Land of Milk and Honey

Cooking with Honey by Laurie Dotson

With the start of this New Year being so cold and unpredictable. I thought a good recipe that is easy, warm and delicious would fit the bag!  A keeper it is!

I LOVE BEER!  I said it!  If I had a choice of wine or beer. Beer would be my pick!  Even though it’s the oldest fermented drink in the world, beer isn’t beloved by everyone and there is a fair sized group of people who just don’t like the taste of beer. Yet when everyone else around you continues to extol the virtues of every bottle of beer they’ve consumed, you might begin to wonder just what it is you’re missing out on. You may not believe it right now but to many people, good beer drinking experiences are akin to tasting fine wine or single malt scotch; indeed, one of the tests of a fine beer is that it does taste good. For you, liking the taste of beer may have to be an acquired approach but it can grow on you gradually through a better understanding of which beers might taste better (to you) and how to serve each beer so that it is at its optimal flavor. Perhaps it’s time to reacquaint yourself with beer and to find a taste in beer that does please you.

I do want to add, that if you have a problem holding your beer, or you know that alcohol is a problem in your life. This is not your excuse to start back up or continue on with your problem.
 

Back the the Recipe!  Beer does wonders for this bread, and the bread does not taste like beer. Most of the alcohol bakes off and what you’re left with is wonderfully textured bread, with great depth of flavor. The bread is about as sweet as storebought honey-whole wheat sandwich bread. Although there’s no whole wheat flour in the bread, it has a wheaty, nutty quality which I love,  courtesy of the beer.  I used one teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg, as well as a dash of molasses, all of which add warming undertones and little bursts of comforting flavors. They’re very subtle, but present. It’s the nutmeg that I notice most, and it plays wonderfully off the honey and maple.

I have to admit this post is stolen from another blogger!  averie cooks I can’t lie or at less very well! Two Thumbs up!!

It’s total comfort food and I loved it.

Effortless, goofproof, and tastes amazing.

honeybeerbread-9

 Honey Maple Beer Bread

This is some of the best bread I’ve ever made, and it’s definitely the easiest. No yeast, no-knead, no fuss. Simply combine all the ingredients in one bowl, pour beer over, stir, and bake. Foolproof, goofproof bread that’s ridiculously soft and moist. It doesn’t taste like beer and it’s safe to feed to kids.   Use it as French toast bread or for overnight French toast bakes. Serve it with soup, chili, dip it in hummus, or take the spices and flavor profile more savory by adding garlic or onion powder, curry, oregano, dill, or your favorites. Work-free, versatile, fabulous bread.

YIELD: 1 tall 9×5 loaf, about 12 thick slices

PREP TIME: 5 minutesCOOK TIME: 40 minutes

TOTAL TIME: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons light, mild, or medium molasses (not blackstrap)
1/4 cup local honey
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt, optional and to taste
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
12 ounces beer (I used a Honey Pumpkin Ale;  use your favorite beer)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F. Spray a 9×5-inch loaf pan with floured cooking spray, or grease and flour the pan; set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, add the first 9 ingredients (through baking powder). Tip: Measure the oil in a 1/4-cup measure, filling it halfway (there’s 4 tablespoons in 1/4-cup, so halfway is 2 tablespoons). By adding the oil first, it coats the measuring cup so the subsequent sticky ingredients (molasses, honey, maple) will slide right out.
  3. Slowly pour beer over the top. It will bubble and foam. Stir until combined. Batter is thick, gloppy, and dense.
  4. Turn batter out into prepared pan, smoothing the top lightly with a spatula. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until top is domed and set, and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean or with a few moist crumbs, but no batter. Allow bread to cool in pan for about 15 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Slice using a serrated knife. Bread is best fresh, but will keep airtight for up to 4 days. As the days pass, toasting it is recommended. Serving Ideas: with butter, hummus, olive oil and balsamic; eat is as toast, use as sandwich bread, dip in soup, use for French toast, dice day-old bread and bake for croutons or dice and make a French toast bake or bread pudding.
Deuteronomy 14:26

Use the silver to buy whatever you like: cattle, sheep, wine or other fermented drink, or anything you wish. Then you and your household shall eat there in the presence of the Lord your God and rejoice.
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