. Beat in 2 tablespoons of honey (or more for a stronger honey flavor). Beat for another 2 minutes until fluffy. Spoon into a serving bowl and drizzle honey over the top. Serve with fruit or graham crackers.

Happy Eating !

Luke 12:32

“Do not be afraid, little flock, for your Father is well pleased to give you the kingdom.

Beekeepers’ Field Trip

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Going’ on a field trip

To the beekeeper’s yard.

Gettin’ all our new stuff

For spring is almost sprung!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea

Today, Steve and I made a trip to our beekeeping supplier’s place.  He has a country home and farm, where he keeps about 100 hives and runs a supply business out of 2 big barns.  It’s always exciting to get new things for a hobby or interest, and beekeeping is no exception.  It’s kind of like planning a garden and ordering seeds in the late winter, getting ready for spring!  Though it was cold and rainy today, in the 40’s, it was fun to go pick out the things we need for our new season of bees.  We will be replacing the 3 hives we lost last season and adding one more.  Our kids gave Steve 3 new hive boxes for Christmas, so we got frames, a cover,m an inner cover and bottom board for those.  We also want to collect much more propolis this year, as we have plans to make health and skin care supplements to sell.  So we bought 4 propolis traps.  We also learned about the health benefits of pollen, so we got some pollen collectors as well. And, (I guess there is no going back now!) I asked for a hive tool of my own!!  If I am really going to be a beekeeper, I guess I need to have my own tool!    We ordered our 4 packages of bees and 2 for Pete and Laurie.  Phew!  Beekeeping is not cheap!

On the next nice day, Steve will make moveable shelf like platforms for our hives.  We have seen that some beekeepers put their boxes up on platforms to make them easier to work on without bending down so far. Steve doesn’t want to put permanent platforms in,  so he will use stacked cement blocks and 2 x 12 boards that can be moved around as he sees fit.

After seeing “decorator” hives at the Beekeeper’s Conference, I am thinking that I might have to get involved and make all these additions “cute” with paint and designs!  We’ll see . . .

In the meantime – rain, rain, go away!  We want to check on our bees!

Psalm 107

31 Let them give thanks to the LORD for his unfailing love and his wonderful deeds for men.

32 Let them exalt him in the assembly of the people and praise him in the council of the elders.

33 He turned rivers into a desert, flowing springs into thirsty ground,

34 and fruitful land into a salt waste, because of the wickedness of those who lived there.

35 He turned the desert into pools of water and the parched ground into flowing springs;

36 there he brought the hungry to live, and they founded a city where they could settle.

37 They sowed fields and planted vineyards that yielded a fruitful harvest;

38 he blessed them, and their numbers greatly increased, and he did not let their herds diminish

Making a New Kind of Honey

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Psalms from the Hive

by Jeannie Saum

Honey golden, sweet, and yummy

But a sticky drippy mess

Running down the bottle sides

On hands, counters and dress.

What is the solution

To this delish but sticky goo?

Velvet honey is the answer.

I’m making some for you!

Clover, Bee, and Revery

Reverie (revery) –(n.) state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea.

Today Steve made our first batch of a different form of honey, from our crystallized fall honey.  This honey of  different form  goes by many different names – whipped honey, honey butter, creamed honey or honey fondant.  But non of these names seem right to me.  They all seem to infer that something else is added to the honey.  Whipped honey is NOT really whipped with air.  Honey butter does NOT have butter in it.  Creamed honey does NOT have cream in it!  Honey Fondant seemed better, but not a word most are familiar with.  So while Steve worked in the kitchen on this batch of honey “whatever”, I set out to find a new name for our concoction!

To make this wonderful form of honey, here’s what you do

  1. Make sure your honey is all liquid.  If it is crystallized, soak the jar in a very warm water bath until crystals are dissolved.  I have found that a crock pot, filled with water and turned up to high with the lid off, works great.  Depending on how crystallized your honey is, it may take a day or more to convert it back to liquid.
  2. Buy or make some whipped honey to use as  “starter seeds.”  It is said you can make some by grinding crystallized honey with a mortar and pestle until the crystals are so fine you can’t feel them with your tongue, but we didn’t have any luck trying this!  We ended up buying some whipped honey to get started.  Just make sure that what you buy is 100% pure honey!
  3. In a large container mix 10% of whipped honey with 90% of your liquid honey.  You can hand stir or use your mixer on a very low setting.  Be careful not to whip air bubbles into the honey.  Stir just enough to mix well.stir by hand
    stir by hand
  4. Pour honey into wide mouth jars as opposed to the typical honey bottles.  Honey in this new form will need to be dipped out with a knife or spoon and spread like jelly.  You will not be able to squeeze it out of a bottle.  We used small canning jars and small plastic containers made for freezer jelly.  Half pint and pint jars work well.
  5. Put lids on the jars and store in a cool, dark place (55 degrees, ideally) for a week.  We put ours in our basement.
  6. After a week, voila, all the jars of honey will have turned to a smooth, spreadable texture!  No drips, no mess – but the same wonderful, pure,  honey taste!
  7. After 5-7 days, check on your honey.  If it is a lighter color all the way down to the bottom of the containers, it is ready!  If not, leave a few days longer.
  8. This honey can be sold for  little more than liquid honey, since it involves extra work!

Meanwhile, I used an online Thesarus to try to find a new name for this form of honey – one that wouldn’t make people think it had something else added to it.  I found two words I thought would work – silk and velvet – since no one would assume these things were added to the honey!  We decided to use the word, velvet and are calling our new form of honey – Velvet Honey!

Can hardly wait to try ours!  Why does a week seem so long!

2 Timothy 2

5 Follow the Lord’s rules for doing his work, just as an athlete either follows the rules or is disqualified and wins no prize.

6 Hardworking farmers are the first to enjoy the fruit of their labor.

7 Think about what I am saying. The Lord will give you understanding in all these things.

8 Never forget that Jesus Christ was a man born into King David’s family and that he was raised from the dead. This is the Good News I preach.

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